Tags
Blog

'Heart & Vascular Institute' posts

When stress takes a toll on your heart

When you face danger, your body’s built-in alarm system triggers the production of adrenalin and cortisol. Adrenalin makes your heart beat faster and cortisol produces sugar to help you physically and mentally react. Your body returns to normal when the danger is over.

Unlike cavemen, barbarians and knights, we don’t face extreme danger very often. Unfortunately, every-day stress also triggers your alarm system.

Work. Commute. Kids. Relatives. Friends. Death of a loved one. Money. Everything in life can cause stress.

Stress takes a toll on your body — including your heart. Because stress can linger, your body continues to produce extra adrenalin and cortisol.

When your body’s alarm system doesn’t turn off, you may eat more, exercise less, lose sleep, argue more, forget things, get depressed, or smoke or drink more than usual. These things put an added burden on your heart and increase your risk of heart disease. Recent studies have shown that laughter and positive thinking promote heart health, while anger and job stress can increase the risk of heart attacks.

Here are some tips to protect your heart from stress:

Are you at risk for heart disease?

About half of all Americans have at least one of the three main risk factors for heart disease: high blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking. Other risk factors include diabetes, overweight/obesity, poor diet, inactivity, alcohol use and family history.

More people die from heart disease than any other medical condition. Controlling these risk factors is the most effective method of prevention.

What is your risk for heart disease? Find out by taking a free online Heart Risk Test.

If you need care, we have a team of cardiologists who can evaluate your risk, show you how to reduce that risk, and help you take the first steps to a healthy future.

Five tips for finding a cardiologist:

  1. Convenience. Care close to home or work makes life easier. Swedish has more than 35 cardiologists in 20 locations throughout the Greater Puget Sound area.

  2. Credentials. Cardiologists at Swedish are board certified by their national professional organizations.

  3. Quality. The American College of Cardiology has recognized Swedish cardiologists for being leaders in safe, high-quality care that reduces the risk of death among heart patients. Find out more about our quality outcomes.

  4. Reputation ...

Swedish Inviting 15 People to Become ‘Heart Surgeons for a Day’

Bellingham Herald Profiles Dr. Mark Reisman, First MitraClip Surgery in Washington

The Bellingham Herald recently published an interview with Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute’s Mark Reisman, M.D., as well as his patient Mavis Arfman, recipient of the first MitraClip heart valve device in Washington state. Arfman is a resident of Bellingham.

Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute Earns Highest National Ranking

Three-star rating awarded for exceptional cardiac surgery by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE            

Media Contacts

Clay Holtzman, 206-386-2748, clay.holtzman@swedish.org

SEATTLE — Dec. 17, 2013 — Swedish announced today that its Cardiac Surgery Program has been awarded a “three-star” rating from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). A longstanding surgical leader in the Pacific Northwest, Swedish earned the top honor in coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), aortic valve replacement surgery (AVR), as well as simultaneous surgery involving both procedures (AVR/CABG). 

Swedish is among only 23 hospitals (or the top 2 percent of hospitals) across the country to achieve these quality metrics. Results are based on clinical outcomes of nearly 1,000 cardiac surgery programs, representing approximately 90 percent of all cardiac surgery centers in the United States.

“We are pleased to receive the STS three-star ratings for our CABG, AVR and AVR/CABG programs. This places Swedish in the top two percent of cardiac surgery programs in the U.S.,” says Glenn R. Barnhart, M.D., chief and executive director for Cardiac Surgical Services at the Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute. “The STS’s comprehensive rating system allows individuals and medical practices to compare the quality of cardiac surgery at hospitals across the country. Most importantly, it allows centers to objectively evaluate how they can improve patient care in the future. Our entire team of cardiologists, cardiac anesthesiologists, physician assistants, intensive care nurses and physician specialists, and operating room staff has earned this achievement.”

Swedish Medical Center Foundation Receives $10.1 Million Gift from The Robert and Jean Reid Family Foundation

With its largest gift, the Campaign for Swedish surpasses $128 million

 

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   

Contact: Clay Holtzman, Swedish, 206-386-2748, clay.holtzman@swedish.org

SEATTLE – Dec. 11, 2013 – The Swedish Medical Center Foundation announced today that it is receiving a gift of $10.1 million from the estate of Robert and Jean Reid that will support advanced cancer and cardiac care at Swedish. Funds from the gift will be distributed to the Swedish Foundation over many years through The Robert and Jean Reid Family Foundation.

The gift — the largest made during the $100 million Campaign for Swedish — will help to establish a core component of the Swedish Cancer Institute’s (SCI) Personalized Medicine Program: The Robert and Jean Reid Family Innovative Therapeutics & Research Unit. The Reid Family Innovative Therapeutics & Research Unit will aim to evolve cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment through advanced clinical research. For example, Swedish will test patient genes to better understand how a cancerous tumor might respond to a specific treatment. This is one step toward personalizing treatments and improving patients’ lives and outcomes.

“The new Reid Family Innovative Therapeutics & Research Unit will help position SCI as a national and international thought leader in personalized, molecular-based cancer prevention and therapy,” said Dr. Thomas Brown, executive director of the Swedish Cancer Institute.

Quality & outcomes in cardiac surgery

Do all cardiac surgery programs have the same quality outcomes? This is an important question all consumers must ask themselves if they or their loved ones must undergo an operation on their heart. Heart surgery has become increasingly common in recent years. Earlier awareness on the part of physicians and patients, advanced diagnostic testing and an increasing aging population with the inherent prevalence of heart disease has led to this surge in cases. Additionally, cardiac surgical teams are now operating on patients with multiple medical problems and doing more complex operations. Even with these factors, outcomes for patients continue to be optimal at centers of excellence.

But for today’s consumer, how does one choose where to have heart surgery? There are numerous choices both locally and nationally for all metropolitan areas. The consumer must ask: how do I know I am going to get the best of care? Should I go to a center with a “national” reputation? Is it just the doctor that makes the difference or does it involve the entire team caring for me: cardiologists, cardiac anesthesiologists, physician assistants, ICU nursing and intensivists (doctors specialized in the care of the ICU patient), OR staff, etc.? All of these questions must be asked before considering such an important operation at any hospital by any surgical team.

One of the best yardsticks for outcomes to help patients choosing where to have their surgery is ...

Results 1-7 of 51