Tags
Blog

'sports' posts

Sports Concussion Clinic and Community Education

This past Wednesday, July 31, Dr. Renee Low and I provided a class on sports concussion education to Issaquah youth athletes, their parents, soccer club coaches and trainers.  We hosted about 47 attendees and discussed signs and symptoms of a concussion, risk factors and prevention, when to seek medical attention, and baseline testing. (Click here for a PDF that explains concussions and some of the symptoms.)

We also discussed Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) now being offered at Swedish.  Swedish Spine, Sports, and Musculoskeletal Medicine is now offering a sports concussion clinic for youth and adult athletes.  We provide assessment of concussion severity, physical evaluation, ongoing monitoring, neuropsychological evaluation, education, return to play, and academic support.

4 tips to prevent injuries in sports

How do you prevent sports related injuries? Here are four tips:

Getting ready for Rhody Run

On Sunday April 7, several Swedish physicians participated in Jefferson Healthcare's Runner's Symposium in Port Townsend for the upcoming Rhody Run. Over 300 runners attended the event. Dr. Erik Brand gave a lecture on core strength in runners, Dr. Jeff Moo gave a lecture on the physiological benefits of running and aerobic exercise, and lastly I gave a lecture on sports nutrition for marathon runners. We also provided musculoskeletal ultrasound screenings for over 60 participants with our two portable ultrasound machines.

Why you should take sports concussions seriously

Concussions are serious injuries that should be treated by healthcare providers who are experienced with their management. Sports Medicine physicians diagnose and treat concussions with the goal of promoting a healthy recovery and returning athletes to sports and kids to school. Additionally, we work with parents, athletes, coaches, and other providers to identify the signs and symptoms of a concussion and help to proactively manage the effects.

What is a concussion?

A concussion, also referred to as a mild traumatic brain injury, is an injury to the brain caused by a blow to the head or from a whiplash effect due to a hit to the body. Concussions change the way the brain works and how a person thinks, acts, and feels. Most people do not lose consciousness. Even a "ding" or "bell ringer" can be serious.

What are the symptoms of a concussion?

Symptoms fall into four categories: physical, cognitive or thinking abilities, mood and behavior, and sleep. A person may have many symptoms or only a couple of symptoms. If a person reports one or more symptoms of concussion or if another person notices the symptoms, keep the person out of play and seek medical attention.

The symptoms of a concussion that fall into each category include:

Free Class on Nutrition for Young Athletes to be Held at Swedish/Issaquah Feb. 20

ISSAQUAH, WA, Jan. 23, 2013 - With spring sports starting, don't drop the ball on nutrition. Nutrition is just as important as physical conditioning for athletes. So, as spring sports begin, let Swedish help you and your children prepare to hit it out of the park. Join Registered Dietitian Ally Colson for an interactive training on game-winning meals and snacks and help your young athlete become a nutrition champion.

Organized sports activities: safety and benefits

A lot of children are now enrolled in organized sports activities, and more and more children are starting at a younger age. Children are enticed by successful professional sports players and strive to be like them. Many parents enroll their children in organized sports activities with the hope that their child would get an athletic scholarship for college and go on to become a professional player. However, parents must realize that only a few children end up becoming successful professional players.

It is important for children to be physically active, and organized sports can be a part of this healthy lifestyle. Studies have shown that children and adolescents who are physically active do well academically in school, have greater self-esteem, sleep well and have less behavioral/emotional problems. Children and adolescents who are active every day tend to develop less health problems like hypertension, obesity and hyperlipidemia , and grow to become healthy adults.

Here are some important ideas to keep in mind when your child is enrolled in organized sports activity:

It's Snow Laughing Matter

Winter’s here and just a little more than a week away will be winter break for most of our kids. If we’re lucky enough we’ll get a chance to get out and play in the snow.

Skiing, snowboarding, sledding, or a good old-fashioned snowball fight sound like a family memory waiting to happen. Let’s make sure it’s happy memories we’re creating not a regretful ones.

Most parents these days grew up in the time where we didn’t wear helmets when riding bikes much less on the slopes, but what we know now about Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) will make you think twice about sliding off the ski lift without one on.

Results 8-14 of 14