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What is Integrative Medicine?

Tanmeet Sethi, MD
Integrative medicine is an approach to care that puts the patient at the center and addresses the full range of physical, emotional, mental, social, spiritual and environmental influences that affect a person's health. Employing a personalized strategy that considers the patient's unique conditions, needs and circumstances, integrative medicine uses the most appropriate interventions from an array of scientific disciplines to heal illness and disease and help people regain and maintain optimal health.
  ---Bravewell Collaborative

Integrative medicine is really all of the above and so much more. Integrative medicine is a medical specialty that focuses on the whole person. It acknowledges that we all have individualized biochemical and genetic needs. It recognizes that we all can improve our health by looking at ALL the factors that impact us.

One of the fundamental differences between an integrative physician and a conventionally trained physician is that I first look at what barriers to health I might need to remove (inflammatory diet, poor stress management techniques, toxic pollutants, negative thoughts, supplements or pharmaceuticals that may be disrupting health, etc.) before I think of what to “put in".

Donation provides wigs for Swedish patients with cancer

Shannon Marsh

Shannon Marsh
American Cancer Society Patient Navigator

Earlier this year,  Kerensa Corlett discovered a lump in her breast that turned out to be breast cancer.  She had no family history of breast cancer and was not due for her first mammogram until January 2015, when she turned 40.  Kerensa feels very lucky because she caught it early. She is currently undergoing chemotherapy at Swedish, but you would never know it because she is always positive and has a smile on her face. When asked, she tells her story in the hopes that she can help save a life, promoting early detection.

Using a Gene Test to Assess Recurrence Risk for Women with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

Patricia L. Dawson
Participants at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Conference were recently updated on the status of OncotypeDx for DCIS. 

Providers at the Swedish Cancer Institute have been using  this technology since it became available about 4 years ago. The test is done on the tissue after surgery to see if it might be safe to not add radiation therapy to lumpectomy / partial mastectomy for carefully selected DCIS patients.

There is now data on ...

Do I need a pap smear?

Crystal Houlton
When women come in for their yearly well-woman exam, many are surprised to find out that they may not need a pap smear. This is because the mechanisms through which women develop changes in their cervix that may lead to cervical cancer are now much better understood. This had led to a drastic change in pap smear screening recommendations with the most recent updates to recommendations in 2012. Although, we still recommend regular well-woman exams, it is likely that most women will only need a pap smear every ...

Is Your Shoulder Pain a Rotator Cuff Injury?

Sara Jurek, MD

Sara Jurek, MD
Orthopedic Surgeon

What exactly is the rotator cuff?

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that envelope and attach to the “ball” of the shoulder (the humeral head). The cuff is responsible for keeping the ball squarely centered within the shallow socket of the shoulder. 
Reproduced from orthoinfo.aaos.org

What are the symptoms of a rotator cuff injury and who is affected?

A rotator cuff injury can cause a ..

What type of MS do I have?

James D. Bowen, MD

Traditionally, MS has been divided into four clinical courses: relapsing/remitting, primary progressive, secondary progressive and progressive relapsing. These four were intended as descriptions of the different courses that MS could take in patients, and were not based on any particular understanding of the biology of the disease, the cause of the disease, or even the prognosis of patients with the different types of MS. Over the years, our understanding of MS has improved, and these descriptions of the disease course no longer meet our needs to describe the disease.

Over the past couple of years, there has been a revision of our classification of MS, resulting in a publication in July 2014. The recommendations of this revision have been  ..

How to deal with acute or chronic diarrhea

Melanie Panchal
Diarrhea is described as loose watery stools sometimes with increase in frequency requiring frequent trips to the toilet.  In most cases diarrhea symptoms usually last for a few days, but if the symptoms occur for more than the 30 days it can be a sign of a serious disorder. 

Diarrhea occurs when the food and fluids you ingest pass too quickly through your colon.  Diarrhea can be classified into acute or chronic and its symptoms can be classified as uncomplicated and complicated.  Uncomplicated symptoms of diarrhea are abdominal cramping/bloating, thin loose watery stools, and the sense of urgency to have a bowel movements.  Symptoms of complicated diarrhea include blood or undigested food in the stool, weight loss and fever.  If you have symptoms of complicated diarrhea you need to notify your primary care provider for further evaluation.
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