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'Movement Disorders' posts

January 25 essential tremor seminar

If you or someone you care about shakes a lot—it could be essential tremor (ET) or another movement disorder. Essential tremor is a disorder affecting approximately 10 million Americans. This progressive neurological condition can cause the hands, head, voice, legs or trunk of the body to shake and can cause significant disability. It is often confused with Parkinson’s disease or dystonia. Because of stereotypes and lack of awareness, many people with ET never seek medical care, though most would benefit from treatment.
 
In an upcoming event, Dr. Ryder Gwinn will explain the causes, diagnosis,  research and treatment options for essential tremor.
 
Date: Saturday, January 25
Time: Check-in 9:30am/Program 10am-Noon
Location: Bellevue Hilton, 300 112 Ave SE, Bellevue, WA
 
There is no charge for the event but please note, parking in the Bellevue Hilton lot is $5.

Registration is required - call 888-387-3667 or visit www.essentialtremor.org/seminars

 

 
 

How much tremor is too much?

Tremor is a normal physiologic reaction to anxiety or stress, but it is not normal to have a tremor when performing typical daily activities.

People who develop a tremor while eating, drinking, writing or doing other common activities may have a movement disorder called Essential Tremor. This is actually the most common movement disorder, and can affect up to 4% of people over age 40. People who have this disorder can take medications to help minimize the tremor, but they don't often reduce the tremor by more than about half. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an excellent treatment option for people with severe tremor, and can nearly eliminate the tremor in many patients. Many patients aren't sure when their tremor is severe enough to warrant surgery, and much of our conversation in the office is to help answer this question.

There is no one answer that is right for everyone, but for me it has to do with how well someone is actually doing in their daily life:

The Goal of DBS (Deep Brain Stimulation) Surgery

I met with several patients this week to discuss their personal journey to making the decision to pursue DBS surgery. Not surprisingly, they were well educated about their disease and treatment options.

Each patient reminded me that there is a lot of information and misinformation about surgery for movement disorders.

The most important advice I can give any patient or family is...

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