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'children' posts

Is it Magic?

What if I were to tell you that a new study was out about something that could make your child smarter, happier and healthier. There are no negative side effects. It’s painless. It’s not injected, ingested, or inhaled.
The benefits:

  • Problem-solving skills are honed
  • Cognitive ability is increased
  • Physical health is improved
  • Social skills are developed
  • If you participate, bonding is improved

This new wonder drug is not a drug at all. It’s something that humans and non-humans have been doing since forever...

Personal Listening Devices: Hip or Harmful?

If your child is one of the 304 million people who currently utilize an iPod, they could potentially be damaging their hearing. Research in recent years has demonstrated the startling trend that noise-induced hearing loss is on the rise, especially among children and teens.

Today, one in eight children aged 6-19 years has some degree of noise-induced hearing loss, which is twice the rate as seen in 1971. But noise isn’t a new phenomenon for kids. Historically, children have worked on farms, cut down trees, or fired guns without hearing protection. However, personal listening devices, like the iPod, are one of the most significant changes in our culture in the past 15-20 years, and they are here to stay.

Walk around the local park, ballfield, or school, and you will see numerous children and adults connected to earbuds. The extremely popular iPod has the capacity to produce an output of as much as 115 decibels at maximum volume, which is about as loud as a jet airplane taking off. At that level, it takes less than a few minutes to cause permanent damage. Of course, not everybody listens to his or her personal device at that volume. But in many instances the volume is turned up to combat background noise, and those earbuds placed directly into the ear can boost the volume as much as 6 to 9 decibels.

The damage that noise exposure causes is cumulative, permanent, and totally preventable. So what can we do?

A birthday and a backpack

As school starts, I am reminded of my youngest child’s first day of kindergarten.  The poor child had 5 stitches in his right heel from an unfortunate accident with a metal door plate.  He turned 6 years old a few days before school started and he was using a walker which gave a little extra stability than crutches.  He was standing in line with the other kids outside the kindergarten room.  All the parents were standing a couple of paces away from their kids  anxiously awaiting the bell to ring.

My husband and I were old hats at this as he is our third child.  The backpack was full, the emergency card was signed and his lunch was packed.  We did our part and now off he went.  I had a moment of misty-eyed “My baby is growing up” motherly emotions, but it passed and off we went to spend the day alone, childless and enjoying it.

In the afternoon, we returned to pick him up and the teacher was standing next to him.  As we walked up, excited to see him and hear how his first day of school went, the teacher stepped up to talk to us.  (Now after two other boys, I took this as a sign that there was a ‘talking to’ in my youngest son’s future.)  The teacher hugged me and said, “Thank you so much for preparing him for school.”  She had spent the day with kids yelling, misbehaving and jumping on the furniture.  My son, confined as he was because of his foot, was patient but helpful.  He waited until someone was available to help him to get his lunch or binder.  He waited until he was called on.  We couldn’t have been prouder of our son.

I hear so much about schools needing to do better.  They have tests to measure how the teachers are performing and there’s more and more scrutiny on the schools’ performance.  But what about the parents?  Where is the accountability for the parents to prepare their children?

We’ve created Head Start to try and catch the kids earlier in order to better prepare the kids for school, but preparing for school starts years earlier.

Here are a few things that parents can do to prepare their children for school:

Oh Baby! And Your Favorite Baby Is...

What a cutie! So adorable. How precious. These were just a few of the comments people mentioned when voting for their favorite Swedish/Edmonds baby. Last month we asked folks to select their favorite baby from four of our newborns featured on our Have a Happy Birth Day billboards in Edmonds, Mill Creek and along Mukilteo Speedway.

Rules and Chores

Everywhere we go, there are rules. The mall, at school, at work, at other people’s houses, etc. Our children learn early on that rules of acceptable behavior changes from place to place. We can yell and scream at the park but not at the grocery store. We teach our children to use ‘inside voices’ at the appropriate places and when it’s okay to run and play. The child whose parents have not taught them how to behave in the classroom (by taking them to the library) can have a rougher start at school. Ask any kindergarten teacher.

There seems to be a trend in parenting nowadays, where the parents want to give the child what they want, because they fear that their child will not like them.

Will not ‘like’ them? We’re not talking about Facebook ‘like’, we’re talking about genuine “my child won’t like me if I make them clean their room”.

Knock. Knock. Helloooo, parents? I’ve got a secret.

Summer Toy Drive for Pediatrics

I received this note from Evi Feltus, one of our amazing certified child life specialists:

"Swedish Pediatrics is holding a summer toy drive in July and August to replenish our treasure chest. Our amazing December toy drive sustained us for six months. We are looking for small toys valued under $10 to give out to children following difficult procedures.

Suggestions include:

  • My Little Ponies
  • Transformers
  • Hot Wheels
  • Barbies
  • Lego sets
  • etc.

We are also seeking interactive light-up toddler toys to distract young patients during their stay.

Donations can be dropped off at 9 East Pediatrics on the First Hill campus any time; please remember to fill out a donation form for tax purposes. You can also mail them to 747 Broadway Seattle, WA 98122. Please include your name, address and phone number for tax purposes.

Also, Swedish Medical Center Pediatrics is registered at Target (new window will open) if you are looking for additional items or suggestions.

Thank you for your continued support in providing a comforting environment for our patients!"

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(Questions about the toy drive? Email us at blog@swedish.org)

Safety tips for Fourth of July

Looking forward to some Fourth of July fun today? Have a great holiday and stay safe - watch this quick video to see three safety tips to keep in mind.

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