Tags
Blog

'Otolaryngology' posts

Chronic Snoring Solutions

Novelist Anthony Burgess once said, “Laugh and the world laughs with you, snore and you sleep alone”.

It’s a saying that hits home for many. Chronic snoring is an embarrassing problem for sufferers and a source of aggravation for their loved ones. From loving and maybe not so loving nudges to ear plugs, the weary-eyed partners of snorers often finally move on to seek shelter from the nightly onslaught in a far away quiet room in the house.

(Single folks are not immune as any overnight trips with friends, business partners, potential mates becomes a source of anxiety and embarrassment.)

Snoring occurs because during sleep, the muscles that helps to keep the airway open relaxes and the resulting narrowing and turbulence can cause vibrations that lead to snoring.

After a more serious condition called Obstructive Sleep Apnea has been sufficiently ruled out, try these steps to help with snoring:

How our voices work, and what to do when a voice doesn't work

A voice is an amazing thing.

With our voice, we convey information, express emotion and provide entertainment. We each have our own unique vocal ‘fingerprint’ that allows our friends to recognize us when we call them on the phone. We rely on our voice to win a debate, negotiate a contract, reassure a frightened child, and to celebrate a victory. Our tone conveys honesty, anger, happiness and fear. A song can inspire a spectrum of emotions, and recall past memories.

So how does our voice work? And what do you do when it doesn’t work?

Voice is produced when air is pushed up from the lungs to the level of the vocal cords. The vocal cords vibrate, producing sound. The vocal cords tense, lengthen and stretch to produce different frequencies. The sound is then shaped by the upper airway to add resonance and articulation resulting in speech or song.

The vocal cords themselves are thin bands of tissue over muscle. They sit within a framework that has a complex nerve supply and multiple paired muscles that allow very nuanced changes in vibration of the vocal cords, well demonstrated in professional singers.

Subtle differences in vibration or movement can ...

Swedish to Host Live Stream of Woman’s First Time Hearing in Five Years, Plus Live Text Chats

CochlearImplantMrsDay.jpgSEATTLE, Oct. 9, 2012 - On Tuesday, Oct. 2, Eleanor Day, 79, underwent a cochlear implant procedure at Swedish/Cherry Hill by Dr. Douglas Backous, medical director of the Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery. Her procedure was the world’s first live-instagrammed and live-tweeted cochlear implant (hearing restoration) surgery (click here to see a recap). This Wednesday, Oct. 10, Swedish will live stream Mrs. Day’s cochlear implant activation, in which she will potentially hear her husband’s voice without the help of hearing aids for the first time in five years. The Days have been married for 60 years.

Swedish to Host World’s First Live-Instagrammed, Live-Tweeted Hearing Restoration Surgery as Part of Month-Long Educational Web Series on Hearing Loss

SEATTLE, Sept. 26, 2012 - Swedish Medical Center and Douglas Backous, M.D., medical director of the Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute, will host the world’s first live-instagrammed and live-tweeted cochlear implant (hearing restoration) surgery on Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 7 a.m. Pacific Time (PT).

The Facts (and Fiction) About Ear Infections

The most common bacterial illness in children accounting for millions of doctor visits each year is otitis media — a middle ear infection. Acute otitis media typically occurs during or after a cold, upper respiratory infection or bout with allergies when the Eustachian tube that connects the middle ear to the throat becomes swollen and traps fluid. The fluid can cultivate bacteria or viruses, causing an infection.

Is there any way to protect your child from this potentially painful illness? How do you know if treatment is needed? We spoke with Swedish Otolaryngologist Linnea Peterson, M.D. who helped us separate fact from fiction regarding middle ear infections.

There is no way to avoid repeated ear infections; they’re just a part of childhood.

FICTION.

  • “Though it’s true that otitis media is one of the most common childhood ailments, parents can take steps to reduce their child’s risk,” says Dr. Peterson. “Consider....

Swedish Adds Seven New Doctors to its Medical Staff

Results 8-13 of 13