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'breast cancer' posts

Some challenges in Targeted Therapy

What makes a target? Our understanding of disease is a model, an imagined defect in a fanciful machine. The workings of the intact organism are understood on the basis of the tools at hand and conform to the models of other world events and inventions. In the 19th century, the microscope became a useful tool and the cell was the agent of health and disease. DNA, the agents of heredity, became the basis of the most advanced therapy in the late 20th century. DNA was the target for chemotherapy, as soon as its importance in heredity was realized .

DNA as a target has fallen out of fashion. Now, we imagine the cell as a network of messages, an internet, with signals, noise and switches. These are the modern targets: growth factor receptors (and their mutations), kinases (and their mutations); the cellular equivalents of antennae and amplifiers.

This is the model that is generating today’s medicines (often ...

C4YW Annual Conference For Young Women Affected By Breast Cancer

For the past twelve years, Living Beyond Breast Cancer (LBBC) and Young Survival Coalition (YSC) have been hosting the Annual Conference for Young Women Affected by Breast Cancer, mainly known as C4YW. This year the conference will be held at the Hyatt Regency in Bellevue, Washington, on Seattle’s Eastside! This international conference is dedicated to the issues of young women affected by breast cancer, their family, friends and caregivers.

The Swedish Cancer Institute will have a table at the C4YW event and will have a group of experts to help answer any questions you may have, including:

  • Melissa Kwaterski, Physical Therapist at Swedish Outpatient Physical Therapy will be available to answer questions about rehabilitation and more on Friday, February 22 from 4:30 – 6 p.m.

  • Kathleen Pratt, N.D. from Northwest Natural Health will be answering questions about nutrition, weight loss and weight gain, hormonal changes, and more on Saturday, February 23 from 12 – 2 p.m.
  • Lori Marshall, M.D., from Pacific Northwest Fertility will be answering questions about fertility and infertility including, In-Vitro fertilization, ovulation induction, egg freezing and preservation, and the egg donation program, and more on Saturday, February 23 from 12 – 2 p.m.

Come join us to learn more about resources and services available at the Swedish Cancer Institute, including:

Also, don’t miss out on several opportunities for a chance to go home with a free give-a-way item, like the ‘Imagine’ glassybaby! There will be three ‘Imagine’ glassybaby’s being raffled off, and each of them have proceeds that are dedicated to the Cancer Patient Assistance Fund at the Swedish Cancer Institute. Check out the beautiful color below:

Patient Education Classes at Swedish Cancer Institute

I know how overwhelming it can be when someone is diagnosed with cancer. A wealth of information is presented to you and a lot of it can be hard to remember. Yes, resource packets are wonderful tools and information sheets are extremely useful but sometimes sifting through all of the documents can be cumbersome, especially when you have specific questions. For this reason, the Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI) wants to ensure that you have access to education and information in a way that works for you.

SCI offers education programs to assist you, your family members and your caregivers in making treatment decisions, managing your symptoms, and accessing programs to help your mind, body and spirit to heal.

One of the programs is patient education classes. These classes offer practical tips that you and your family members can take home with you. The classes are intended to complement your treatment here at Swedish but also provide an opportunity where you can ask questions in a safe and secure environment.

Whether you are interested in exploring how the healing powers of art-making can help during your experience with cancer treatment or learning how naturopathic medicine complements conventional cancer treatments (or maybe you want to gain skills and confidence in creating hair alternatives) – whatever the area of focus is, we have classes that fit your needs:

Deciding on surgical treatment for breast cancer

A recent article in the Seattle Times references the 2012 Dartmouth Atlas Report: Improving Patient Decision-Making in Health Care. Unfortunately their take home line, "A new report that found wide geographical variation in the use of elective surgical procedures in Pacific states reflects the preferences of physicians – not what patients want or need, the authors say,” oversimplifies a complicated situation.

On my reading of the report, it stresses the values that an individual woman brings to the decision:

“Different women will prefer one option or the other, depending upon how much they value preserving their breast, their willingness to undergo radiation or more invasive surgery, and the level of uncertainty they are willing to live with in terms of their cancer recurring.”

As a breast surgeon who has practiced in Seattle for almost 40 years, I don’t believe that “the preferences of physicians” are the driving factor. I have a few observations to make.

It is clear that wide variations in treatment of early stage breast cancer can be seen across the USA, as the Dartmouth-Atlas data confirms. Some factors that influence this are physician related – for example, what % of their surgical practice involves treating women with breast cancer. Specialists in breast cancer or general surgeons who treat large numbers of women with breast cancer are motivated to be current in their practice patterns and to make sure that their patients are making considered decisions. The utilization of breast MRI has been shown to influence the mastectomy rates and there is regional variation in the use of that study. Distance to a radiation oncology treatment center is a factor for some women as are potential differences in out of pocket costs between mastectomy and breast conservation.

All of the local breast surgeons that I know strongly value shared decision making with their patients. We all work hard to present treatment options fairly and as neutrally as possible. If we have a patient that we think is choosing mastectomy over breast conservation out of fear – for example, fear of radiation therapy – we will encourage her to consult with a radiation oncology specialist prior to making a final decision. We believe that one of our roles is to help our patients make informed decisions. If there are clear medical reasons why one treatment is preferred, we will state that but otherwise encourage the patient to make the best decision for herself.

For example...

Two key questions to answer in a suspected cancer workup

There are two questions to be answered if cancer is suspected:

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The Story Behind the Voice of 1-855-XCANCER (1-855-922-6237)

Being diagnosed with cancer is the beginning of a difficult time. The entire process – from diagnosis to treatment to survivorship – can be exhausting. And, I am sure that when you have questions that come up, you would like to have them answered, respectfully and responsively.

As health professionals we want to ensure that you, your family, friends and caregivers have access to all resources available at the Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI). For this reason, Swedish launched a customized phone line tailored to the Cancer Institute where callers can find out more information on services available.

Whether you want to know more about different treatment options, learn more about research studies or locate community cancer resources, I am here to assist you. If you are a new patient and would like to be seen by a provider at the Swedish Cancer Institute, I can help get the process started for you by connecting you with the most appropriate SCI specialist.

To put a story behind the voice over the phone, I would like to officially introduce myself to the Swedish community! I am Swedish’s Integrated Care Services Coordinator and Telephone Liaison for the Swedish Cancer Institute and True Family Women’s Cancer Center – which means I get to work with the entire network of Swedish campuses (including First Hill, Cherry Hill, Issaquah, Ballard and Edmonds) and can help you get connected to the appropriate areas of service that you may need.

I can help to answer any questions you may have, or connect you to the following:

Do Docs Miss Breast Cancer Warning Signs in Breastfeeding Mothers?

In the haze of joy and sleeplessness during the months after childbirth, thoughts about breast cancer are the last thing on a new mother’s mind. Her body is undergoing so many changes that, of course, she and her doctors would naturally assume any breast changes are related to breastfeeding.

Probably, they are. However, there is a small but real incidence of women who develop breast cancer during and following pregnancy. Often, they end up having delays in seeking evaluation and getting a diagnosis, because they or their doctors may not appreciate that risk!

So, what things should prompt an evaluation?

  • Lumps most often will be changes in the breast tissue as it revs up milk production. A distinct lump or “dominant mass” could be a clogged duct, galactocele, cyst or a common benign tumor called a fibroadenoma, but if it doesn’t resolve within a few weeks with treatment, it needs imaging.
  • Redness most often will represent infections like mastitis or an abscess, but if it doesn’t resolve within a few weeks with treatment, it will also need imaging and possibly a biopsy. At the very least, that could determine if the right antibiotics are being used. An uncommon form of breast cancer called inflammatory breast cancer can present this way.
  • Bloody milk or baby refusing one breast  most often will be due to nipple trauma, latch issues, or positioning; if so, seeing a board-certified lactation consultant is appropriate. But rarely, this can represent a form of breast cancer within the milk ducts.
  • “Something’s not right”. You are the most knowledgeable person about your own breasts. Even if it doesn’t neatly fit one of the categories above, if something really seems wrong to you, your doctors should take that seriously.

What evaluation should be done?


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