Tags
Blog

'hearing aids' posts

No One is Too Young for a Hearing Test!

How young is too young for a hearing test?

Your child is never too young for a hearing test! Different ages require special considerations, but children of all ages can have their hearing tested. Most children born in Washington State receive a hearing test before being discharged from the hospital.

Hearing tests are painless and encouraged for all newborns. According to statistics, approximately 3 in 1000 births will result in permanent hearing loss. Additionally, chronic ear infections, speech and language concerns and some illnesses and infections may lead your child to need a test.

You may remember having your hearing screened as a child at school. Hearing tests have come a long way from the traditional method of wearing headphones and raising a hand in response to a tone! Hearing is assessed using different tools and techniques based on the age of a child...

October is National Protect Your Hearing Month!

Noise exposure causes permanent hearing loss, and it is 100% preventable!

Hearing loss from noise exposure can occur at any age. Over 36 million Americans experience hearing loss… an amount over four times larger than the entire population of New York City! Over 18 million of those Americans with hearing loss are under the age of 65.

Today’s modern world is full of everyday objects that emit hazardous levels of noise. Exposure to noise louder than 85 dB is considered loud enough to potentially damage hearing. Consider your exposure to these common sounds that exceed 85 dB:

  • 90 dB: Hair dryer, lawn mower
  • 100 dB: MP3 Player at full volume
  • 110 dB: Concerts and sporting events
  • 130 dB: Ambulance

Your hearing can be permanently damaged after exposure from a single event of loud noise. Signs of damage from noise exposure include ringing in the ears, a plugged or “cotton feeling” in the ears and feeling as if others are mumbling while speaking. The use of some medications may make some individuals more susceptible to noise induced hearing loss.

You can prevent damage from noise by limiting your exposure to loud sounds. The following actions can reduce the likelihood of developing hearing loss from noise:

What is this ringing noise in my ears?

Tinnitus is the perception of a sound or noise in the ear or head.  Tinnitus is commonly reported as a ringing or bell noise, but it has also been described as clicking, roaring, hissing, static and “motor” noises. Tinnitus has unique variations, and reports from those afflicted with tinnitus vary greatly in terms of the sound and volume. Most people experience tinnitus in both ears, though it may occasionally be perceived in one ear only.

Some tinnitus coping strategies include:

My hearing loss isn't bad enough for hearing aids, is it?

After a hearing test, it is common to have questions about the results.  One that is frequently asked is “My hearing loss isn’t bad enough for hearing aids, is it?” In fact one young man asked me that very question today that made me want to share my answer here. This is a great question!  Read on for my answer.

What are some signs of hearing loss?

Hearing loss has been called an “invisible” health condition, as there are no outward physical signs associated with it. Hearing loss can occur gradually, often making it difficult to be aware of hearing loss if and when it occurs. Hearing loss negatively affects quality of life, the ability to communicate with others, and the awareness of one’s environment.

You could have hearing loss if:

Five Tips for Better Hearing

Did you know that portable music players produce sound at up to 100 decibels? That’s approaching the level of a jet plane taking off, which measures 120 decibels. Any volumes higher than 85 decibels can cause hearing loss if listened to for prolonged periods of time.

May is Better Hearing Month, celebrated by the American Academy of Audiology. It’s a great time to assess the health of your hearing, and recognize its importance in daily life.

Small changes in day-to-day activities can go a long way in maintaining good hearing in the future:

SNI Grand Rounds Series 2011 - Opportunities with Implantable Hearing Technologies

Thursday, January 6, 2011
7:30am - 8:30am
Swedish Education and Conference Center, Room B
Douglas Backous, Neurotology, Otology, Swedish Neuroscience Institute

Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, attendees will have an increased ability to:

  • Discuss the options for hearing restoration using osteointegrated implants and cochlear implants
  • Describe the role of auditory brainstem implants
  • Outline the indications for cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants (ABI)

SNI Grand Round Series is every 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month.

Results 22-28 of 28