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'Neuroscience Institute' posts

Swedish Receives $2.5 Million Grant from the Ivy Foundation to Advance Brain Cancer Research

SEATTLE, Nov. 29, 2012 - Swedish Medical Center announced today that the Ben and Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment (Ivy Center) will receive an additional $2.5 million grant from the Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation (Ivy Foundation). The grant, the second received from the Ivy Foundation in three years, will be used to identify new drugs with potential for clinical use in brain cancer treatment.

Vision Problems and Pituitary Tumors

Nearly everyone notices vision problems, especially as you get older. In the great majority of cases, this is simply due to changes in the focusing capacity of the lens, and the solution is wearing glasses. However, it isn’t safe to assume that this is always the case. It’s important to have your eyes examined by a trained professional to determine whether something more serious is affecting the eye or the vision nerve. 

In the video below you’ll learn about something I commonly see in my practice – vision loss from a tumor of the pituitary gland that is putting pressure on the vision nerves. This type of vision loss typically reduces the peripheral vision to either side. This can be diagnosed by a test at the eye doctor called Visual Fields. As in this case, a relatively simple operation can reverse the vision problem before it becomes permanent. The key is early diagnosis. If you notice that your peripheral vision is affected, ask your eye doctor to check visual fields.

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SNI Research Aims to Expand Cerebral Palsy Therapy Options

Before they learn to crawl or walk, about 10,000 babies every year in the United States will develop a condition that will change how they will do just that. Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurological condition caused by a brain injury before birth, during delivery or before a child’s second birthday. An estimated 800,000 Americans live with CP.

The most common symptom in CP is spasticity, an increase in muscle tension that impairs proper movement. Abnormal postures or movements, weakness or loss of muscle control and rigidity are also part of the constellation of CP signs and symptoms. While physical therapy remains the cornerstone for treatment, new medications and therapies for CP are being developed to help improve and manage symptoms.

Currently, Swedish Neuroscience Institute is participating in a study to determine the safety and tolerability of one such medication. Dalfampridine (AMPYRA ®) is a medication currently used to help improve walking speed in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. This phase I clinical trial aims to evaluate AMPYRA’s® safety, tolerability and its effect on sensorimotor function of adults with CP. The study will look at how single and multiple doses of the medication have on CP patients, including:

  • Hand strength
  • Manual dexterity
  • Walking speed
  • Gait

There is no cure for cerebral palsy. Therapies for CP ...

Swedish Foundation Raises $100 Million to Help Meet Increasing Demand for Regional Health-Care Services

SEATTLE, Oct. 26, 2012 – Swedish Medical Center's seven-year fund-raising initiative, called The Campaign for Swedish, has raised $103 million, exceeding its initial $100 million fund-raising goal in approximately five-and-a-half years. The Campaign, launched to help improve patient care and treatment options throughout the Swedish system, is the largest fund-raising effort undertaken by the private, non-profit health system to date.

Swedish to Host Live Stream of Woman’s First Time Hearing in Five Years, Plus Live Text Chats

CochlearImplantMrsDay.jpgSEATTLE, Oct. 9, 2012 - On Tuesday, Oct. 2, Eleanor Day, 79, underwent a cochlear implant procedure at Swedish/Cherry Hill by Dr. Douglas Backous, medical director of the Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery. Her procedure was the world’s first live-instagrammed and live-tweeted cochlear implant (hearing restoration) surgery (click here to see a recap). This Wednesday, Oct. 10, Swedish will live stream Mrs. Day’s cochlear implant activation, in which she will potentially hear her husband’s voice without the help of hearing aids for the first time in five years. The Days have been married for 60 years.

Swedish-Affiliated Neurologist Interviewed about Results of New Study on 'Mini' Strokes and Clot-Busting Drugs

SEATTLE, Oct. 8, 2012 - A short video news story on new research around the use of clot-busting dugs to treat 'mini' strokes was recently posted on the national news sites EverydayHealth.com and AOL.com. The two-minute long piece features an interview with William Likosky, M.D., medical director of Swedish Neuroscience Institute's Stroke Program, as well as a local stroke patient.

Swedish to Host World’s First Live-Instagrammed, Live-Tweeted Hearing Restoration Surgery as Part of Month-Long Educational Web Series on Hearing Loss

SEATTLE, Sept. 26, 2012 - Swedish Medical Center and Douglas Backous, M.D., medical director of the Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute, will host the world’s first live-instagrammed and live-tweeted cochlear implant (hearing restoration) surgery on Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 7 a.m. Pacific Time (PT).

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