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Service animals help support people with MS

On October 21, 2013 the Multiple Sclerosis Center at Swedish Neuroscience Institute hosted a meet and greet with Buddy Hayes, national speaker for Canine Companions for Independence.  Buddy, as she prefers to be called, is a military veteran and the owner of Stanford, a handsome Labrador Retriever service dog given to her by Canine Companions for Independence.

Canine Companions for Independence is the largest national nonprofit organization provider of assistance dogs in the United States.  Canine Companions proudly provides assistance dogs to people in need completely free of charge.  They use hundreds of volunteers around the country and an expert team of professionals to deliver a service that allows people to continue living active and independent lives with the help of a professionally trained dog.

Stanford has been taught to make Buddy’s life easier and safer.  For example, Stanford can help open doors, turn lights on/off, pick up dropped items, and pull her lightweight wheelchair if needed.  One of the very practical lessons a dog is taught is to go to the bathroom on verbal command.  To obtain a service dog, one must ...

Therapy and rehab for stroke survivors

Stroke survivors often encounter physical, cognitive or emotional challenges after their stroke. Rehab helps stroke survivors relearn skills that are lost when part of the brain is damaged.  Participating in physical or occupational therapy can be extremely beneficial in assisting patients and their families in the recovery process.

Physical therapists commonly examine, evaluate, and treat stroke patients, facilitating progress towards restoring function, reducing pain, and preventing further injuries or complications.  This therapy is a form of exercise treatment to help with mobility, strength and general function based upon the individual’s needs.

Occupational therapists focus on occupations or activities are meaningful to the individual. They develop individualized care plans that may include adaptations for how to perform tasks, changes to the survivor’s surroundings, or helping individuals to alter their own behaviors.  These plans are designed to ...

Cancer control and survivorship

I recently attended the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) meeting, a consortium of research institutions doing clinical trials on cancer. The conference highlighted how new research will remarkably affect cancer survivorship, quality of life (QOL), integrative care and our ability to predict and provide needed services more accurately and with greater cost effectiveness for cancer survivors. The tools for implementing cancer control are evolving quickly.

Here are some highlights from the meeting:

  • Biomarkers, which are any human characteristics that are measurable including everything from gene expression (or over-expression) to pain surveys, can potentially predict long term survival as well as the specific services that will most benefit patients.
  • Symptoms that are increasingly predictable by biomarker assays include fatigue, insomnia, pain, anorexia, nausea, depression and others. This means that we will soon be able to better predict the patients who will be affected by these problems and deliver interventions much earlier and more effectively.
  • Patient satisfaction is frequently not related to treatment outcome. Factors such as QOL and survivorship are important.
  • Lung cancer patients suffer inordinately high, long-term QOL deficits. Many of these respond well to interventions but interventions are frequently not provided to patients with lung cancer.
  • Symptom clusters ...

Brain Aneurysm Awareness: Spreading the Word

September is National Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month and across the country, those affected by various forms of the disease raise awareness through fundraising and visibility events. Bringing a voice to the disease may seem daunting in a sea of awareness ribbons and weekend community walks—but  Swedish had the opportunity to focus a spotlight on Seattle as host for the Brain Aneurysm Foundation’s Annual Symposium. This Massachusetts-based organization is the nation’s only not-for-profit profit organization solely dedicated to providing critical awareness, education, support and research funding to reduce the incidence of brain aneurysms. Swedish Neuroscience Institute physicians teamed up with other elite physicians from across the country and others in the medical community, in addition to volunteers and Brain Aneurysm Foundation members to learn more about advances in research for the disease.

One unique component to this important event was the attendance of members of the Swedish Cerebrovascular Support Group. The group, established in 2012, brings together patients, family members and caregivers to share their experiences, with the goal of alleviating fears and concerns through education and group discussions...

Atrial fibrillation (afib) awareness

September is National Atrial Fibrillation Awareness month! 

Atrial fibrillation (afib) is an abnormal heart rhythm that may lead to increased risk of stroke or other heart-related problems.  

Common signs and symptoms of afib include:

  • Rapid and irregular heartbeat
  • Fluttering or “thumping” in the chest
  • Faintness, dizziness or weakness
  • Shortness of breath and anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Chest pain

For individuals with atrial fibrillation or flutter, it is important to maintain a healthy lifestyle.  This includes following ....

Oncology social workers help patients with cancer

“What happens if my insurance won’t pay for all of this treatment?”
“How do I tell my young daughter about my cancer?”
“My spouse is really struggling, but I don’t know how to help him.” 
“How will I get to radiation every day if I can’t drive?”
“My friends and family call a lot, but I don’t feel like talking to them”
“I’m scared.”   “I’m angry”   “I’m sad”    “I’m confused”
“What’s a power of attorney…and do I need one?”
“Where can I find out about a support group? ”
“I wish I knew where to turn.”

If you are faced with a diagnosis of cancer, you may be asking similar questions and wondering where to turn for answers.  A good place to start is with an oncology social worker.  Oncology social workers assist with the non-medical issues that often arise when someone is diagnosed with cancer.  We have master’s degrees in social work, and are specially trained to provide counseling and assistance with services that can reduce stress for you and your family through all phases of your cancer diagnosis and treatment.  Social work services are available at the Swedish Cancer Institute at our First Hill, Edmonds, and Issaquah campuses, and are provided at no cost to our patients. 

We can help you:

Active Women, Healthy Women - A Partnership Between Swedish Cancer Institute and Team Survivor Northwest

We are happy to announce that Swedish Cancer Institute and Team Survivor Northwest have recently partnered to offer an ongoing fitness program for women cancer survivors at the Swedish Cancer Institute. Certified fitness instructors will assist you in assessing your health and fitness levels to help you reap the benefits of exercise. The focus of Active Women, Healthy Women is on stretching, strength training and cardio workouts. Come enjoy the camaraderie of other women in this safe and supportive environment.

Active Women, Healthy Women is available at the Swedish/First Hill and Swedish/Issaquah campuses and is open to patients, family members and caregivers, free of charge.

Fall 2013 Dates:

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