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Pediatric Experts Voice Concern Over Feeding Children Rice

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP
Pediatric Gastroenterologist

A recent consensus statement written by international pediatric nutrition experts has recommended that infants and young children avoid rice-based drinks.  This is due to the fact that some types of rice contain large concentrations of inorganic arsenic, a first-level carcinogen.  There is no safe level of intake, because any exposure is risky.  The longer the exposure to inorganic arsenic, the more toxic its effects.

The newly published report reminds us that rice and derived products such as starch, flour and syrup are used to fortify different foods, including drinks, purees, and snacks.  These are foods often fed to infants and young children.  Since most of the inorganic arsenic in rice is concentrated in the outer bran layers, the report also highlights that potentially, the most harmful type of exposure is that which comes from products manufactured from brown rice.  

To reduce the harmful effects from arsenic exposure in rice-based foods, experts recommend the following:

FDA Questions Safety of Constipation Medication

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP
Pediatric Gastroenterologist

On Monday the New York Times published an article about the FDA’s plan to research the safety of a very commonly prescribed medication, polyethylene glycol 3350 or PEG 3350 (most commonly known under the brand name, MiraLAX®).  As a pediatric gastroenterologist who often recommends this medication, I wanted to share my personal thoughts after reading the article.

First of all, although the news was certainly a surprise to me, it was a pleasant one. I was ...

Winter 2015 Classes: Registration Now Open

Jolyn Hull

Jolyn Hull
Health Education Specialist, Swedish Cancer Institute

The Swedish Cancer Institute Cancer Education Center offers educational classes that are open to patients, caregivers, family, and friends. Our wide variety of classes include topics of things like chair yoga, hair alternatives, music therapy and more.

The classes we offer are meant to be interactive, educational, and offer you tools to assist and prepare throughout you or your loved one’s journey. These programs may also help you, your family, friends and caregivers in making treatment decisions, managing your symptoms, and accessing complementary programs to help your mind, body and spirit to heal.

What's next after breast cancer?

Damarise Navarro, MPH

Damarise Navarro, MPH
Health Education Specialist, Swedish Cancer Institute

The Swedish Cancer Institute offers several groups for patients and their caregivers, one of which being ABC-After Breast Cancer: What’s Next?  The breast cancer survivorship class has positively impacted the lives of many individuals and has shown to be extremely beneficial and of great interest to breast cancer patients.


ABC is a free eight-week supportive educational series for women to learn practical life skills to help rebuild after active breast cancer treatment is completed. During the eight-week program participants have the opportunity to make peace with the impacts of cancer treatment, reduce the stress cancer places on relationships, overcome the fear of recurrence, and renew hope and increase resilience.  Individuals who are preparing to complete or have completed breast cancer treatment are invited to sign up for the class. The program provides a sense of community amongst breast cancer survivors.

What is Integrative Medicine?

Tanmeet Sethi, MD
Integrative medicine is an approach to care that puts the patient at the center and addresses the full range of physical, emotional, mental, social, spiritual and environmental influences that affect a person's health. Employing a personalized strategy that considers the patient's unique conditions, needs and circumstances, integrative medicine uses the most appropriate interventions from an array of scientific disciplines to heal illness and disease and help people regain and maintain optimal health.
  ---Bravewell Collaborative

Integrative medicine is really all of the above and so much more. Integrative medicine is a medical specialty that focuses on the whole person. It acknowledges that we all have individualized biochemical and genetic needs. It recognizes that we all can improve our health by looking at ALL the factors that impact us.

One of the fundamental differences between an integrative physician and a conventionally trained physician is that I first look at what barriers to health I might need to remove (inflammatory diet, poor stress management techniques, toxic pollutants, negative thoughts, supplements or pharmaceuticals that may be disrupting health, etc.) before I think of what to “put in".

Donation provides wigs for Swedish patients with cancer

Shannon Marsh

Shannon Marsh
American Cancer Society Patient Navigator

Earlier this year,  Kerensa Corlett discovered a lump in her breast that turned out to be breast cancer.  She had no family history of breast cancer and was not due for her first mammogram until January 2015, when she turned 40.  Kerensa feels very lucky because she caught it early. She is currently undergoing chemotherapy at Swedish, but you would never know it because she is always positive and has a smile on her face. When asked, she tells her story in the hopes that she can help save a life, promoting early detection.

Using a Gene Test to Assess Recurrence Risk for Women with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

Patricia L. Dawson
Participants at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Conference were recently updated on the status of OncotypeDx for DCIS. 

Providers at the Swedish Cancer Institute have been using  this technology since it became available about 4 years ago. The test is done on the tissue after surgery to see if it might be safe to not add radiation therapy to lumpectomy / partial mastectomy for carefully selected DCIS patients.

There is now data on ...
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