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'cancer' posts

A New, Effective Oral Treatment Option Before Chemo for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

Discussing a new, effective oral treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer prior to receiving chemotherapy:

 

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What is the BAC subtype of Lung Cancer and Why Does it Matter?

On scans, BAC looks like whispy areas on a scan rather than a solid mass, and doesn't usually invade other parts of the body. It is often limited just to the lungs. Here is more information about the BAC subtype of lung cancer, treatment options, and what you should know:

 

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Patient Education Classes at Swedish Cancer Institute

I know how overwhelming it can be when someone is diagnosed with cancer. A wealth of information is presented to you and a lot of it can be hard to remember. Yes, resource packets are wonderful tools and information sheets are extremely useful but sometimes sifting through all of the documents can be cumbersome, especially when you have specific questions. For this reason, the Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI) wants to ensure that you have access to education and information in a way that works for you.

SCI offers education programs to assist you, your family members and your caregivers in making treatment decisions, managing your symptoms, and accessing programs to help your mind, body and spirit to heal.

One of the programs is patient education classes. These classes offer practical tips that you and your family members can take home with you. The classes are intended to complement your treatment here at Swedish but also provide an opportunity where you can ask questions in a safe and secure environment.

Whether you are interested in exploring how the healing powers of art-making can help during your experience with cancer treatment or learning how naturopathic medicine complements conventional cancer treatments (or maybe you want to gain skills and confidence in creating hair alternatives) – whatever the area of focus is, we have classes that fit your needs:

Swedish Cancer Institute Classes: Breathing for Stress Reduction and Yoga for Relaxation and Stress Relief

If you are a patient, caregiver, family member, or friend – living with cancer can be stressful and often exhausting. Learning to manage stress and to relax the body can help you and your loved ones thrive through cancer. Yoga and deep breathing exercises are just two forms of stress relief that many individuals benefit from. The practice of these two exercises help to promote healing, while connecting the body, mind and spirit.

Here at the Swedish Cancer Institute, we offer yoga classes every quarter to help patients and family members undergoing treatment heal. Check out this quarters classes, Breathing for Stress Reduction and Yoga for Relaxation and Stress Relief to learn more about how yoga can improve your experience during cancer treatment:

What is the Utility of Serum Tumor Markers in Lung Cancer?

Should serum tumor markers be used to guide treatment decisions for lung cancer?

 

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Make a new year's resolution to be screened for colorectal cancer

We have come upon the time of year when we reflect back on the events of 2012 and look forward to new beginnings in 2013. About 45% of Americans make New Year’s resolutions every year and frequently these resolutions are health-related.

Why not let 2013 be the year you resolve to be updated on colorectal cancer screening?

Why should I worry about colorectal cancer?

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. The average lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is about 5%. In the colon, cancer usually arises over time from abnormal polyps, called adenomas. This provides us the rare and life-saving opportunity to intervene and remove polyps to prevent cancer from developing. Pre-cancerous polyps or early cancers do not always cause symptoms, highlighting the need for routine screening.

Simply stated, there are large studies showing that screening for colorectal cancer prevents cancer. Screening saves lives. Screening detects cancer at an early and more treatable stage. How can you argue with that?

Who should be screened for colorectal cancer?

Regardless of your age, you should discuss any GI symptoms you are concerned about with your healthcare team.

If you are without symptoms...

Does it make sense to use two or more drugs in second line therapy for lung cancer?

 

 

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