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'neuroscience' posts

Swedish MS Center design recognized

Less than two years old, the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center has already received an overwhelming amount of praise from patients and physicians alike for its holistic approach to world class care.

Now we can add one more accolade to the list.

Healthcare Design magazine recently recognized the MS Center’s patient and family waiting area as a finalist in the Family Spaces category of its Healthcare Design Remodel Renovation Competition.The entire piece beautifully encapsulates the approach, design and ultimately the quality of care that the MS Center strives to deliver. Here is an excerpt of one of the judge’s comments:

“The entire design is a phenomenal reflection of a deep understanding of the unique needs of patients with multiple sclerosis. It is apparent the design team did their research, listened to the voice of the patient and caregivers, and integrated evidence-based design principles….”

That’s high praise, and it is rewarding to know that the attention we paid to every detail — from furniture and flooring to treatment and waiting areas — was noticed. But it is even more rewarding to know that the center has become an incredible resource in treating those diagnosed with MS, a degenerative disease that strikes the central nervous system.

Debilitating Facial Pain May Be Trigeminal Neuralgia

All pain can be frightening, but when patients describe sharp, electric-type pain in their face, the cause may be Trigeminal Neuralgia, a treatable pain syndrome manifesting as unilateral facial pain that can be severe in intensity. The pain occurs in one or more distributions of the trigeminal nerve. The pain usually lasts for several seconds to several minutes followed by periods of being pain free. Trigeminal neuralgia pain can be triggered by sensory stimuli to the face including talking, brushing teeth, eating, and touching the face. In some cases, there is no trigger. The annual incidence of trigeminal neuralgia is approximately 4 in 100,000. The initial workup for trigeminal neuralgia may include an MRI of the brain to rule out brain tumor or MS plaques.

In many cases, trigeminal neuralgia is caused by compression of the facial nerve most commonly by the superior cerebellar artery or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, although trigeminal neuralgia can be due to compression by a persistent permanent trigeminal artery or odioectatic basilar artery. Other causes of Trigeminal Neuralgia can include demyelinating disease (such as multiple sclerosis) and tumor. In some cases, the cause of Trigeminal Neuralgia is  ...

January 25 essential tremor seminar

If you or someone you care about shakes a lot—it could be essential tremor (ET) or another movement disorder. Essential tremor is a disorder affecting approximately 10 million Americans. This progressive neurological condition can cause the hands, head, voice, legs or trunk of the body to shake and can cause significant disability. It is often confused with Parkinson’s disease or dystonia. Because of stereotypes and lack of awareness, many people with ET never seek medical care, though most would benefit from treatment.
 
In an upcoming event, Dr. Ryder Gwinn will explain the causes, diagnosis,  research and treatment options for essential tremor.
 
Date: Saturday, January 25
Time: Check-in 9:30am/Program 10am-Noon
Location: Bellevue Hilton, 300 112 Ave SE, Bellevue, WA
 
There is no charge for the event but please note, parking in the Bellevue Hilton lot is $5.

Registration is required - call 888-387-3667 or visit www.essentialtremor.org/seminars

 

 
 

Constraint induced movement therapy in MS may be equally effective as in stroke

Constraint induced movement therapy (CIMT), formerly called “forced use” is a treatment for impaired function of an upper extremity. It has been established as an effective evidence-based form of treatment for rehab of impaired upper extremity (UE) function for post stroke hemiparesis. The core features of CIMT are massed practice (high repetitions) and to overcome learned non-use thru behavior modification. The typical training protocol involves a 2 week period of physical restraint of the less-involved side (90% of the waking hours) and intensive training (3 hours/day) focused on movement patterns of the involved hand and arm. The physical restraint is usually a padded mitt, sling or glove thereby restricting stronger arm use.
At a recent ECTRIMS/RIMS meeting, this form of therapy was presented as being equally effective in

Research and progress for progressive Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

I am delighted to write the blog over the Progressive MS session that was given at ECTRIMS 2013.  Much emphasis has been given to the need for more research in the fields of progressive MS.  The majority of MS patients fit into this broad category: primary progressive MS, secondary progressive MS, and progressive relapsing forms of the disease.  During a session devoted to progressive MS, leaders in the field discussed several initiatives underway to address the challenges presented by these forms of the disease. 

Rehabilitation is a mainstay and key to improving the lives of patients with progressive MS. Many patients describe their progression in terms of mobility decline, which is a major target of improvement in rehabilitation programs.

The first session was devoted to confusion surrounding the definition of “progression in MS.”  We use ...

Swedish Neuroscience Institute Seeks Participants for Trial of an Investigational Technology to Treat Essential Tremor

One of only four sites in U.S. to treat neurological disorder
 

SEATTLE, Sept. 26, 2013 – Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is looking for patients willing to participate in a study of an investigational technology to treat essential tremor, a common neurological disorder, with sound rather than surgery.

An estimated 10 million people in the U.S have essential tremor (ET), which causes a rhythmic shaking or trembling of hands and arms but can also affect the head, legs and other parts of the body. It affects one out of every 25 adults over 40 and can be confused with but is different from better-known Parkinson’s disease, which is actually much less prevalent. ET produces disabilities that hamper basic daily activities and worsens over time, with severely affected patients unable to feed or care for themselves.

Dr. Ryder Gwinn, the Principle Investigator for the study at SNI who has utilized other treatments for patients with essential tremor, said focused ultrasound could be an option for many of these patients. For example, medication has been shown to be ineffective for up to half of all ET patients.

Proteomics identifies protein changes in multiple sclerosis and CIS

A recent study published in the journal PLOS ONE found differences in protein levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) among people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS).

Using the relatively new field of proteomics, researchers were able to identify each individual protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)—86 total—and compares their levels among people with relapsing MS, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and healthy individuals. People with RRMS had different levels of 20 proteins compared to people with CIS. Seventy five percent of those proteins related to neurons (rather than myelin). Changes were particularly notable for proteins related to neurons in participants with CIS.

This study is one of many MS studies coming from the relatively new field of proteomics. This field uses ...

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