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What parents and teens should know about marijuana

In 2012, Washington passed legislation to legalize marijuana use for people 21 and over.  While still illegal for those under 21, it is important to understand how this might affect adolescents and children.

Facts about marijuana and teens:

  • In a 2009 national study, 32.8% of 12th graders had used marijuana in the last year, and 20.6% within the last month.
  • One in eight adolescents who start using marijuana by age 14 become dependent.
  • When prolonged marijuana use starts in the teen years it is linked to a significant drop in IQ points - and the decrease is irreparable.
  • Marijuana can affect memory and concentration, cause or exacerbate depression/anxiety/hallucinations, and negatively affect asthma and other chronic lung diseases.
  • Marijuana is much more potent now than in the past.  In 2012 the average concentration of THC in marijuana was 15% (compared to just 4% in the 1980s).
  • Harmful effects occur whether marijuana is smoked, ingested, or vaporized.  “Edibles” are becoming more popular, and present unique risks.  It may take longer to feel the effects when ingested rather than smoked - this often leads to users consuming more than intended and experiencing severe side effects.
  • Adults cannot “share” with teens - it is felony to provide marijuana to a minor.

What you can do as a parent:

  • Start the conversation early - begin talking to your child about marijuana and other substances by about age 10.
  • Set clear expectations that marijuana is like any other drug, and is illegal for anyone under 21.  For example ...

Free Class on Nutrition for Young Athletes to be Held at Swedish/Issaquah Feb. 20

ISSAQUAH, WA, Jan. 23, 2013 - With spring sports starting, don't drop the ball on nutrition. Nutrition is just as important as physical conditioning for athletes. So, as spring sports begin, let Swedish help you and your children prepare to hit it out of the park. Join Registered Dietitian Ally Colson for an interactive training on game-winning meals and snacks and help your young athlete become a nutrition champion.

How's the View

When pilots train they learn from a book, and then simulators, then by riding in the co-pilot’s seat. It’s a progression of information that’s built upon the comprehension of the previous set of knowledge learned.

Driving a car is no different. It is not recommended, and by Washington State Law not allowed, that children ride in the front seat until the age of 13 years old. This has to do with the bone structure and how it develops after we go through puberty; how the seatbelt holds onto said bone structure and the fact that in the front seat, in a front-end collision, the engine block is being shoved into the passenger compartment. This is a very safe, reasonable recommendations for keeping kids safe in a car.

If a child starts riding in the front seat at the age of 13 years, they will have 2 to 3 years worth of observation before they start driving the vehicles themselves...unless they’re looking at screens.
Years ago, we started putting DVD players and game systems into vehicles to keep kids happy and occupied. Smartphones, iPods, iPads, and all other handheld entertainment systems have followed those kids up to the front seat, once they were old enough to sit there.

The problem lies with the fact that they’re not learning from observation. The parents are probably not having conversations about ...

Personal Listening Devices: Hip or Harmful?

If your child is one of the 304 million people who currently utilize an iPod, they could potentially be damaging their hearing. Research in recent years has demonstrated the startling trend that noise-induced hearing loss is on the rise, especially among children and teens.

Today, one in eight children aged 6-19 years has some degree of noise-induced hearing loss, which is twice the rate as seen in 1971. But noise isn’t a new phenomenon for kids. Historically, children have worked on farms, cut down trees, or fired guns without hearing protection. However, personal listening devices, like the iPod, are one of the most significant changes in our culture in the past 15-20 years, and they are here to stay.

Walk around the local park, ballfield, or school, and you will see numerous children and adults connected to earbuds. The extremely popular iPod has the capacity to produce an output of as much as 115 decibels at maximum volume, which is about as loud as a jet airplane taking off. At that level, it takes less than a few minutes to cause permanent damage. Of course, not everybody listens to his or her personal device at that volume. But in many instances the volume is turned up to combat background noise, and those earbuds placed directly into the ear can boost the volume as much as 6 to 9 decibels.

The damage that noise exposure causes is cumulative, permanent, and totally preventable. So what can we do?

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