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'education' posts

Swedish multiple sclerosis neurologists educate about MS with country artist Clay Walker

Neurologists from the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center spoke Tuesday evening in Seattle at an educational program featuring country music artist Clay Walker.

Drs. James Bowen and Lily JungHenson gave an update on advancements in multiple sclerosis research to about 200 patients and care partners living with multiple sclerosis (MS). Clay Walker shared his experience living with relapsing-remitting MS and how he manages his symptoms with a busy career.

Sports Concussion Clinic and Community Education

This past Wednesday, July 31, Dr. Renee Low and I provided a class on sports concussion education to Issaquah youth athletes, their parents, soccer club coaches and trainers.  We hosted about 47 attendees and discussed signs and symptoms of a concussion, risk factors and prevention, when to seek medical attention, and baseline testing. (Click here for a PDF that explains concussions and some of the symptoms.)

We also discussed Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) now being offered at Swedish.  Swedish Spine, Sports, and Musculoskeletal Medicine is now offering a sports concussion clinic for youth and adult athletes.  We provide assessment of concussion severity, physical evaluation, ongoing monitoring, neuropsychological evaluation, education, return to play, and academic support.

A New Contribution to Cardiothoracic Surgical Education

There is nothing more satisfying for a clinician than when a patient understands their ailment, comprehends the nature of the pathology involved, and is clear on the treatment/procedure they are about to undergo. This "satisfaction" is a joyous emotion reflecting successful communication -- it is what parents feel when their children first begin to read, and what educators aspire to when their students master the material at hand.

It is a privilege to share our most recent contribution to the cardiothoracic surgery community, the TSRA Primer of Cardiothoracic Surgery...

 

What you should know about Hepatitis B or C on World Hepatitis Day

Break out the champagne and streamers—it’s World Hepatitis Day! Okay, so it might not sound like much of party, but if you are one of the millions of people with viral Hepatitis there is no reason to be a wallflower.

Over 500 million people around the world are infected with either Hepatitis B or C, the two most common forms of chronic viral Hepatitis. Both Hepatitis B and C are viruses that can cause chronic inflammation in the liver. Over the course of years this can lead to scarring in the liver and ultimately cirrhosis—severe scarring and fibrosis of the liver where liver function can be comprised. Additionally, these chronic viruses, particularly Hepatitis B, can increase the risk of developing a primary cancer of the liver called hepatocellular cancer. The liver, unlike, say, the appendix, is a vital organ that—among other functions—stores and helps process nutrients, detoxifies and filters blood, and produces blood coagulants. In short, the liver is vital to life and a failing liver absent a liver transplant means trouble.

The best first step to combating these viruses is awareness. It is important to know the risk factors for these viruses and get tested if you are at risk. Hepatitis B and C differ somewhat in risk factors and transmission. With an estimated 350 million people worldwide who are carriers (most commonly in Asia and Africa), chronic Hepatitis B is the most common chronic virus of the liver. It is most often transmitted by birth or through blood-borne or sexual contact. Hepatitis B is not transmitted through ....

Swedish Disseminates Information Intended to Educate, Clarify Medicare Charge Data, Related Questions

SEATTLE, June 24, 2013 - As part of the Obama administration’s work to make the United States health-care system more affordable and accountable, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released 2011 data in early May that shows significant variation across the country and within communities in what providers charge for common services. These data include information comparing the charges for the 100 most common inpatient services and 30 common outpatient services.  Providers determine what they will charge for items and services provided to patients and these charges are the average amount the providers bill for an item or service. The following information is intended to help patients and family members better understand this complicated topic.

Thrive Through Cancer Presents Chemo-Con at Swedish Cancer Institute

Thrive Through Cancer is a non-profit organization that helps young adults with cancer and their caregivers find hope and thrive. Through support groups, social events and community forums, Thrive Through Cancer aims to engage young adult community members by providing support and resources during their fight against cancer.

On June 20, 2013 Thrive Through Cancer will host a social event for young adults, their families, friends and caregivers at the Swedish Cancer Institute: Chemo-Con!

Come meet Rose Egge, founder of Thrive Through Cancer, and join us for two educational and interactive workshops focused on issues commonly experienced by young adults affected by cancer.

  • Join Registered Dietician Julie Herbst for a conversation about healthy eating, maximizing nutritional intake and managing symptoms with foods. Recipe and sampling provided.
  • Jacci Thompson-Dodd, MA, MSSS will host a discussion about intimacy and cancer, and can help answer any questions you may have. 

You will also have the opportunity to learn more about community partners, resources and services available in areas near you from the following organizations:

Hearing loss in the workplace

Hearing loss is a term that many associate with an aging population. For some it may trigger memories of large, obvious and obtrusive hearing aids or devices that squealed!  This is not the reality in 2013.  A look at the individuals I see every day as an audiologist reveals a large number of employed professionals who are encountering difficulty in work environments.  From telephone work to conference and lunch meetings, hearing loss is impacting our workforce.

The National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) estimates that nearly 1 in 5 Americans between the ages of 45-64 years of age experience hearing loss.  The prevalence of hearing loss increases with age and with an aging workforce that includes many working well into their 70s, it should be noted that the incidence of hearing loss increases to 1 in 3 for Americans between the ages of 65-74 years of age.  We now have a culture of employment that includes unique viewpoints from four generations working side by side.   Many of us are aware that intergenerational communication styles may vary.  It would behoove us to also consider hearing loss as we think about intergenerational communication in the workplace. 

Individuals who work in a quiet or solitary environment may “get by” with their hearing loss. However, most individuals will encounter much more complex listening environments at work. Imagine if you had hearing loss and were required to listen in the following environments:

  • Working in a cubicle environment where colleagues speak from behind or speak over/through walls.
  • Participating in conference calls and telephone calls in which there are no visual cues to supplement the speaker’s voice.
  • Participating in conference room meetings where distance can create a barrier in the ability to hear individuals around the table.
  • Listening to individuals with ...
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