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Facts and myths about colorectal cancer

March is Colorectal Awareness Month and I would like to invite anyone over the age of 50 who has not had their first screening colonoscopy to come in and get screened.

If Colorectal Awareness Month isn’t motivation enough to get you through our door, let me convince you by sharing a few facts and by debunking some of the myths surrounding colorectal cancer, colonoscopy, and the preparation:

  • Fact: In 2013, American Cancer Society reports that colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer-related cause of death in the United States.
  • Fact: Approximately 150,000 Americans will be diagnosed this year. 55,000 will
    die from colorectal cancer.
  • Myth: Colorectal Cancer is more common in men.
    (Fact: Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in as many women as men.)
  • Myth: No signs or symptoms mean I do not need to be screened.
    (Fact: Even if you are asymptomatic you should get screened. When a colorectal cancer is found and treated in its early stages, the 5 year survival rate is approximately 90%.)

Colonoscopy is still recognized as the best, and most accurate test used to diagnose colorectal cancer...

Non-invasive advances for treating early stage non small cell lung cancer

Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy is a new term that has been coined to describe the delivery of very high doses of radiation delivered over a handful of treatment sessions. This precise method targets small tumors located in the lung. This new treatment has been pioneered and studied extensively in patients who are not suitable candidates for an operation but have been diagnosed with early stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

The advantages of this approach are that the treatment can be completed in 1-2 weeks (including the planning time), and only requires 3-5 treatments. The treatment requires highly specialized planning and preparation and is delivered using state of the art linear accelerators like the CyberKnife®. Our team has been offering stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for over 4 years.

The results are outstanding for this population of patients. A number of studies have demonstrated that the local tumor control rates exceed ...

New Cancer Center to Open April 1 at Swedish/Edmonds; Outpatient Facility to Provide Medical Oncology, Infusion Services Close to Home


 
 


  
Cancer-Center-Opening-2.jpg

Swedish Cancer Institute at Edmonds opens to the public at an April 17 ribbon-cutting ceremony on the Swedish/Edmonds campus. (Left to right) David Loud, aide from Congressman Jim McDermott, M.D.; Swedish Cancer Institute Medical Oncologist Richard McGee, M.D.; Swedish/Edmonds Chief Executive Dave Jaffe; and Swedish Cancer Institute Executive Director Thomas D. Brown, M.D., MBA, cut the ribbon during the event that attracted 250 visitors. The two-story facility, located at 21632 Highway 99 in Edmonds, provides high-quality and comprehensive medical oncology to patients through an infusion unit, laboratory, pharmacy, and access to Swedish’s electronic medical record system.
 
EDMONDS, WASH.
, March 21, 2013 – Swedish Health Services will open a new outpatient cancer center at the Edmonds campus on Monday, April 1, 2013 in response to the growing need for medical oncology and infusion (chemotherapy) services in the south Snohomish and north King County area. The new two-story, 17,102-square-foot facility is anticipated to handle as many as 175 patient visits each day and provide increased access to cancer-care services for people living north of Seattle.

Colorectal Cancer Prevention

In March, we commemorate National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

To do so, we take the time to recognize the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. We honor loved ones who have been affected by colorectal cancer and raise awareness about colorectal cancer with the hopes to decrease the number of people dying from this disease.

What causes colorectal cancer?

There are a variety of genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the development of colon polyps. Only a small fraction of adenomatous colon polyps develop into colorectal cancer, but nearly all colorectal cancers arise from an adenomatous polyp. The role of colonoscopy is to identify and eradicate any adenomatous polyps so as to minimize future risk of colorectal cancer.

Several studies show that obesity increases your risk of developing colorectal cancer by 1.5 times. Cigarette smoking and moderate-to-heavy alcohol use also increase colorectal cancer risk. There is good news for Seattleites, however. Regular coffee consumption seems to decrease the risk of colorectal cancer.

How can I prevent colorectal cancer?

We have talked before about why you should be thinking about colorectal cancer screening. Simply put, it saves lives!

Besides...

Tips and resources for Colon Cancer Awareness Month

You may have heard that March is National Colorectal (or Colon) Cancer Awareness Month, and wonder what that means. You can find out more about colorectal cancer here, or from some of the resources below:

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Also, we hope you will come walk or run at the Mercer Island Half and support Colon Cancer Research!

The Swedish Cancer Institute is the title sponsor of the Mercer Island Half on Sunday, March 24. The event offers a Half Marathon Run/Walk, a 10K Run, a 5K Run/Walk and a Kids’ Dash. There is ....

Some challenges in Targeted Therapy

What makes a target? Our understanding of disease is a model, an imagined defect in a fanciful machine. The workings of the intact organism are understood on the basis of the tools at hand and conform to the models of other world events and inventions. In the 19th century, the microscope became a useful tool and the cell was the agent of health and disease. DNA, the agents of heredity, became the basis of the most advanced therapy in the late 20th century. DNA was the target for chemotherapy, as soon as its importance in heredity was realized .

DNA as a target has fallen out of fashion. Now, we imagine the cell as a network of messages, an internet, with signals, noise and switches. These are the modern targets: growth factor receptors (and their mutations), kinases (and their mutations); the cellular equivalents of antennae and amplifiers.

This is the model that is generating today’s medicines (often ...

My practice philosophy

1. Benefit the patient, that is the most important thing
     a. That means optimizing the outcome
           i. preserving the highest quality of life
           ii. For as long as possible
           iii. Optimizing the quality of life when prolongation is no longer possible
           iv. Sometimes it means a good death.
2. There is no excuse for not using the most current information
     a. RSS feed
     b. Look it up for every patient, no matter how familiar it feels
3. Honesty
     a. With the patient
          i. Phrasing is important
              1. we all need hope
     b. With the family
     c. With myself
          i. Am I doing my best at all times?
4. The patient is not a vessel of the disease.
      a. Sometimes shrinking a cancer is not a good investment for the patient.
             i. The treatment can lower quality of life
             ii. Sometimes, the treatment can shorten life.
     b. Research can emphasize the impact on the disease to the exclusion of impact on the patient
5. It is at least as important to know what doesn’t work as what does.
     a. Sparing the patient side effects is sometimes the best thing the doctor can do.
6. All assumptions should be questioned.
     a. More intensive, ineffective treatment is not good care
     b. The most dramatic therapy has the same burden of proof as any other therapy
     c. Sometimes a clinical trial is the most appropriate path
           i. But evaluate all of the alternatives

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