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Eating for Two? Nutrition in Pregnancy

You may have many questions when you find out that you are pregnant, but some of the most common concerns revolve around nutrition and food safety. These are some basic guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to get you started. As always, your situation may be different and so always discuss specifics with your provider.

How much weight should I gain?

This depends on your pre-pregnancy BMI (body mass index - a calculation from your height and weight). In general, however, if your pre-pregnancy weight is normal you should gain between 25 to 35 pounds. Most women stay within this goal with an increase of only 300 extra calories a day (equal to about 2 tablespoons of peanut butter and one slice of whole wheat bread). If you are underweight, however, you may need to gain more weight, and if you are overweight, less. Your doctor can help you to come up with a specific weight goal.

What foods can't I eat?

Alcohol, of course, is not recommended in pregnancy, but there are other restrictions. Other foods can put you at risk for listeriosis, a bacterial infection that causes miscarriage and stillbirth. Unpasteurized milk and cheese can put you at risk, as can raw or undercooked shellfish, meat, or poultry. Deli meats and hotdogs are okay if they are heated until they are steaming hot.

What about fish?

That depends on the fish! Certain large fish may contain too much mercury to be safely eaten in pregnancy. High levels of mercury exposure in pregnancy may lead to nervous system damage in the unborn child. If you are pregnant you should avoid eating Shark, Tilefish, Swordfish, and King Mackerel and limit your intake of albacore tuna to 6 ounces a week.

You may eat fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury, but no more than 12 ounces a week. If you want to eat fish caught by family or friends from local waterways check for local advisories first, and do not eat more than 6 ounces.

Do I need to take extra vitamins or supplements?

It is important to take ...

Swedish to Host OB Speed Dating Session at Edmonds Campus June 7

 

EDMONDS, WASH., May 25, 2012 -- If you’re pregnant or thinking about having a baby, finding the right doctor is a pretty good place to start this incredible journey. When you come to OB Speed Dating, you’ll get the chance to meet six different doctors who deliver at Swedish Edmonds and get to know them in a fun, low-key environment.

Rate of Babies Born Electively Before 39 Weeks Falls Dramatically Statewide, Including at Swedish

SEATTLE, May 9, 2012 - Washington state hospitals, physicians and expectant mothers have teamed up to deliver a dramatic increase in the number of babies born at full term – 39 weeks – instead of earlier in their pregnancies. They did this by rapidly changing established obstetric practices in place for many years. This change came about because of new research demonstrating the short- and long-term hazards of delivery prior to 39 weeks.

Expecting the Best in Pregnancy and Multiple Sclerosis

Considering that multiple sclerosis (MS) affects primarily women of childbearing age, it comes as no surprise that for many patients MS and pregnancy often occur together. The issues to consider when discussing pregnancy and MS include:

  • How pregnancy affects MS
  • How MS affects pregnancy
  • How MS treatment should be managed throughout pregnancy

The Pregnancy in MS (PRIMS) study of 254 patients revealed that pregnancy is generally protective against MS relapses, in particular during the third trimester. In contrast, the same study found a rebound of relapses during three months post delivery, with 30 percent of women experiencing a relapse within three months after delivery. Several strategies have been proposed to avert the risk of postpartum relapse, including the use of prophylactic IVIG or corticosteroids. More recently, exclusive breast-feeding has been found to offer some protection against postpartum MS activity; however, this finding was disputed in a subsequent study.

There is no evidence ...

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