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'hearing aids' posts

Watch Mrs. Day's cochlear implant activation - live!

Many people joined us last week to see Mrs. Day's cochlear implant surgery live-tweeted and Instagrammed. (You can click here to view a recap and see the pictures from Instagram.)

One of my favorite parts of the event was seeing the many thoughtful tweets & notes were sent in support of Mr. & Mrs. Day:

Some of the most frequently asked questions we received during the event were:

  1. Why are you doing this? (Answer - read this blog post, and watch this video to learn more about the inspiration behind the #SwedishHear web series.)

  2. Are you livestreaming Mrs. Day's cochlear implant activation?

We weren't originally planning to livestream the activation like we've done livestreams before - instead, we planned to host two, text-based live chats so people could type and read questions and engage directly with Dr. Backous, Stacey Watson (Mrs. Day's audiologist), and Karen Utter (President, Hearing Loss Association of Washington State).

Now we're doing both!

If you tune in....

Live-tweeting and Instagram Cochlear Implant/Hearing Restoration Surgery on October 2, 2012

You may have seen a post (Forbes) or two (CNET) in your various newsfeeds recently about the fact the Swedish is live-tweeting and Instagramming a cochlear implant (hearing restoration) surgery tomorrow, on October 2, 2012. (Check it out at www.swedish.org/swedishhear.)

A question we've gotten is why live-tweet or Instagram a surgery? Haven't you done that already? (Yes, we've used Twitter and video before (to educate patients about deep brain stimulation and knee replacement procedures, among others), but not Instagram.)

We're learning from our patients how hard it is to access information if you are deaf or have hearing loss, and, per a study in The Lancet, how this impacts the quality of healthcare. And so we decided to create additional resources to help raise awareness about the option of cochlear implants. (In this Mashable postDr. Backous said only 10% of people who qualify for cochlear implants end up receiving them.)

Here's an example of one of the many stories that inspired this series:

(For closed captioning press the CC button located in the middle of the action bar that appears at the bottom of the video when it is playing. For the best results, watch the video in full screen by pressing the full screen button located in the right hand corner of the action bar.)

People with hearing loss are not able to call on the phone to get more information or ask questions, so we decided to document via text (tweets) and images (Instagram photos) the cochlear implant procedure.

We're also hosting two text-based chats next Wednesday on October 10, 2012 (at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Pacific Time). The chats will enable patients and interested viewers to talk directly via the chat (text based - no audio) to Dr. Backous, audiologists, patients who have had the procedure, and patient advocacy groups. If you have unanswered questions about hearing loss or cochlear implants, we hope you'll join us for the discussion. (You can ...

(Click 'read more' to see a full recap from the live event)

Swedish to Host World’s First Live-Instagrammed, Live-Tweeted Hearing Restoration Surgery as Part of Month-Long Educational Web Series on Hearing Loss

SEATTLE, Sept. 26, 2012 - Swedish Medical Center and Douglas Backous, M.D., medical director of the Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute, will host the world’s first live-instagrammed and live-tweeted cochlear implant (hearing restoration) surgery on Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 7 a.m. Pacific Time (PT).

Should I consider hearing aids if I have hearing loss?

Persons with mild hearing loss often begin thinking about the possibility of seeking help from hearing aids. But they may do so grudgingly because they have heard stories from friends suggesting that hearing aids are never without complications. And it is true. Hearing aids always bring with them a set of advantages and disadvantages. And the degree to which a person will accept and enjoy their hearing aids depends a great deal upon how much the hearing loss is impinging on their enjoyment of life.

If you have been noticing ....

What is the difference between a Cochlear Implant and a Bone Anchored Implant?

When someone with a hearing loss comes into our Center, we talk with them about many different technology options to help them reconnect to their world. Most people are familiar with hearing aids. However, many have questions about a Cochlear Implant or a Bone Anchored Implant, often called a Baha, and wonder if these implants would be an option for them.

A Bone Anchored Implant is appropriate for someone where traditional hearing aids are not efficient because of draining ears or chronic infections, blockage or damage in the outer or middle ear or loss of all hearing in one ear such as following an acoustic tumor removal. Candidates have either a conductive hearing loss or a single sided deafness. The bone anchored implant uses ....

No One is Too Young for a Hearing Test!

How young is too young for a hearing test?

Your child is never too young for a hearing test! Different ages require special considerations, but children of all ages can have their hearing tested. Most children born in Washington State receive a hearing test before being discharged from the hospital.

Hearing tests are painless and encouraged for all newborns. According to statistics, approximately 3 in 1000 births will result in permanent hearing loss. Additionally, chronic ear infections, speech and language concerns and some illnesses and infections may lead your child to need a test.

You may remember having your hearing screened as a child at school. Hearing tests have come a long way from the traditional method of wearing headphones and raising a hand in response to a tone! Hearing is assessed using different tools and techniques based on the age of a child...

October is National Protect Your Hearing Month!

Noise exposure causes permanent hearing loss, and it is 100% preventable!

Hearing loss from noise exposure can occur at any age. Over 36 million Americans experience hearing loss… an amount over four times larger than the entire population of New York City! Over 18 million of those Americans with hearing loss are under the age of 65.

Today’s modern world is full of everyday objects that emit hazardous levels of noise. Exposure to noise louder than 85 dB is considered loud enough to potentially damage hearing. Consider your exposure to these common sounds that exceed 85 dB:

  • 90 dB: Hair dryer, lawn mower
  • 100 dB: MP3 Player at full volume
  • 110 dB: Concerts and sporting events
  • 130 dB: Ambulance

Your hearing can be permanently damaged after exposure from a single event of loud noise. Signs of damage from noise exposure include ringing in the ears, a plugged or “cotton feeling” in the ears and feeling as if others are mumbling while speaking. The use of some medications may make some individuals more susceptible to noise induced hearing loss.

You can prevent damage from noise by limiting your exposure to loud sounds. The following actions can reduce the likelihood of developing hearing loss from noise:

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