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Treating tennis elbow with platelet rich plasma

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is concentrated blood plasma containing a large amount of platelets. This concentrate, which is derived from your whole blood, is rich in growth factors that help heal injured tendons, ligaments, muscles, and even cartilage.  PRP is injected into the affected region to stimulate and enhance healing. Unlike cortisone injections, PRP helps heal the injured tissue and improve its function.  One of the most common areas of treatment with PRP is tennis elbow. 

Recently, a large study on PRP for tennis elbow was published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine.  They found success rates for patients with 24 weeks of follow-up were 83.9% in the PRP group compared with 68.3% in the control group. No significant complications occurred in either group. 
 
In the news, New York Yankees pitcher Masahiro Tanaka sustained a partially torn ulnar collateral ligament in his pitching elbow. He was ...

How to Manage a Sports Related Concussion

What is a concussion?
A concussion is a mild brain injury that causes a change in mental status that can occur with direct insult to the head. A concussion may also occur with movement of the body that cause acceleration/deceleration forces to the head.
 
What are the symptoms of a concussion?
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Amnesia
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Confusion
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Difficulty balancing
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Sensitivity to noise
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Drowsiness
  • Irritability
  • Sadness
When should I seek medical attention for a concussion?
  • A healthcare provider should evaluate every child or adolescent suspected of a concussion. 
  • If this occurs during a sporting event, the child should sit out the rest of the game
  • Your provider may conduct a standardized neuropsych assessment to help guide return to activities/sports
What is the best treatment for a concussion?
  • Rest, rest and more rest!
  • Absence from school may initially be necessary until one can concentrate on a task without exacerbating symptoms
  • Avoid excessive time texting, on the computer, watching television, playing video games or listening to loud music
  • Return to activity too soon can lead to worsening and prolonged symptoms.  A second injury to the brain while the brain is healing can lead to severe brain injury that is life-threatening
When can a child return to sports after a concussion?
A person with a concussion should not return to play until they no longer have symptoms at rest for at least 24 hours.  Return to play should then be a step-wise progression.  The child/adolescent should be symptom free for 24 hours before progressing to the next level of play:
  • Light aerobic exercise (e.g.: walking)
  • Sport-specific exercise
  • Non-contact training drills
  • Full contact practice
  • Return to play (Must first be cleared by a provider)
What resources are there for concussions?
Swedish’s Spine, Sports and Musculoskeletal Medicine team has developed a Sports Concussion Clinic with the following resources:
  • Baseline neurocognitive testing with a computerized exam called ImPACT can be done prior to playing a sport to assess changes and recovery if a concussion occurs.
  • Comprehensive concussion management, including clearance for return-to-play
Click here to learn more about the Sports Concussion clinic.  The team includes sports medicine physicians, psychiatrists, an athletic trainer, physical therapists and a neuropsychologist that can deliver individualized care for every athlete

New nutrition labels, same healthy eating advice

We all know that as a nation, we are getting bigger and heavier. Worse still, our future - our children- are becoming obese and unhealthy at increasingly younger ages. For decades, the scourge of obesity was blamed on a high calorie, high fat diet. Turns out, we have probably been doing it wrong all these years and our bulging waistline attests to this colossal failure. Research and the medical community now have increasing evidence that the real villain of the story is a very sweet little molecule called fructose. Fructose is what gives us the sweetness in table sugar (sucrose)…also in brown sugar, honey, agave, and of course, high fructose corn syrup. Call it by any name, but sugars are dangerous to our health. Fructose is addictive, much in the same way as alcohol and illicit drugs are. In fact, sugar (fructose) metabolism closely replicates alcohol metabolism except for the acute effects on brain. Sugar has been likened to alcohol without the buzz!

You may already have heard about First Lady Michelle Obama’s work with the FDA which has led to newly proposed changes to nutrition labels on packaged foods. The amount of sugars, specifically, “added sugars” will be part of that new label. I am not implying that a zero added sugar diet will be the panacea for the pandemic of obesity and ill health. We still need to eat healthy and exercise right. There is no magic pill, no startling new advice. Remember what our grandmothers used to say:
 

Tips for keeping young athletes safe and healthy

We all know exercise is an important factor in maintaining an active and healthy life. However, over-exercising can lead to a rare, but serious complication known as rhabdomyolysis – a medical team that literally means ‘dissolution or destruction of skeletal muscle’. There has been a recent increase in rhabdomyolysis amongst teen athletes so it is important to recognize the warning signs and learn how to prevent them.

The classic triad of rhabdomyolysis is dark urine, muscle weakness or fatigue, and muscle pain. Although exercise can be the primary factor, other key contributing elements such as dehydration, genetic conditions (e.g. sickle cell), metabolic disorders, nutritional supplements, drug use, and heat stress can exacerbate muscle damage. Without appropriate medical evaluation and care, rhabdomyolysis can cause permanent damage to the kidneys and may even be life-threatening in severe cases. Here are some tips to help your young athlete remain active and healthy:

  1. Maintain adequate hydration – preferably with plain water.  Sports and energy drinks may often contain caffeine and excessive amounts of sugar which can cause dehydration.  On average, children that are 6-10 years old should have about 1L of fluid a day, children 10-14 years old should have 1.5L/day and teens over 14 years should have at least 2L of fluid a day. It is important to increase fluids with increased activity due to the additional fluid losses that occur.
  2. Eliminate protein supplements. A recent study by the American Academy of Pediatrics found ...

9 tips for avoiding holiday weight gain

Amongst the cheer and merriment, parties and soirées, often come unwanted extra pounds that sneak their way around our waistlines. The span between Thanksgiving and New Years are filled with traditions and an extra average weight gain of 1-2 pounds. It may not sound like much, but consider over the course of a decade that can lead to an extra 10-20 pounds.  That extra luggage then leads to another tradition - the New Year’s resolution to lose weight!

Stop the insanity and start eating smart. Simple lifestyle changes will put an end to the cycle of overindulging, weight gain, and feeling miserable once the season is over. It is said the best offense is a good defense. By practicing these time-honored tips, you’ll likely feel fulfillment without getting overfilled.

1. Plan ahead.

If you know the party you are headed to will lack healthy options (hello, cookie exchange!) have a low-calorie, high protein snack prior to attending a party. This will keep your appetite in check and you will be less likely to arrive ravenous and overeat.  Hummus with vegetables, whole grain crackers and low-fat cheese, a piece of fruit with natural peanut butter, or Greek Yogurt with high fiber cereal are a few great choices to tide you over. Pair foods that are high in protein and rich in fiber to keep you satiated longer. At the party, keep to light appetizers.

2. Host a healthy holiday.

Control the nutritional content of the meal by throwing the party yourself. Plan the dinner menu with lean meats and seafood, fresh vegetables, fruits, whole-grains, beans, and low-fat dairy. Use the opportunity to try healthy recipes from sites such as www.cooklinglight.com and www.eatingright.com (Ed. Note – check out our healthy recipe collection here or on Pinterest.) In lieu of a potluck, have party guests bring non-perishable foods to donate to the food bank.

3. Lighten up your menu.

Revamp your recipes by ...

Swedish Sports Concussion Clinic

The Sports Concussion Clinic at Swedish Spine, Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine was developed to provide comprehensive concussion management and help guide return-to-play decisions for children and adults. We are a team of sports medicine physicians, physiatrists, physical therapists, and a neuropsychologist that deliver individual care for athletes. We provide physical evaluation, assessment of concussion severity, neuropsychological evaluation, ongoing monitoring and education for athletes, parents, coaches and school staff. We use clinical guidelines to implement the most appropriate treatment for return-to-play and return-to-school. Click here to learn more or to make an appointment.

No-Cook Meals for Multiple Sclerosis - Week 4: Southwest Chop Salad

It may be the last official week of summer, but this no-cook meal for multiple sclerosis can be enjoyed during any season. This salad’s simple ingredients are available year-round. Make it now and enjoy it again when you need a break from winter weather.

Recipe: Southwest Chop Salad

 

Super Food: Avocado

The oleic acid in avocados will help keep you satisfied and full. Oleic acid tells the body to ...

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