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Healthy tips for parents and kids to help prevent the spread of colds and the flu

Summer has ended, the kids are back in school, and fall is officially here. Which means….cold and flu season is upon us! Hospitals are already seeing documented cases of seasonal influenza. There are no known cures for colds and flu, so cold and flu prevention should be your goal.

Why do we care about preventing influenza? The flu can be very dangerous for children, causing illness, hospital stays and death each year. The CDC (Center for Disease Control) reports about 20,000 children below the age of 5 are hospitalized from flu complications each year.

The most effective way for preventing the flu is to get the flu shot. It works better than anything else. (Flu vaccination is recommended for all children aged 6 months and older). There are additional strategies you can employ to help ward off those nasty viruses.

Here are 6 tips you can use to help prevent colds and the flu:

Feeding Tips for Picky Eaters

It is important that children develop healthy eating habits early in life. Here are some ways to help your child eat well and to make meal times easier.

What to Expect:

  • After the first year of life, growth slows down, and your child's appetite may change.
  • It's normal for your child to eat more on some days and very little on other days.
  • A child may refuse to eat in order to have some control in his life.
  • A child may be happy to sit at the table for 15 to 20 minutes and no longer.
  • A child may want to eat the same food over and over again.

How can I encourage my child to eat more?

  • Set regular meal and snack times. Avoid feeding your child in between these times, so that they are hungry at meal and snack times. If you want your child to eat dinner at the same time you do, try to time his snack-meals so that they are at least two hours before dinner.
  • Limit juice and milk between meals. Offer water between meals, which will satisfy thirst without spoiling the appetite. Serve drinks at the end of the meal.
  • Respect tiny tummies. Keep portion sizes small. Here's a rule of thumb – or, rather, of hand. A young child's stomach is approximately the size of his fist. A good serving size for a young child is 1/2 slice of bread, 1 oz of meat, or 1/4 cup of fruit or vegetable pieces.
  • Respect changing appetites. Offer ...

Cholesterol and stroke awareness

September is also National Cholesterol Awareness month!

Do you know your numbers? It is important to know your cholesterol levels as they influence your risk of stroke.  Talk to your provider today to find out where you stand!

Do you have trouble remembering “good” cholesterol versus “bad” cholesterol?  An easy way to keep them straight is to think HDL = happy (“good” cholesterol) and LDL = lousy (“bad” cholesterol).  Check out the American Heart Association’s Meet the Fats for memorable information about cholesterol.

How does cholesterol affect stroke risk?  Build-up of cholesterol plaque within your arteries increases your risk of stroke by blocking normal blood flow.  This reduces the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the affected area.

How can you improve your cholesterol numbers?

No-Cook Meals for Multiple Sclerosis - Week 3: Tuna and Fennel Sandwiches

It’s back-to-school time and this week’s no-cook meal for multiple sclerosis is a twist on an American childhood mainstay; the tuna fish sandwich. Instead of mayonnaise and pickles, this meal uses flavorful olive oil, tangy vinegar and fresh crunchy vegetables.

Recipe: Tuna and Fennel Sandwiches

 

Super food ingredient: Chunk light tuna

There is strong evidence that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish can lower triglycerides and blood pressure. Make sure to choose “chunk light tuna,” which is three times lower in mercury than the solid white or albacore tuna.

Also choose water-packed tuna over oil packed. Some of the omega-3 fatty acids leak into the added oil and will be lost when you drain the can. Because water...

Managing your fall allergies and symptoms

Although it’s hard to avoid everything that triggers fall allergies, there are many things that can be done to limit or treat the side effects so everyone can enjoy the season.

What allergies present in the fall?

Dirt-based molds are the main trigger of fall outdoor allergies. Mold is in decaying that plant material in yards and parks, as well as in pumpkin patches, hay and barns. Because we tend to close up our homes as the weather gets worse, inside allergens may get worse. Indoor mold, dust mites and our pets can trigger symptoms.

How do I know I have fall allergies?

Symptoms are the same as you might experience in the spring. Congestion, sneezing, post-nasal drip and itchy, watery eyes are the most common signs of fall allergies.

How can I limit allergens and reduce allergy symptoms?

Tips for kids with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Working as a CMA (certified medical assistant) in Swedish Pediatric Gastroenterology, I have the responsibility and honor of taking care of children diagnosed with a variety of gastrointestinal problems, one of the most serious being Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).  IBD is an autoimmune disease that causes chronic intestinal inflammation.  Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative Colitis are the two main types of IBD, depending on the location and depth of inflammation in the gut. 

As I work with the families of children diagnosed with IBD, I am constantly amazed at what a complicated job they have, balancing life between a chronic illness and the challenges of “normal childhood”. 

As the school year gets off to a start, seeing how hectic life can become for most kids, I wanted to write down a few ways children with IBD might better empower themselves to gain control over their chronic disease:

No-Cook Meals for Multiple Sclerosis Week 2: Gazpacho

Last week, I shared the first of a few recipes that are easy to prepare, and don’t require heating up the kitchen on a warm summer day.

Heat sensitivity can be a serious issue for people living with multiple sclerosis (MS), causing a temporary worsening, or exacerbation, of their symptoms.

This week’s no-cook meal is a tomato-based soup that is traditionally served cold. It’s chilled serving temperature makes it a popular dish for summer months and it’s veggie content makes it a nutrient-packed part of your meal.

Recipe: Gazpacho

 

Super food ingredient: Olive oil

Olive oil is ...

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