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'Cardiac Surgery' posts

Treating Cardiac Arrhythmias with catheter ablation

Cardiac catheter ablation is an invasive procedure done to treat abnormal rapid or irregular heart rhythms (arrhythmias). Ablation can be used to treat both supraventricular arrhythmias coming from the upper chambers of the heart (atria) including paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), atrial flutter, and atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias coming from the lower chambers (ventricles).


Different types of catheter ablation for cardiac arrhythmias

“Ablation” refers to localized destruction of tissue, so the area that is being ablated needs to be carefully targeted and the ablation closely controlled. The precise areas targeted for ablation depend on the type of arrhythmia, which sometimes is known before the procedure, but often needs to be clarified or confirmed invasively during the procedure. That being said, not all tachycardias are amenable to ablation or even require treatment, but when non-drug treatment of appropriate tachycardias is appropriate, catheter ablation can be an excellent option.

Ablation can be performed either with ...

Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute Earns Highest National Ranking

Three-star rating awarded for exceptional cardiac surgery by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE            

Media Contacts

Clay Holtzman, 206-386-2748, clay.holtzman@swedish.org

SEATTLE — Dec. 17, 2013 — Swedish announced today that its Cardiac Surgery Program has been awarded a “three-star” rating from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). A longstanding surgical leader in the Pacific Northwest, Swedish earned the top honor in coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), aortic valve replacement surgery (AVR), as well as simultaneous surgery involving both procedures (AVR/CABG). 

Swedish is among only 23 hospitals (or the top 2 percent of hospitals) across the country to achieve these quality metrics. Results are based on clinical outcomes of nearly 1,000 cardiac surgery programs, representing approximately 90 percent of all cardiac surgery centers in the United States.

“We are pleased to receive the STS three-star ratings for our CABG, AVR and AVR/CABG programs. This places Swedish in the top two percent of cardiac surgery programs in the U.S.,” says Glenn R. Barnhart, M.D., chief and executive director for Cardiac Surgical Services at the Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute. “The STS’s comprehensive rating system allows individuals and medical practices to compare the quality of cardiac surgery at hospitals across the country. Most importantly, it allows centers to objectively evaluate how they can improve patient care in the future. Our entire team of cardiologists, cardiac anesthesiologists, physician assistants, intensive care nurses and physician specialists, and operating room staff has earned this achievement.”

Quality & outcomes in cardiac surgery

Do all cardiac surgery programs have the same quality outcomes? This is an important question all consumers must ask themselves if they or their loved ones must undergo an operation on their heart. Heart surgery has become increasingly common in recent years. Earlier awareness on the part of physicians and patients, advanced diagnostic testing and an increasing aging population with the inherent prevalence of heart disease has led to this surge in cases. Additionally, cardiac surgical teams are now operating on patients with multiple medical problems and doing more complex operations. Even with these factors, outcomes for patients continue to be optimal at centers of excellence.

But for today’s consumer, how does one choose where to have heart surgery? There are numerous choices both locally and nationally for all metropolitan areas. The consumer must ask: how do I know I am going to get the best of care? Should I go to a center with a “national” reputation? Is it just the doctor that makes the difference or does it involve the entire team caring for me: cardiologists, cardiac anesthesiologists, physician assistants, ICU nursing and intensivists (doctors specialized in the care of the ICU patient), OR staff, etc.? All of these questions must be asked before considering such an important operation at any hospital by any surgical team.

One of the best yardsticks for outcomes to help patients choosing where to have their surgery is ...

A New Contribution to Cardiothoracic Surgical Education

There is nothing more satisfying for a clinician than when a patient understands their ailment, comprehends the nature of the pathology involved, and is clear on the treatment/procedure they are about to undergo. This "satisfaction" is a joyous emotion reflecting successful communication -- it is what parents feel when their children first begin to read, and what educators aspire to when their students master the material at hand.

It is a privilege to share our most recent contribution to the cardiothoracic surgery community, the TSRA Primer of Cardiothoracic Surgery...

 

Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute Cardiothoracic Surgeon, Patient Featured in Fortune Magazine Article on Robotic-Assisted Surgery

Fortune-Robotic-Surgery.jpg

SEATTLE, Jan. 22, 2013 - Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute cardiothoracic surgeon Eric Lehr, M.D., and one of his patients were interviewed for an article on robotic-assisted surgery that appears in the Feb. 11 issue of Fortune magazine.

Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute Begins Offering a New, Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement Procedure

SEATTLE, Sept. 11, 2012 - For patients too sick to undergo open-heart surgery, a new, FDA-approved, minimally invasive aortic valve replacement procedure - now being performed by Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute (SHVI) providers - is offering new hope to patients whose life-threatening heart condition was previously inoperable.

Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute Electrophysiologist Interviewed for KING 5 TV Story on LifeVest

SEATTLE, March 30, 2012 - Seattle NBC affiliate KING Television (Channel 5) aired a story during their 5 p.m. PT newscast tonight about a relatively new, FDA-approved medical device called LifeVest ®. The wearable defibrillator is a treatment option for sudden cardiac arrest that offers patients advanced protection and monitoring as well as improved quality of life.

LifeVest is the first wearable defibrillator. Unlike an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), the LifeVest is worn outside the body rather than implanted in the chest. This device continuously monitors the patient's heart with dry, non-adhesive sensing electrodes to detect life-threatening abnormal heart rhythms. If a life-threatening rhythm is detected, the device alerts the patient prior to delivering a treatment shock, and thus allows a conscious patient to delay the treatment shock. If the patient becomes unconscious, the device releases a Blue™ gel over the therapy electrodes and delivers an electrical shock to restore normal rhythm.

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