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'OB/GYN Clinics at Swedish ' posts

What you should know about Long Acting Reversible Contraceptives or IUDs

Does it seem that more of your friends are using IUDs or contraceptive implants?  IUDs, intrauterine devices, and contraceptive implants are becoming more popular in the United States.  In this post, we will discuss these birth control methods and why they are gaining in popularity. 

IUDs are plastic devices that are placed in the uterus by a healthcare provider.  There are three products available in the U.S.:

How to get the most out of your OB/GYN appointment

Unless you are having a baby, seeing an OB/GYN often makes women feel very nervous.  This can lead to forgetting questions, forgetting important information about your condition and leaving feeling dissatisfied.

In order to get the most out of your appointment here are some simple tips:

1. Come prepared!
  • Bring a list of your medications; this can help us be sure that anything we prescribe will be safe for you.  Your problem may also be related to your medication – for example, blood thinners can cause heavy periods.
  • Know your family history. Things that are important for OB/GYNs to know include family member with blood clots, recurrent (more than 3) miscarriages, family members with cancer of the breast, ovary, uterus or colon (bowel.)  It is also helpful to know the age they were diagnosed.
  • Bring a list of questions! The more you ask, the more you’ll know.  We want our patients to be well informed so that we can help you make the right treatment plan for you. Also, there may not be time to go over everything in one appointment so make sure you start with what is important to you.
2. Check your inhibitions at the door!
  • Trust me, we have seen and heard everything and there is very little than can shock us! It is important that you are open and honest so that we can make sure we understand exactly what is going on to come up with the right diagnosis. 
  • It is likely that ...

Why pregnant women should receive flu vaccine and pertussis booster

Why do we recommend that pregnant women receive both the flu vaccine and the pertussis booster during pregnancy? Here are a few reasons:
 
The influenza virus, better known as the flu, has been proven over and over to have the potential to cause serious disease in pregnancy.  That includes an increased risk that when pregnant women “catch” the flu, they may require admission to the intensive care unit, require a ventilator and, less commonly, even death.  It’s serious.   Babies of women who are infected with the flu during pregnancy are more likely to be born prematurely and are at increased risk for stillbirth.

We recommend the flu vaccine at any point in pregnancy and offer the single dose, preservative free vaccine in our office to all pregnant women (with the exception of those who have a medical reason not to get it.)  A common misconception is that the vaccine causes the flu - it does not.  Another misconception is that it is not safe for the developing baby to be exposed to the vaccine itself or the immune response it generates.  There is no evidence to support this fear in almost 50 years of administrating this vaccine and close follow up of those receiving it.

We recommend the flu shot, which is an inactivated virus. The Flumist is a live attenuated virus that is not recommended in pregnancy.

Your family members should also receive the vaccine as they can pass the flu on to a newborn who has not yet gotten the vaccine.  Babies can suffer severe complications if they are infected with the virus before they can receive the vaccine.
 
The other vaccine we recommend during pregnancy is the Tdap booster.  The benefit of the pertussis booster outweighs any perceived risk.  Pertussis, or the whooping cough, is at epidemic levels especially on the west coast including Washington State.  That may be  ...

Swedish Babies in 2013

Odds are that if you live in or around Seattle, either you or your children were born at a Swedish hospital. And after last year, those odds are even greater after our nurses and doctors delivered a record 9,014 babies in 2013.

Last year included a record number of births at Swedish Issaquah (1,149) and Swedish Ballard (1,022).

We attribute last year’s growth to our excellent reputation in the community as well as our outstanding ability to provide our patients with a safe, convenient and comfortable birthing experience. Last year we expanded our range of offerings for families when we opened our new Lytle Center for Pregnancy & Newborns and our Level II nursery at Swedish/Issaquah.

Now for some fun facts:

  • August saw ...

When should I have my first pelvic exam?

A good time to schedule a visit with a gynecologist (or women’s health specialist) is when you first have problems or concerns with menstrual periods, including premenstrual moods, acne around menses, vaginal discharge or any other cyclic discomfort. That appointment will involve a conversation about what is bothering you and may include a pelvic exam or may not.  Likely the doctor will ask you questions and together you will decide whether or not an exam is necessary.

Around age 13, even if you feel fine and are just wondering when you should come in for a routine exam, is a good time to schedule an appointment to discuss your female health, contraception and screening for sexually transmitted infection.  Vaccinations may be recommended if you have not already received routine immunizations. Some of the things that may be discussed include your health history, family health history, your habits with regard to diet and exercise, smoking or any drug use and sexual activities.  Some of these topics are things you may find difficult to discuss with friends and family.  In the gynecologists office we talk about those things all of the time!  Often we give you pamphlets or point to online resources for you.  The conversation is confidential and it is okay for you to remind the health care provider that you wish it to remain confidential. 

What is a pelvic exam and why might I need one?

A pelvic exam is ...

Swedish Opens First, All-Inclusive Childbirth Resource and Education Center

Swedish announced that the Lytle Center for Pregnancy & Newborns, a first-of-its-kind center equipped to accommodate mom, baby and a modern family’s every need, opened today. 

Shortened maternity stays, reduced family and community networks and the rising number of working moms have created a need for expanded access to comprehensive pregnancy as well as postpartum care and support services.

For the first time, parents and their families can access these care and support needs, all in one convenient, well-thought-out location—the Lytle Center. The center includes:

New Level II Nursery Opens at Swedish/Issaquah July 8; Service Provides Premature, Sick Infants with Special Care, Support

ISSAQUAH, Wash., June 20, 2013 — Swedish/Issaquah will open its new Level II Nursery on Monday, July 8, having recently received state approval to provide this vital service to the community. The Level II Nursery allows for premature and ill babies — born as early as 34 weeks gestational age — to stay at Swedish/Issaquah to receive the specialized, around-the-clock care they need from a specially trained team of experts.

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