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'Pregnancy & Childbirth' posts

New options for genetic testing in pregancy

Congratulations!  You just found out you are pregnant and so many things start going through your mind.  When you’re not dry heaving or completely exhausted you start planning for your exciting future but in the back of your mind you wonder… how do I know everything is okay with my baby?

We are entering an exciting time in the field of obstetrics that involves less invasive and more accurate options for genetic testing in pregnancy.  ACOG, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, recommends that all women, regardless of maternal age, be offered prenatal testing for chromosomal abnormalities. 

For quite sometime our options for this testing have been somewhat stagnant.  We have offered noninvasive risk profiling that involves a mixture of blood tests and ultrasounds at various times in the first and second trimesters to help evaluate the baby’s risk for Down syndrome or other lethal chromosomal abnormalities.  Depending on how these tests are processed, the sensitivity ranges from 80-95% with about a 5% false positive rate.  They are fairly accurate at identifying babies at higher risk, but can have false positive results (meaning an abnormal result followed by more invasive testing that shows normal results but of course this causes a lot of worry for the patient). 

Obviously we want to be able to offer testing that has a high rate of detection and a low rate of false positives.  More invasive testing is often offered also.  This testing involves removing a sample of placental cells called chorionic villus sampling, or removing a sample of fetal cells from the amniotic fluid called amniocentesis.  These cells are then analyzed for chromosomal abnormalities.  Although these invasive tests are the most accurate, they do carry a small risk of miscarriage or fetal loss. 

Fortunately, new testing has come out on the market called cell free fetal DNA testing.  This is ....

Swedish Opens First, All-Inclusive Childbirth Resource and Education Center

Swedish announced that the Lytle Center for Pregnancy & Newborns, a first-of-its-kind center equipped to accommodate mom, baby and a modern family’s every need, opened today. 

Shortened maternity stays, reduced family and community networks and the rising number of working moms have created a need for expanded access to comprehensive pregnancy as well as postpartum care and support services.

For the first time, parents and their families can access these care and support needs, all in one convenient, well-thought-out location—the Lytle Center. The center includes:

New Level II Nursery Opens at Swedish/Issaquah July 8; Service Provides Premature, Sick Infants with Special Care, Support

ISSAQUAH, Wash., June 20, 2013 — Swedish/Issaquah will open its new Level II Nursery on Monday, July 8, having recently received state approval to provide this vital service to the community. The Level II Nursery allows for premature and ill babies — born as early as 34 weeks gestational age — to stay at Swedish/Issaquah to receive the specialized, around-the-clock care they need from a specially trained team of experts.

Mindfulness for Childbirth and Parenting

What is mindfulness?

Mindfulness is defined by Nancy Bardacke, author of Mindful Birthing, as "the awareness that arises from paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgementally. It is cultivated through meditation practice and can help you navigate the uncharted waters that lie ahead with more joy, kindness, awareness, calm and wisdom than you might have otherwise. Mindfulness is a universal capacity of the human mind, but unless we intentionally choose to cultivate it, we can spend much of our lives on automatic pilot, sleepwalking through life rather than being fully present for it."

What makes mindfulness helpful for pregnancy? Or parenting?

"Taking the time to learn mindfulness through meditation practice now can help you more skillfully manage the inevitable stresses of pregnancy and the irreducible element of uncertainty of the birthing process. More than that, mindfulness meditation can help you manage the intense sensations of childbirth we usually call pain, increasing your confidence and decreasing the fears that so often accompany this profound journey into the unknown. And mindfulness can help you cultivate lifelong inner skills for healthy living, wise parenting, and loving partnership. " (- Nancy Bardacke)

How do I learn how to meditate to cultivate mindfulness?

The best way to learn is by taking a mindful birthing weekend workshop or 9 week course which are just now becoming available in our area (click here for a flyer about a weekend workshop coming up in March).  Other ways to learn are...

Minor & James Medical OB/GYN Interviewed on KING 5 TV about Preparing for Motherhood

SEATTLE, Feb. 19, 2013 - As part of a week-long series on childbirth-related topics, KING 5 TV's (NBC) morning newscast featured a live, in-studio interview about preparing for motherhood with Minor & James Medical OB/GYN Robin Cole, M.D.

Swedish Issaquah First Hospital in State to Offer Bavia Postnatal Massage Services

Bavia-provided-photo.jpgISSAQUAH, WASH., Feb. 1, 2013 – Childbirth is often painful and always unpredictable, but postpartum recovery doesn’t have to be. New mothers can now leave the hospital even happier with Postnatal Body Therapy™ by Bavia™. This postnatal massage service is now available at Swedish/Issaquah.

Eating for Two? Nutrition in Pregnancy

You may have many questions when you find out that you are pregnant, but some of the most common concerns revolve around nutrition and food safety. These are some basic guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to get you started. As always, your situation may be different and so always discuss specifics with your provider.

How much weight should I gain?

This depends on your pre-pregnancy BMI (body mass index - a calculation from your height and weight). In general, however, if your pre-pregnancy weight is normal you should gain between 25 to 35 pounds. Most women stay within this goal with an increase of only 300 extra calories a day (equal to about 2 tablespoons of peanut butter and one slice of whole wheat bread). If you are underweight, however, you may need to gain more weight, and if you are overweight, less. Your doctor can help you to come up with a specific weight goal.

What foods can't I eat?

Alcohol, of course, is not recommended in pregnancy, but there are other restrictions. Other foods can put you at risk for listeriosis, a bacterial infection that causes miscarriage and stillbirth. Unpasteurized milk and cheese can put you at risk, as can raw or undercooked shellfish, meat, or poultry. Deli meats and hotdogs are okay if they are heated until they are steaming hot.

What about fish?

That depends on the fish! Certain large fish may contain too much mercury to be safely eaten in pregnancy. High levels of mercury exposure in pregnancy may lead to nervous system damage in the unborn child. If you are pregnant you should avoid eating Shark, Tilefish, Swordfish, and King Mackerel and limit your intake of albacore tuna to 6 ounces a week.

You may eat fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury, but no more than 12 ounces a week. If you want to eat fish caught by family or friends from local waterways check for local advisories first, and do not eat more than 6 ounces.

Do I need to take extra vitamins or supplements?

It is important to take ...

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