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Vegetarian Quinoa Chili

Ingredients
  • 1 (15 ounce) can kidney beans, rinsed, drained
  • 1 (15 ounce) can black beans , rinsed , drained
  • 2 cups vegetable broth or water
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne
  • ¾ cup quinoa, rinsed thoroughly in warm water, drained
  • 1 cup frozen or fresh corn
  • 2 (15 ounce) cans diced tomatoes in juice
Directions
  1. In a large pot, heat ...
 

Fresh Tomato Basil Soup

Ingredients
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, chopped
  • 1 1/2 pounds Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced
  • 32 ounces vegetable broth
  • 12 ounces crushed tomatoes (preferably Italian)
  • 3 to 5 fresh basil leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red chilies
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon each ground black pepper and sea salt
  • Shaved Romano or Parmesan cheese for garnish
Can be served as a warm dip with crostini or grilled vegetables!

Directions
 
  1. Saute onion ...

Panzanella Bruschetta



Ingredients:
  • 1/2 16-ounce loaf baguette-style French bread
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cup shredded baby greens
  • 8 small red and/or yellow cherry or pear tomatoes, quartered; or 1/2 cup chopped, seeded tomato
  • 1/4 cup finely shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup chopped, seeded cucumber
  • 2 tablespoon finely chopped red onion
  • 2 tablespoon thinly sliced fresh basil
  • 2 teaspoon capers, rinsed and drained
  • 1 small clove garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
Directions

  1. For toasts, cut ...

9 tips for avoiding holiday weight gain

Amongst the cheer and merriment, parties and soirées, often come unwanted extra pounds that sneak their way around our waistlines. The span between Thanksgiving and New Years are filled with traditions and an extra average weight gain of 1-2 pounds. It may not sound like much, but consider over the course of a decade that can lead to an extra 10-20 pounds.  That extra luggage then leads to another tradition - the New Year’s resolution to lose weight!

Stop the insanity and start eating smart. Simple lifestyle changes will put an end to the cycle of overindulging, weight gain, and feeling miserable once the season is over. It is said the best offense is a good defense. By practicing these time-honored tips, you’ll likely feel fulfillment without getting overfilled.

1. Plan ahead.

If you know the party you are headed to will lack healthy options (hello, cookie exchange!) have a low-calorie, high protein snack prior to attending a party. This will keep your appetite in check and you will be less likely to arrive ravenous and overeat.  Hummus with vegetables, whole grain crackers and low-fat cheese, a piece of fruit with natural peanut butter, or Greek Yogurt with high fiber cereal are a few great choices to tide you over. Pair foods that are high in protein and rich in fiber to keep you satiated longer. At the party, keep to light appetizers.

2. Host a healthy holiday.

Control the nutritional content of the meal by throwing the party yourself. Plan the dinner menu with lean meats and seafood, fresh vegetables, fruits, whole-grains, beans, and low-fat dairy. Use the opportunity to try healthy recipes from sites such as www.cooklinglight.com and www.eatingright.com (Ed. Note – check out our healthy recipe collection here or on Pinterest.) In lieu of a potluck, have party guests bring non-perishable foods to donate to the food bank.

3. Lighten up your menu.

Revamp your recipes by ...

Fall in love with pumpkin

The season’s clock has turned to autumn. The air is crisp, vibrant shades of red and orange color the trees, cozy sweaters appear from the back of the closet and pumpkin everything seems to have hit the store shelves.

From pumpkin spice lattes to pumpkin spice donuts, even pumpkin pie spice Pringles potato chips! It seems as though we have forgotten the important, all-star vegetable amongst this madness: pumpkin itself!

Pumpkin is a versatile vegetable brimming with nutrition that can be used in many different forms. Pumpkin provides a wide range of health benefits including helping keeping your vision sharp and waistline slim. Here are some of the health benefits of pumpkin:

  • Vitamin A to perk your peepers: Chock full of the antioxidant beta-carotene, the dark orange hue provides greater than 200% of the RDA for Vitamin A in a 1-cup serving. Eating foods high in Vitamin A helps protect your sight, especially night vision.
  • Cut cancer risk: Speaking of those important antioxidants, beta-carotene can help prevent certain cancers, particularly skin cancer. The deep orange carotenoids are also found in carrots, butternut squash, and sweet potatoes.
  • Fiber for weight control: Eating foods high in fiber can keep you full on fewer calories thereby eating less. With 3 grams of fiber and just 49 calories in a 1-cup serving, eating more pumpkin is a great way to assist in your weight loss efforts (not recommended in pie form, unfortunately).
  • Vitamin C to  ...

(Click 'read more' for an original recipe!)

Is the FODMAP diet right for you?

FODMAPs is an acronym, coined by two Australian researchers, that refers to Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols.  These are small chain sugars, fibers, and sugar alcohols that are poorly digested by humans, but are easily digested by the bacteria in your intestine and colon.  When the bacteria consume FODMAPs, they produce gas, which leads to symptoms of gas, bloating, abdominal discomfort, and changes in bowel movements.  The FODMAP diet is used to alleviate the impact these types of foods have on your gastrointestinal tract. 

A diet low in FODMAPs food was designed to help minimize symptoms in individuals that suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional bloating.  You should discuss your symptoms with your physician prior to starting this diet since other gastrointestinal related disorders need to be excluded first (i.e., celiac disease, thyroid disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and others). 

If a diet low in FODMAP is recommended for you ...

Why dietary fiber reduces the risk of disease

Over the last couple of years, there has become more awareness surrounding the importance of dietary fiber and the prevention of disease. 

Why should I eat more fiber?

Dietary fiber can reduce the risk of certain diseases such as colon cancer, diverticular disease, and can also help lower cholesterol and improve symptoms from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).  Additionally, fiber can also be beneficial in helping to manage common bowel problems.

If you have been experiencing bowel or hemorrhoidal problems, fiber along with other dietary modifications can often help improve conditions such as constipation, diarrhea, incontinence, hemorrhoids or anal fissures.

How much fiber should I eat?

Current dietary guidelines suggest that....

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