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'Swedish Cares for Women' posts

What you should know about Long Acting Reversible Contraceptives or IUDs

Does it seem that more of your friends are using IUDs or contraceptive implants?  IUDs, intrauterine devices, and contraceptive implants are becoming more popular in the United States.  In this post, we will discuss these birth control methods and why they are gaining in popularity. 

IUDs are plastic devices that are placed in the uterus by a healthcare provider.  There are three products available in the U.S.:

Dealing with vaginal dryness

One of the more annoying situations that many of my patients have been in is having painful intercourse due to vaginal dryness. In general the cause of dryness of the vaginal tissue is lack of estrogen. This can occur postpartum, especially in women who are breastfeeding a baby, and it can occur just before and during menopause.

When estrogen is in the body, one of the effects of estrogen is to ...

Managing pain during labor

One of the most common concerns women have during their pregnancy is how to manage pain during labor and delivery.  Labor pain may be more or less intense than you expected, or may hurt in a different way. It is hard to predict how any labor will go or how anyone will respond to pain.

Labor pain is due to contractions of the muscles of the uterus and by pressure on the cervix. This can feel like strong cramping in the abdomen, groin, and back. Some women experience pain in their sides or thighs as well. Women can also feel pressure on the bladder and bowels by the baby's head and the stretching of the birth canal and vagina. Some find the hardest part is not the contraction itself, but the fact that the contractions keep coming.  

One of the best ways to alleviate fears for women is to learn about the available strategies for coping with pain. There are both medical and non-medical tools that may be a good match for you.

While you are deciding, think about what appeals to you most. Ask your health care provider these questions:

How to get the most out of your OB/GYN appointment

Unless you are having a baby, seeing an OB/GYN often makes women feel very nervous.  This can lead to forgetting questions, forgetting important information about your condition and leaving feeling dissatisfied.

In order to get the most out of your appointment here are some simple tips:

1. Come prepared!
  • Bring a list of your medications; this can help us be sure that anything we prescribe will be safe for you.  Your problem may also be related to your medication – for example, blood thinners can cause heavy periods.
  • Know your family history. Things that are important for OB/GYNs to know include family member with blood clots, recurrent (more than 3) miscarriages, family members with cancer of the breast, ovary, uterus or colon (bowel.)  It is also helpful to know the age they were diagnosed.
  • Bring a list of questions! The more you ask, the more you’ll know.  We want our patients to be well informed so that we can help you make the right treatment plan for you. Also, there may not be time to go over everything in one appointment so make sure you start with what is important to you.
2. Check your inhibitions at the door!
  • Trust me, we have seen and heard everything and there is very little than can shock us! It is important that you are open and honest so that we can make sure we understand exactly what is going on to come up with the right diagnosis. 
  • It is likely that ...

To Mammogram or Not to Mammogram? A note on recent studies

A Canadian medical research study has recently been published questioning the value of doing screening mammograms on women in their forties. The article has spurred controversy because the results contradict multiple other similar research studies which showed that women in that age group who get regular mammograms actually are spared death from breast cancer more often that women who are not invited to screening.

Some problems with the methods of Canadian study, published in the journal BMJ, were pointed out by a scientist at the University of Washington, Judith Malmgren, who has worked with Swedish Medical Center doctors to see how women in their forties have fared in our system. Click here to read Dr. Malmgren’s letter to the editor of BMJ.

There are two ironic features to the Canadian study. First, the authors say it is okay for women to not get screening starting in their forties “when adjuvant therapy for breast cancer is readily available.” This means that it is okay to diagnose breast cancer later because you can mop up bigger and more advanced cancers with treatment like chemotherapy, radiation and bigger surgery. But at Swedish, we do not think that many women prefer more severe therapy rather than earlier detection.

Secondly ...

4 alternatives to a hysterectomy

There are many reasons women need a hysterectomy.

Some of the most common are:

  • Heavy periods that are not controlled on hormones or an inability to take hormones to control the period.
  • Large fibroids that press on the bladder or the bowel, or are so large they can be felt on the abdomen.
  • Endometriosis (usually if this is requiring a hysterectomy it is due to both pain and bleeding).
There are several treatments to avoid hysterectomy:

  • Uterine artery embolization where microscopic plastic beads are inserted into the uterine arteries to block the majority of blood flow to the uterus.  This causes the uterus to slowly shrink in size.  The uterus may decrease to half of its normal size within 2-3 years.  Initially there is a lot of inflammation of the uterus as it loses its blood supply.  The pain associated with this will usually require ibuprofen and narcotics.  Most women stay in the hospital for overnight, and it is usually about 2 weeks before you are feeling well enough to resume normal activities.
  • Myomectomy, a surgical removal of the fibroids.  There are two ...

Dozens of Swedish-Affiliated Physicians Recognized as 'Top Doctors' by Their Peers



SEATTLE, August 16, 2013 - Now in its 13th year, Seattle magazine recently published the results of their annual 'Top Doctors' survey in the July issue. As in past years, dozens of Swedish-affiliated (or credentialed) physicians were recognized in the popular issue due to being nominated by their peers.

Additionally, Seattle Metropolitan magazine published the results of its 'Top Doctors' survey in the August issue, in which dozens of Swedish-affiliated (or credentialed) physicians were also featured

 

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