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'nutrition' posts

New healthy weight class series in January

In this 3 series class you will learn the tools to eat well and maintain a healthy weight.  Whether you want to lose weight or learn how to maintain your weight, or your family’s weight, this series is for you!

In this class, you will gain:

  • Tools for everyday life including: Shopping lists and recipes, how to read a food label, proper portion control, and mindful eating techniques

  • An understanding of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, and minerals

  • An understanding of your own relationship with food

Fee: $68  for the 3 class series (includes you and one guest)

7 benefits of eating together as a family

Regular family meals are good for children and for the family as a whole! Here's why:

1. Eating together encourages family togetherness
  • Positive family mealtimes help family members maintain relationships and feel a sense of belonging
  • When children can count on regular time with a parent or adults, they feel loved, safe and secure
  • Children set roots for a lifetime as they experience their family’s values and traditions

2. Eating together fosters happy, well-adjusted kids
  • Kids can feel accepted by their family and may not need to seek approval from the wrong crowd
  • Adolescents are less likely to be depressed and generally have a better self- esteem
  • Adolescents are less likely to smoke cigarettes, use marijuana, illegal drugs or alcohol

3. Eating together helps kids do better in school
  • Listening to grownups at the table exposes children to new works which helps them read better
  • Table talk gives youth a safe place to express their ideas. They ....

Eat well and maintain a healthy weight - new class series

Most of us have heard the term, “the obesity epidemic,” and we are affected by it each day. Some of us have had personal weight struggles or have watched a loved one struggle, and all of us have been affected by the food industry’s constant flood of conflicting nutrition and diet information.
 
This has left us:
  • Frustrated and confused with our bodies
  • Unclear about how to feed ourselves
  • Constantly dieting or giving up on losing weight entirely
  • Overweight, obese, and sick
  • Eating for emotional reasons rather than eating to fuel our bodies
  • Misunderstanding obesity
If we want to be healthy, we must understand the basic science behind nutrition, obesity, and metabolism, and we must connect with our own personal needs. With the proper education, we can navigate through the media’s information, stop dieting, find our healthy weight, and change our lifestyle habits in a sustainable way.

Swedish Community Education and Swedish Weight Loss Services have partnered and are now offering Healthy Weight Classes; a three-class series that teaches you the tools you need to eat well and maintain a healthy weight. The classes provide ...

How to prevent food poisoning

Many of us are aware of the recent nationwide recall of peaches and other fruit due to the potential of bacterial contamination.  Although thankfully, no illnesses have been reported so far, I’d like to take this opportunity to refresh our knowledge about ways to avoid food borne illness or food poisoning.

 
According to The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), food poisoning affects approximately 1 in 6 Americans every year. Often it results in relatively mild symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea and vomiting that resolve within a day or so. However, food poisoning can also lead to more dangerous and even deadly outcomes, which is why food safety is so important! 
 
So how should we protect our family from food borne illness?   It’s pretty easy!  Just remember 4 basic steps:  clean, separate, cook and chill!

Gluten intolerance or low FODMAPs?

Despite test results that show no evidence of their children having neither any detectable allergies to wheat nor any signs of celiac disease, many parents choose to have their children follow a gluten-free diet.  This is because of convincing stories of how gluten (a protein found in wheat and other grains) seems to cause their kids to have belly aches, nausea, bloating and a variety of other symptoms.  

For years, this was hard to explain without a scientific explanation.   Gastroenterologists like me had a hard time supporting families who wanted to follow gluten free diets, without a good “medical reason”.  Then, in 2011, researchers from Australia conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, rechallenge trial in nearly 3 dozen patients (none of whom had celiac disease or wheat allergy), all of whom described worsening symptoms when unknowingly ingesting small amounts of gluten.  The results of this study described a condition termed, “Non-celiac gluten intolerance”.    It was after reading this landmark study that many physicians, including myself, began to validate parents’ concerns about gluten being the culprit behind their children’s gastrointestinal (GI) problems.

But then in 2013, just as word of non-celiac gluten intolerance was gaining popularity amongst physicians like me, the exact same group of researchers from Australia published a follow-up study on a similar set of about 3 dozen patients.  The findings of this 2nd study showed that instead...

Does your child have a food allergy or food sensitivity?

“Every time my child eats, his belly hurts. I think he must have a food allergy. Can you help us?”

Countless times have I heard this from parents of children worried about foods being the cause of their child’s gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. Some families wonder whether their child should start a “gluten-free” or other type of dietary change. More often than not, families have already tried a few diets before meeting with me.

Parents considering these types of elimination diets need to be aware of a few key points:
The difference between “food allergy” and “food sensitivity”:

Public Comment Period on Food Label Changes Ending Soon

Time is running out if you want your opinion to be heard when it comes to the FDA’s proposed changes to the iconic food label that we’ve all come to rely on when buying packaged foods. 

This is a big deal.  For those of you who haven’t heard, highlighted below are the key proposed changes:

  • Require information about the amount of “added sugars”.  A review of this was discussed in Dr. Thekke Karumathil’s blog a few months ago.

  • Remove the “calories from fat” label

  • Update serving size requirements

  • Present “dual-column” labels to differentiate “per-serving” and “per-package” calorie and nutrition information

  • Only require the declaration of amounts of 4 nutrients (vit D, calcium, iron, and potassium).  No longer will nutrients like Vitamin A and C be required, although manufacturers may declare them voluntarily.

  • Refresh the format to emphasize calories, serving sizes, and percent daily value.

Here's what these changes would look like:

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