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Three summer safety tips - sunscreen, heat exhaustion, water

Summer is in full force! With sunny weather, long days, and loads of activities it can be easy to forget the basics to keep you and your children safe this summer. Here are an additional 3 summer safety tips (see Dr. Lee’s blog for tips on helmets, open windows, and fires):

1. Sunscreen

All children of any age need sunscreen if they’re going outside in the summer, even if it’s for a short period of time on an overcast day. Sunscreen is the best way to prevent sunburns and future skin cancer. Babies under 6 months of age should be kept out of direct sunlight as their skin is thinner and more sensitive. Sunscreen should be greater than 30 SPF and applied 30 minutes prior to exposure. Be sure to read the label to ensure it protects against both UVA and UVB rays. Most products need to be reapplied at least every 3 hours or sooner if your child has been wet or in the water. A “waterproof” sunscreen should be reapplied every 30 minutes while your child is in the water.

2. Heat exhaustion

Heat reactions in children are caused by high temperatures and excess water loss. Here are a few things you should remember:

Three summer safety tips

Summer is a wonderful time of year to be active outdoors. Sunny days provide so many fun activities for children to get exercise and stay healthy. While enjoying the warm weather, it’s important to be aware of potential injuries and take the necessary precautions to keep kids safe. Here are three summer safety tips to keep in mind:

Helmets

Kids should always wear a helmet while riding a bike, skateboard, scooter or in-line skates. Helmets can prevent traumatic brain injury and save lives!  A child should wear a helmet on short or long rides (no one can ever predict when an injury may occur).

Make sure the helmet meets safety standards and fits appropriately.  The helmet should be worn level on the head, covering the forehead.  The strap should be tightened enough to allow only two fingers between the chin and strap.  As a parent, make sure to be a good role model for your child and wear a helmet.

Open Windows

It is common to open windows during hot days to allow for cool fresh air.  For kids, the screen is a misleading barrier between the indoors and outdoors.  Screens are meant to pop off easily in the case of an emergency.  A child leaning against a screen ...

Improving the emergency department experience - and being recognized four years in a row

When you think of emergency rooms or emergency departments, “patient satisfaction” probably isn’t the first phrase that comes to mind. As an Emergency Medicine nurse, and having travel-nursed throughout the United States for the past 20 years, I’ve come to the realization that the traditional way of doing things is broken. In fact, about eight years ago, I was so disillusioned with my career that I decided to leave nursing.

But then, an amazing new opportunity came my way.

The nurse recruiter for the local agency I had been working with knew I was planning to leave the field, but informed me of an opportunity being developed at Swedish Medical Center in Issaquah. In short, Swedish was building a new freestanding Emergency Department (ED) that would offer something to patients that — at the time — was unheard of: an experience solely dedicated to patient satisfaction and respecting the patients’ time. This new way of thinking and new opportunity with Swedish re-energized my desire to stay in the field, and I accepted the challenge this job offered.

Fast-forward eight years and we’ve succeeded in our goal to make our Emergency Department experience second to none, and one that others try to emulate.

It’s not your typical ED.

Patients in the area know that when they come to the Swedish/Issaquah Emergency Department (and other Swedish Emergency Departments like Mill Creek and Redmond), they will experience a “no-wait” philosophy. You won’t sit around in a waiting room; rather, you’ll be taken directly to an exam room with your care started immediately. And, now we’re being nationally recognized for our achievements.

The Issaquah ED was ...

Steroid Injection Safety and Recent Spinal Meningitis Cases

During the past several weeks there has been much in the news about contaminated steroid compounds being used by pain management clinics around the country for steroid injection procedures. The result has been a significant number serious spinal meningitis cases, including some fatalities, in patients who received these injections. These tainted compounds have all been traced to a single company, the New England Compounding Center, located in Massachusetts. According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control) none of these compounds were shipped to Washington State. Nonetheless, this has raised questions of steroid injection safety among many patients who have received them as part of their pain management regime.

Steroid injections for the reduction of pain in specific areas have been used safely for decades by pain management specialists. They have been shown to be a viable and effective treatment option for a large number of patients who could not find adequate pain relief through other less invasive treatment methods. The issue surrounding the current crisis is not one of steroid injection safety or efficacy so much as it is one of ...

What to do when Seattle gets hot

The area is heating up. The National Weather Service has announced an excessive heat watch for this Thursday and Friday, with temperatures that will rise into the low to mid 90s. When outside temperatures are very high, the danger for heat-related illnesses rises. Older adults, young children, and people with mental illness and chronic diseases are at particularly high risk.

Here are some safety tips to avoid overheating and things to consider for the weekend:

Stay cool:

  • Spend more time in air conditioned places. If you don't have air conditioning, consider visiting a mall, movie theater or other cool public places.

  • Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun.

  • Dress in lightweight clothing.

  • Check up on your elderly neighbors and relatives and encourage them to take these precautions, too.

Drink liquids:

  • Drink plenty of water; this is very important. Avoid drinks with caffeine, alcohol and large amounts of sugar because they can actually de-hydrate your body.

  • Have a beverage with you as much as possible, and sip or drink frequently. Don't wait until you're thirsty to drink.

If you go outside:

  • Limit the time you're in direct sunlight.

  • Do not leave infants, children, people with mobility challenges and pets in a parked car, even with the window rolled down.

  • Avoid or reduce doing activities that are tiring, or take a lot of energy.

  • Do outdoor activities in the cooler morning and evening hours.

  • Avoid sunburn. Use a sunscreen lotion with a high SPF (sun protection factor) rating.

  • Wear a hat or use an umbrella for shade.

Summer, sun, and why you still need sunscreen in Seattle

Summer is almost here, so this is a good time to talk about sunscreens.

We all get excited when the sun comes out in our area, but it is always important to remember that everyone should avoid direct sun exposure when it is the harshest -between 10am and 4pm during the summer months,. Everyone should wear sunscreen, hats and covered clothing when exposed to the sun. Cloudy days do not offer too much protection as the UV rays can penetrate through the clouds and affect the skin the same way. Children and adolescents in particular should avoid tanning beds.

What you should know about different types of sunscreen:

How to avoid and care for cuts

It happens so quickly. You’re innocently chopping up vegetables for dinner when you find yourself on the receiving end of a cut — ouch! “Cuts are very common,” says Steven Rittenberg, M.D., who specializes in Internal Medicine at the Swedish Issaquah Primary Care Clinic. “However, there are some practical ways to prevent them, and some specific steps for treating them that can save you a trip to the doctor.”

Avoiding The “Ouch!”

Preventing cuts in the home is largely common sense, but life gets busy and we get careless, so here are a few reminders:

  • Keep knives sharp. Although this may sound counter-intuitive, a sharp knife slides more easily through an item avoiding a slip that may cut something you didn’t intend to cut, like your finger.
  • Pay attention. Resist the temptation to become distracted while using a knife.
  • Cut away from, not toward, yourself.
  • Don’t hold food that you are cutting; use a cutting board.
  • Don’t leave knives in dangerous places — loose in a drawer, in the sink, on the counter or facing up in the dishwasher — especially if you have children.
  • When handing someone a knife or sharp scissors, hold the flat part of the knife blade or closed blades of the scissors so they can grasp the handle.
  • Don’t pick up broken glass; sweep or vacuum it up thoroughly.

Treating It Right

When a cut does occur, the proper treatment will help to avoid infection or other complications:

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