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Helping kids with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): Do you know what it is?  Do you know what symptoms people suffer from? Do you know that 1.4 million Americans have IBD, and that it can affect both children and adults alike?  The gastroenterology team at Swedish takes care of both children and adults who suffer with this chronic, disease of the gastrointestinal tract

As the pediatric gastroenterology nurse who works intimately with the pediatric IBD patients at Swedish, I know all too well that many can suffer with the “ups and downs” of this sometimes debilitating disease.  Often, I tend to hear from kids when they are “down”, but my favorite time to hear from them is when they are excited about upcoming special events like the “Take Steps” walk, or Camp Oasis (a camp just for kids with IBD), both events sponsored by the CCFA.  It’s often at these events, that children first say that they start to feel “normal”. 

This year, we want to invite you to ...

How we do recycling at Swedish Ballard

Did you know that the health care industry in the United States is the second largest producer of waste sent to the landfill?
 
Swedish works to improve our efforts each year by reducing waste and increasing recycling and composting. The Ballard campus had a recycling rate of 59% in 2013, one of the highest recycling rates in the country. The industry average is 36%. This campus composted 132,480 pounds of yard and food waste, and recycled 77,300 pounds of comingled materials. We accomplish this by the combined efforts of employees, patients and guests.
 
How do we do this?

Living our legacy

I officially joined Swedish as chief executive in November 2013. One of the many things that drew me to Swedish was its powerful legacy of innovation, care quality, and its focus on serving every member of our communities, regardless of their ability to pay.
 
Today, this legacy lives on through our team of dedicated caregivers, our leadership and our community partners. We challenge ourselves to think beyond the status quo to find the best outcomes for our patients.
 
It is an incredibly exciting time here at Swedish. During a period of unprecedented changes in the health care industry, I am proud to tell you that Swedish is stronger now than ever. Just a few years ago, our institution was stabilizing following significant financial challenges. Today, we are strongly positioned to continue delivering high quality, accessible care to the communities of Western Washington.
 
One of our most effective strategies for improving the health and well-being of those we serve is our affiliation with Providence Health & Services. I continue to hear questions about how the affiliation benefits Swedish and I want to provide you with specific examples of how the affiliation has strengthened our ability to serve more people across our communities, regardless of their ability to pay.

Last year, we:

An innovative solution for the un (and under) insured

Health-care reform is a big, confusing, emotionally-charged topic. Now that 2014 is underway and the Affordable Care Act is beginning to take effect, many more Americans will have greater access to health insurance than they had before. It is estimated that 180,000 people in King County alone will become newly insured this year.

Still, there will be many people in our community – and throughout the country – who will continue to face barriers to accessing care. Some of them will be considered underinsured because they can’t afford to fill the gap in medical expenses not covered by their insurance. Others receiving Medicaid may find it difficult to locate a physician who is willing to take them on as a patient, as doctors are not required to see Medicaid patients, and many don’t. And then, there will probably always be those people who don’t have any insurance at all because, for one reason or another, they can’t sign up: the homeless, the chronically mentally ill, those who can’t read or write English, to name just a few.

Community clinics scattered throughout the nation, including several in our community, help address this problem on the primary care end. But access to specialty medical care for low-income patients facing barriers to care like the ones described above is likely to remain extremely difficult.

Fortunately, an innovative program pioneered at Swedish is addressing this effectively, and is likely to become a national model.

The Swedish Community Specialty Clinic (SCSC) was expanded and moved to the Swedish/First Hill campus in  ..

Swedish Honored at Leaders in Health Care 2014 Event

Seattle Business magazine recognizes Swedish for Outstanding Community Outreach

News Release
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                        
 
Contacts: Clay Holtzman, Swedish, 206-386-2748, clay.holtzman@swedish.org
 
Swedish Honored at Leaders in Health Care 2014 Event
Seattle Business magazine recognizes Swedish for Outstanding Community Outreach
 
SEATTLE — Feb. 25, 2014 — Swedish Health Services’ Community Benefits Program received the Outstanding Community Outreach award at Seattle Business magazine’s fifth annual Leaders in Health Care awards celebration. The largest and most comprehensive non-profit health provider in the Pacific Northwest, Swedish is known for creating high-impact community outreach programs such as the Swedish Community Specialty Clinic and Global to Local (G2L).
 
The Leaders in Health Care awards honor 25 outstanding organizations in eight categories, ranging from medical research to lifetime achievement. The Outstanding Community Outreach award recognizes organizations that are committed to developing and implementing original programs that improve the health of local communities.  
 
“It is an honor to be recognized with such a prestigious award,” said Tom Gibbon, manager of the Swedish Community Specialty Clinic and Ballard High School Teen Clinic. “It showcases years of work that not only benefits the most vulnerable populations in our community, but also offers sustainable and replicable solutions that will change how care is delivered.”
 
The Swedish Community Benefits Program evaluates public health data and collaborates with local organizations to produce initiatives that address a wide range of community health needs in the Pacific Northwest. Since 2006, Swedish has launched more than 15 initiatives. Programs such as the Swedish Community Specialty Clinic and Global to Local exist to combat long-term challenges while addressing immediate health care needs.  
 

Swedish MS Center design recognized

Less than two years old, the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center has already received an overwhelming amount of praise from patients and physicians alike for its holistic approach to world class care.

Now we can add one more accolade to the list.

Healthcare Design magazine recently recognized the MS Center’s patient and family waiting area as a finalist in the Family Spaces category of its Healthcare Design Remodel Renovation Competition.The entire piece beautifully encapsulates the approach, design and ultimately the quality of care that the MS Center strives to deliver. Here is an excerpt of one of the judge’s comments:

“The entire design is a phenomenal reflection of a deep understanding of the unique needs of patients with multiple sclerosis. It is apparent the design team did their research, listened to the voice of the patient and caregivers, and integrated evidence-based design principles….”

That’s high praise, and it is rewarding to know that the attention we paid to every detail — from furniture and flooring to treatment and waiting areas — was noticed. But it is even more rewarding to know that the center has become an incredible resource in treating those diagnosed with MS, a degenerative disease that strikes the central nervous system.

Team Swedish Bikes for Multiple Sclerosis

The Swedish S’myelin Babes, Swedish’s Bike MS team, raised more than $46,000 this year. The annual event raises funds for multiple sclerosis research and local programs to support people living with the disease.

Check out a few photos captured by Dr. Lily JungHenson from this year’s event:

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