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Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute Earns Highest National Ranking

Three-star rating awarded for exceptional cardiac surgery by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE            

Media Contacts

Clay Holtzman, 206-386-2748, clay.holtzman@swedish.org

SEATTLE — Dec. 17, 2013 — Swedish announced today that its Cardiac Surgery Program has been awarded a “three-star” rating from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). A longstanding surgical leader in the Pacific Northwest, Swedish earned the top honor in coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), aortic valve replacement surgery (AVR), as well as simultaneous surgery involving both procedures (AVR/CABG). 

Swedish is among only 23 hospitals (or the top 2 percent of hospitals) across the country to achieve these quality metrics. Results are based on clinical outcomes of nearly 1,000 cardiac surgery programs, representing approximately 90 percent of all cardiac surgery centers in the United States.

“We are pleased to receive the STS three-star ratings for our CABG, AVR and AVR/CABG programs. This places Swedish in the top two percent of cardiac surgery programs in the U.S.,” says Glenn R. Barnhart, M.D., chief and executive director for Cardiac Surgical Services at the Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute. “The STS’s comprehensive rating system allows individuals and medical practices to compare the quality of cardiac surgery at hospitals across the country. Most importantly, it allows centers to objectively evaluate how they can improve patient care in the future. Our entire team of cardiologists, cardiac anesthesiologists, physician assistants, intensive care nurses and physician specialists, and operating room staff has earned this achievement.”

Swedish Medical Center Foundation Receives $10.1 Million Gift from The Robert and Jean Reid Family Foundation

With its largest gift, the Campaign for Swedish surpasses $128 million

 

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   

Contact: Clay Holtzman, Swedish, 206-386-2748, clay.holtzman@swedish.org

SEATTLE – Dec. 11, 2013 – The Swedish Medical Center Foundation announced today that it is receiving a gift of $10.1 million from the estate of Robert and Jean Reid that will support advanced cancer and cardiac care at Swedish. Funds from the gift will be distributed to the Swedish Foundation over many years through The Robert and Jean Reid Family Foundation.

The gift — the largest made during the $100 million Campaign for Swedish — will help to establish a core component of the Swedish Cancer Institute’s (SCI) Personalized Medicine Program: The Robert and Jean Reid Family Innovative Therapeutics & Research Unit. The Reid Family Innovative Therapeutics & Research Unit will aim to evolve cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment through advanced clinical research. For example, Swedish will test patient genes to better understand how a cancerous tumor might respond to a specific treatment. This is one step toward personalizing treatments and improving patients’ lives and outcomes.

“The new Reid Family Innovative Therapeutics & Research Unit will help position SCI as a national and international thought leader in personalized, molecular-based cancer prevention and therapy,” said Dr. Thomas Brown, executive director of the Swedish Cancer Institute.

Quality & outcomes in cardiac surgery

Do all cardiac surgery programs have the same quality outcomes? This is an important question all consumers must ask themselves if they or their loved ones must undergo an operation on their heart. Heart surgery has become increasingly common in recent years. Earlier awareness on the part of physicians and patients, advanced diagnostic testing and an increasing aging population with the inherent prevalence of heart disease has led to this surge in cases. Additionally, cardiac surgical teams are now operating on patients with multiple medical problems and doing more complex operations. Even with these factors, outcomes for patients continue to be optimal at centers of excellence.

But for today’s consumer, how does one choose where to have heart surgery? There are numerous choices both locally and nationally for all metropolitan areas. The consumer must ask: how do I know I am going to get the best of care? Should I go to a center with a “national” reputation? Is it just the doctor that makes the difference or does it involve the entire team caring for me: cardiologists, cardiac anesthesiologists, physician assistants, ICU nursing and intensivists (doctors specialized in the care of the ICU patient), OR staff, etc.? All of these questions must be asked before considering such an important operation at any hospital by any surgical team.

One of the best yardsticks for outcomes to help patients choosing where to have their surgery is ...

Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute Cardiothoracic Surgeon, Patient Featured in Fortune Magazine Article on Robotic-Assisted Surgery

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SEATTLE, Jan. 22, 2013 - Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute cardiothoracic surgeon Eric Lehr, M.D., and one of his patients were interviewed for an article on robotic-assisted surgery that appears in the Feb. 11 issue of Fortune magazine.

Patients who inspire

We are living and working in a dynamic time for healthcare. New and exciting therapies are being developed and technology allows us to successfully, safely and effectively treat patients who previously would have died. However, we also face many challenges – such as a significant number of our patients who remain uninsured or underinsured.

And yet, there are a lot of things about the delivery of healthcare that separate it from being just a job, a source of income or a place to which to go every day. We assist, treat and care for patients and often times, become inspired by the people with whom we have regular contact. The sources of that inspiration are many and often include colleagues, ancillary staff and our patients.

The source of inspiration can be subtle and come unexpectedly. Such an instance happened to me just last week. I was asked to see a gentleman to evaluate an arteriovenous fistula (AV fistula) on his left arm which he uses four or five times a week for hemodialysis.

For those who don’t know, kidney failure is a very difficult problem to manage. When one gets to end stage kidney failure, dialysis treatment is necessary to stay alive.. One of the more common forms of access to the bloodstream for hemodialysis is to surgically connect a patient’s artery to a vein. This connection is usually done in the arm, and, when it functions properly, provides a high flow, superficial access site for fairly large needles which allow for blood to be taken out of the body and then, once cleansed, returned safely back into the body.

As I frequently try to do, I scanned the patient’s problem list in his electronic medical record so I would have at least some idea about his overall medical condition before the appointment. With a mental picture of a chronically ill and obese patient in mind, I entered the exam room to find a very fit looking gentleman waiting for me. I thought I had the wrong room...

Swedish Foundation Raises $100 Million to Help Meet Increasing Demand for Regional Health-Care Services

SEATTLE, Oct. 26, 2012 – Swedish Medical Center's seven-year fund-raising initiative, called The Campaign for Swedish, has raised $103 million, exceeding its initial $100 million fund-raising goal in approximately five-and-a-half years. The Campaign, launched to help improve patient care and treatment options throughout the Swedish system, is the largest fund-raising effort undertaken by the private, non-profit health system to date.

Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute Begins Offering a New, Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement Procedure

SEATTLE, Sept. 11, 2012 - For patients too sick to undergo open-heart surgery, a new, FDA-approved, minimally invasive aortic valve replacement procedure - now being performed by Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute (SHVI) providers - is offering new hope to patients whose life-threatening heart condition was previously inoperable.

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