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'Neuroscience Institute' posts

Research and progress for progressive Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

I am delighted to write the blog over the Progressive MS session that was given at ECTRIMS 2013.  Much emphasis has been given to the need for more research in the fields of progressive MS.  The majority of MS patients fit into this broad category: primary progressive MS, secondary progressive MS, and progressive relapsing forms of the disease.  During a session devoted to progressive MS, leaders in the field discussed several initiatives underway to address the challenges presented by these forms of the disease. 

Rehabilitation is a mainstay and key to improving the lives of patients with progressive MS. Many patients describe their progression in terms of mobility decline, which is a major target of improvement in rehabilitation programs.

The first session was devoted to confusion surrounding the definition of “progression in MS.”  We use ...

Swedish Neuroscience Institute Seeks Participants for Trial of an Investigational Technology to Treat Essential Tremor

One of only four sites in U.S. to treat neurological disorder
 

SEATTLE, Sept. 26, 2013 – Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is looking for patients willing to participate in a study of an investigational technology to treat essential tremor, a common neurological disorder, with sound rather than surgery.

An estimated 10 million people in the U.S have essential tremor (ET), which causes a rhythmic shaking or trembling of hands and arms but can also affect the head, legs and other parts of the body. It affects one out of every 25 adults over 40 and can be confused with but is different from better-known Parkinson’s disease, which is actually much less prevalent. ET produces disabilities that hamper basic daily activities and worsens over time, with severely affected patients unable to feed or care for themselves.

Dr. Ryder Gwinn, the Principle Investigator for the study at SNI who has utilized other treatments for patients with essential tremor, said focused ultrasound could be an option for many of these patients. For example, medication has been shown to be ineffective for up to half of all ET patients.

Proteomics identifies protein changes in multiple sclerosis and CIS

A recent study published in the journal PLOS ONE found differences in protein levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) among people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS).

Using the relatively new field of proteomics, researchers were able to identify each individual protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)—86 total—and compares their levels among people with relapsing MS, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and healthy individuals. People with RRMS had different levels of 20 proteins compared to people with CIS. Seventy five percent of those proteins related to neurons (rather than myelin). Changes were particularly notable for proteins related to neurons in participants with CIS.

This study is one of many MS studies coming from the relatively new field of proteomics. This field uses ...

No-Cook Meals for Multiple Sclerosis - Week 4: Southwest Chop Salad

It may be the last official week of summer, but this no-cook meal for multiple sclerosis can be enjoyed during any season. This salad’s simple ingredients are available year-round. Make it now and enjoy it again when you need a break from winter weather.

Recipe: Southwest Chop Salad

 

Super Food: Avocado

The oleic acid in avocados will help keep you satisfied and full. Oleic acid tells the body to ...

No-Cook Meals for Multiple Sclerosis - Week 3: Tuna and Fennel Sandwiches

It’s back-to-school time and this week’s no-cook meal for multiple sclerosis is a twist on an American childhood mainstay; the tuna fish sandwich. Instead of mayonnaise and pickles, this meal uses flavorful olive oil, tangy vinegar and fresh crunchy vegetables.

Recipe: Tuna and Fennel Sandwiches

 

Super food ingredient: Chunk light tuna

There is strong evidence that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish can lower triglycerides and blood pressure. Make sure to choose “chunk light tuna,” which is three times lower in mercury than the solid white or albacore tuna.

Also choose water-packed tuna over oil packed. Some of the omega-3 fatty acids leak into the added oil and will be lost when you drain the can. Because water...

Is someone with multiple sclerosis an MSer?

A survey from the United Kingdom published in the Journal of MS and Related Disorders polled 396 people with multiple sclerosis (MS) about how they would like to be referred to in conversation. The winning term ("MSer") was supported by 43% of the respondents, while "person with MS" received 34% votes. When a United States-based blog reported on the story, 2 out of 3 respondents disagreed.

What do you think? Comment below with your preference and why.

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(Ed. note: You can comment anonymously - feel free to use your initials if you are more comfortable sharing that way.)

No-Cook Meals for Multiple Sclerosis Week 2: Gazpacho

Last week, I shared the first of a few recipes that are easy to prepare, and don’t require heating up the kitchen on a warm summer day.

Heat sensitivity can be a serious issue for people living with multiple sclerosis (MS), causing a temporary worsening, or exacerbation, of their symptoms.

This week’s no-cook meal is a tomato-based soup that is traditionally served cold. It’s chilled serving temperature makes it a popular dish for summer months and it’s veggie content makes it a nutrient-packed part of your meal.

Recipe: Gazpacho

 

Super food ingredient: Olive oil

Olive oil is ...

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