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KOMO News reports on new FDA-approved device tested at Swedish

KOMO News has posted a story on the recent premarket approval by the Food & Drug Administration of a device designed to detect and treat epilepsy.

The story quotes Ryder Gwinn, M.D., medical director of the Swedish Neurosciences Institute Center for Neuromodulation and Functional Restoration

Testing on the NeuroPace device began in 2004 and was conducted throughout the United States, including the Swedish Neuroscience Institute. Today, Swedish is the only center in the Pacific Northwest approved to implant the device.

Read the full story on KOMOnews.com.

Seattle Brain Cancer Walk Raises $485,000 for Cancer Research and New Treatment Options

SEATTLE – Oct. 18, 2013 – More than 2,800 patients, survivors, family members and supporters participated in the 6th annual Seattle Brain Cancer Walk on Sept. 21, which raised more than $485,000 for medical research, clinical trials, advocacy and comprehensive care for brain cancer patients in the Pacific Northwest.

The Walk is one of the largest fundraisers of its kind, bringing the community together to celebrate and support those who have been impacted by brain cancer. Founded in 2008 by Greg Foltz, M.D., and a group of committed volunteers and families, the Walk has raised $2.9 million to fund critical research projects and to keep hope alive for the brain cancer community.  

The Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment (Ivy Center) at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute is committed to translating the results of its research into effective treatment options for patients. Much of the work conducted at the Ivy Center is funded through the Walk. When combined with research support from The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation and other gifts from the community, the Ivy Center has become one of the leading clinical and translational research centers in the country focusing on finding better treatments for brain cancer.

World-Renowned Neurosurgeon Dr. Johnny Delashaw Joins Swedish Neuroscience Institute

SEATTLE — October, 16 2013 — Swedish Medical Center, Seattle’s leading nonprofit health care provider, announced today that Johnny Delashaw, M.D. will join Swedish Neuroscience Institute as a staff neurosurgeon. The Swedish Neuroscience Institute includes a team of world-renowned neurosurgeons and neurologists dedicated to the diagnosis, treatment and research of brain, spine and central nervous system ailments.

 

Study Makes Waves in Treating Essential Tremor

The treatment of neurologic disease took a major step forward this past week with the publication of a clinical trial that used ultrasound waves to treat Essential Tremor.  Essential tremor affects about 10 million people in the USA and can be extremely disabling. For patients that fail medical therapy invasive surgical options are considered, including deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS surgeries involve drilling a hole in the skull and implanting an electrode into structures deep in the brain to turn off the unwanted signals that cause the tremor.

A study of 15 patients lead by Dr. Jeff Elias (University of Virginia) was published in the New England Journal of Medicine this week and describes how researchers used ultrasound waves to effectively treat Essential tremor non-invasively – no cutting or drilling:

 

Heat Sensitivity and Multiple Sclerosis: Resources to help cool off MS symptoms

The summer months have arrived and the weather is warming up. While many sun-deprived residents of the Pacific Northwest are enjoying more sunshine, many people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience a temporary worsening of their symptoms when the weather gets warmer.

Air conditioners, fans, and cooling products like vests and neck wraps can help keep the body cool and prevent or reverse the symptoms. But what if you can’t afford it, or think your income is too high to get financial assistance?

Multiple sclerosis MRI technique can spot tissue damage months before an MS attack

A study published in this week’s Neurology found that a relatively new MRI technique could spot changes in the brain up to three months before inflammation causes a multiple sclerosis (MS) attack.

Traditionally, we have viewed MS as a disease where the immune system attacks the brain, causing the abrupt onset of inflammation (measured by gadolinium enhancement). This inflammation causes damage to the brain, which causes symptoms.

The new technique, called susceptibility-weighted imaging, allows researchers to see that tissue damage is happening up to three months prior to the inflammation.

Susceptibility-weighted imaging measures the amount of magnetic susceptibility of tissues aligned in different directions. The amount of alignment in different directions is called the phase image. In tissues like myelin, the magnetic susceptibility lines up with the direction of the myelin because molecules can move alongside the myelin more easily than they can move across it.

When myelin is damaged, the tissue becomes disorganized and magnetic susceptibility changes from aligning primarily in one direction to alignment in many different directions. The phase image can be used to measure the degree of myelin damage.

In this study, 20 patients ...

Seattle Channel highlights Swedish MS Center research

Thousands of people are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) each year. The Pacific Northwest is home to more than 12,000 people living with the disease. Our area is also making great strides in research to find the cause and new treatments for MS.

The Seattle Channel featured a health special Thursday documenting the lives people affected by the disease and the progress area doctors and scientists are making. In the health special, the Seattle Channel highlights research at the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center that is advancing what we know and how docs treat the disease.

Watch the video for the full story, including an interview with Dr. James Bowen, a neurologist specializing in multiple sclerosis at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute, and a look inside the MS Center at Swedish:

 
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