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New medication for MS, Tecfidera (BG-12), Approved by FDA

On March 27, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the newest treatment in the increasing number of disease modifying therapies (DMTs) available to treat multiple sclerosis. Tecfidera (BG-12) is an oral capsule to treat adults with relapsing forms of MS. Research participants at the MS Center at Swedish participated in clinical trials for Tecfidera.

 

The trials reported that people taking Tecfidera had fewer relapses and less frequent worsening of disability compared to people taking a placebo. There were also fewer and less-severe side effects with Tecfidera than other treatments.

 

The studies found that ...

Stride with Swedish April 14 for Multiple Sclerosis

Every hour, someone is diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). And every day, people from around the Pacific Northwest and United States visit the MS Center at Swedish to learn how to live well with the disease.

Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the nervous system that affects the brain, eyes and spinal cord that takes a unique course in every patient. We’re with people on their journey, whether they are newly diagnosed or have been living with MS for decades. Patients and families share their lives with our treatment team and, in turn, we put our passion into helping them achieve their highest wellbeing.

Participating in Walk MS one way we show our commitment to caring for the MS community.

Swedish Presents Research at 2013 AAN Annual Meeting

Neurologists and neuroscience professionals this week from around the world gathered at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego. The Multiple Sclerosis Center at Swedish Neuroscience Institute was pleased to co-author a few research trials presented at the meeting:

 

Teriflunomide and pregnancy

Dr. Lily Jung-Henson speaking at the AAN 65th Annual MeetingDr. Lily Jung-Henson, neurologist and Chief of Staff at Swedish Issaquah, spoke on behalf of a team of researchers about teriflunomide and a report on the safety of women who became pregnant on the medication. Teriflunomide is a once-daily, oral disease-modifying therapy (DMT) recently approved in the United States to treat relapsing multiple sclerosis. Clinical trials for teriflunomide took place among the many research studies for new treatments Swedish Neuroscience Institute offers patients with multiple sclerosis. (Read the full abstract here.)

Subset of a trial looking at endurance effects of Dalfampridine (AMPYRA®)

Dr. Angeli Mayadev, physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist at the MS Center, participated in this study of a medication to improve walking speed in people with MS. Dalfampridine -ER 10 mg twice daily significantly improved 6-minute walking distance compared to placebo. Dalfampridine 5 mg twice daily did not improve distance compared to placebo. Researchers also found that ....

New Cancer Center to Open April 1 at Swedish/Edmonds; Outpatient Facility to Provide Medical Oncology, Infusion Services Close to Home


 
 


  
Cancer-Center-Opening-2.jpg

Swedish Cancer Institute at Edmonds opens to the public at an April 17 ribbon-cutting ceremony on the Swedish/Edmonds campus. (Left to right) David Loud, aide from Congressman Jim McDermott, M.D.; Swedish Cancer Institute Medical Oncologist Richard McGee, M.D.; Swedish/Edmonds Chief Executive Dave Jaffe; and Swedish Cancer Institute Executive Director Thomas D. Brown, M.D., MBA, cut the ribbon during the event that attracted 250 visitors. The two-story facility, located at 21632 Highway 99 in Edmonds, provides high-quality and comprehensive medical oncology to patients through an infusion unit, laboratory, pharmacy, and access to Swedish’s electronic medical record system.
 
EDMONDS, WASH.
, March 21, 2013 – Swedish Health Services will open a new outpatient cancer center at the Edmonds campus on Monday, April 1, 2013 in response to the growing need for medical oncology and infusion (chemotherapy) services in the south Snohomish and north King County area. The new two-story, 17,102-square-foot facility is anticipated to handle as many as 175 patient visits each day and provide increased access to cancer-care services for people living north of Seattle.

MS Research Update: Pulse therapy for breakthrough multiple sclerosis

A small pilot study from the University of Southern California suggests a pulse adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy could be effective in patients with breakthrough multiple sclerosis attacks while on beta-interferon. “Breakthrough” attacks that occur after starting a disease modifying therapy (DMT).

 

The study compared the safety and benefits of monthly pulse ACTH to monthly methylprednisone (MP) pulse in patients on beta-interferon. Over 15 months, researchers found that those treated with ACTH had fewer relapses and fewer psychiatric side effects. ACTH gel is currently used to treat MS relapses, but researchers note it may be able to alter the body’s immune responses beyond producing steroids.

 

As I discussed with the Medscape reporter, Megan Brooks, last week, the results of this study are ....

Clinical Trials and Personalized Medicine - Interpreting Studies

Medicine does not search for truth. It searches for cure. It does not look for the universal, it tries to create exceptions.

Medicine emerged from witchcraft. It has always utilized the most advanced technology of its day. Medical models and reasoning always evolve and that evolution makes the previous model obsolete. One of the foundation models of modern medicine is the randomized controlled clinical trial.

The principal of the randomized controlled clinical trial is that a single observation needs to be validated and reproduced. The clinical trial provides an estimate of how often a particular observation will occur. It tells us that chemotherapy improves survival for patients with non-small cell lung cancer at one year from 20% to 29%. It tells us that FOLFOX treatment for advanced colon cancer gives a median time to progression of 8.7 months, response rate of 45%, and median survival time of 19.5 Months. This is accurate information about populations. It's use for the individual is a difficult problem.

Every person is a unit, no one is 20% or 29% or 45%. The question is...

SNI Research Aims to Expand Cerebral Palsy Therapy Options

Before they learn to crawl or walk, about 10,000 babies every year in the United States will develop a condition that will change how they will do just that. Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurological condition caused by a brain injury before birth, during delivery or before a child’s second birthday. An estimated 800,000 Americans live with CP.

The most common symptom in CP is spasticity, an increase in muscle tension that impairs proper movement. Abnormal postures or movements, weakness or loss of muscle control and rigidity are also part of the constellation of CP signs and symptoms. While physical therapy remains the cornerstone for treatment, new medications and therapies for CP are being developed to help improve and manage symptoms.

Currently, Swedish Neuroscience Institute is participating in a study to determine the safety and tolerability of one such medication. Dalfampridine (AMPYRA ®) is a medication currently used to help improve walking speed in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. This phase I clinical trial aims to evaluate AMPYRA’s® safety, tolerability and its effect on sensorimotor function of adults with CP. The study will look at how single and multiple doses of the medication have on CP patients, including:

  • Hand strength
  • Manual dexterity
  • Walking speed
  • Gait

There is no cure for cerebral palsy. Therapies for CP ...

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