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How to give safe gifts to children during the holidays

As the holidays approach, parents often wonder what toys are safe for their little ones.  When making your list and checking it twice, here are some tips to ensure that toys are appropriate for the age and developmental stage of your giftees.

For younger children/infants:

  • Make sure all parts are larger than the child’s mouth.  Most children age 3 and under consistently put toys in their mouth, and some older children do as well.  A small-parts tester, or “no-choke tube” is about the size of a small child’s airway and can be purchased to test parts if you are unsure.  If a part or toy fits inside the tube, it’s too small to be safe.
  • When buying stuffed toys, look for embroidered or secured parts rather than pieces (such as eyes or noses) that could be removed and swallowed.  Remove all loose strings and ribbons.  Avoid animals with stuffing made of small pellets or material that could cause choking. Be aware that stuffed toys given away at carnivals, fairs, or in vending machines are not required to meet safety standards, so be especially careful with these!
  • When buying hanging toys for cribs, ensure that the child cannot grab any portion, and that strings or wires are short.  These types of toys should be removed when the infant can push up onto his or her hands and knees.
  • Keep plush toys and loose, soft bedding out of the cribs of infants and young children as these can cause suffocation.

For all children:

  • Look for labeling on the package that indicates what ages the toy is appropriate for.  Remember that this doesn’t have to do with how smart your child is, it is based on physical and developmental skills for his or her age group and should be followed.
  • Ensure that batteries are  ....

Infant and Child Development is not about ‘stuff’

When we are bombarded by information and products, how are we as new parents supposed to decipher what is in the best interest of our child when it comes to their development? 

Parents can quickly become bombarded with information about everything they need to do to optimize the first months of their child’s very impressionable life. A new, overwhelmed, sleep deprived parent can find everything from music for math skills, swaddling positioners for longer sleep, bottles for better speech development, and even multiple equipment options to speed up a child’s progression for walking.  Today there are so many items available for purchase that if a person wanted to, they could  go through an entire day never having to hold, cuddle, snuggle, whisper, sing, gaze, laugh, or touch their baby…..and that is exactly the point.  When it comes right down to it, the best things that we can provide for our babies development has nothing to do with the “stuff”!

Here’s what advertisements for most baby products don’t tell you:

Bedwetting during travel or holiday season

It’s November already and the holidays are right around the corner.  For a lot of families, this means either traveling to visit others, or out of town family members will be coming to celebrate. For families who have a child experiencing wetting accidents (day or night time), this can pose a challenge for both. For the child, they can experience embarrassment and shame, with a fear of having an accident in someone else’s home, or in a different environment (i.e. sleeping in someone else’s bed). For the parent(s) it’s a concern of how to manage the logistics of the wetting accidents. This combined with the hustle and bustle of the holiday season adds stressors for everyone, taking away some of the fun and enjoyment of the season.

Here are some tips to help both you and your child successfully manage this scenario:

  • Supplies to have on hand or pack when traveling:
    • Waterproof disposable underwear (pull ups) – pack more than you think you will need just in case
    • Protective vinyl pants – these look just like regular underwear and can be worn over pull ups for added protection
    • Waterproof overlays or disposable underpads – these protective pads have an absorbent layer and a waterproof layer. They can be placed right on top of regular sheets and can be swapped out for a clean one if they become wet or soiled.
    • If your child will be sleeping in a sleeping bag, there are waterproof sleeping bag liners available
    • Large plastic bags – pack plenty in case of an accident. They help isolate any odor and are a sanitary way to store any wet underwear, pajamas or bedding
    • Clothing that is machine washable
    • A urine stain or odor remover
       
  • Talk with your child about ...

4th Annual Holidays at the Hospital at Swedish

We hope you can join us for a winter wonderland celebration for Swedish Pediatric patients, families, & friends!

This is a free, fun, and festive holiday celebration for the community that will feature:

  • Carolers
  • Photos with Santa
  • Teddy Bear Clinic
  • Cookie decorating
  • Holiday activities and crafts tables
  • Plus, we’ll have a super special guest from the Seattle Sounders, Roger Levesque!

We’ll also be collecting toys for children up to age 18 as well as donations for art supplies and games. Donated items will be given to children at the hospital receiving care and treatment.

Where:
Swedish First Hill
1101 Madison, Medical Tower Lobby
Seattle, WA 98122
**Free parking is available on the street or in the Marion and Minor parking garage

When:
 

Swedish Sports Concussion Clinic

The Sports Concussion Clinic at Swedish Spine, Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine was developed to provide comprehensive concussion management and help guide return-to-play decisions for children and adults. We are a team of sports medicine physicians, physiatrists, physical therapists, and a neuropsychologist that deliver individual care for athletes. We provide physical evaluation, assessment of concussion severity, neuropsychological evaluation, ongoing monitoring and education for athletes, parents, coaches and school staff. We use clinical guidelines to implement the most appropriate treatment for return-to-play and return-to-school. Click here to learn more or to make an appointment.

More tips for feeding picky eaters

In my last post, I shared a few tips about what to expect and how to help encourage your child to eat more. Here are some more tips to help your child eat more variety of foods, including more vegetables:

How can I get my child to eat more variety?

  • Offer a "nibble tray". At snack time, fill a muffin tin or ice cube tray with bite-sized portions of colorful, nutritious foods. Try cooked macaroni, cheese cubes, kidney beans, grape halves, broccoli florets, ready-to- eat cereal, and canned pineapple tidbits.
  • Let children cook. Your child is more likely to eat what he has helped to make.
  • Children can help wash vegetables, tear up lettuce, scrub potatoes, or stir batter.
  • Be playful. Call these finger foods playful names that a two-year-old can appreciate, such as: apple moons (thinly sliced), avocado boats (a quarter of an avocado), banana wheels, broccoli trees (steamed broccoli florets), carrot swords (cooked and thinly sliced), cheese building blocks, egg canoes (hard- boiled egg wedges), little O's (o-shaped cereal). "Olive or raspberry fingers" are much more appealing to be nibbled off their fingertips.
  • Serve new foods over and over again. A food not eaten at first may ...

Healthy tips for parents and kids to help prevent the spread of colds and the flu

Summer has ended, the kids are back in school, and fall is officially here. Which means….cold and flu season is upon us! Hospitals are already seeing documented cases of seasonal influenza. There are no known cures for colds and flu, so cold and flu prevention should be your goal.

Why do we care about preventing influenza? The flu can be very dangerous for children, causing illness, hospital stays and death each year. The CDC (Center for Disease Control) reports about 20,000 children below the age of 5 are hospitalized from flu complications each year.

The most effective way for preventing the flu is to get the flu shot. It works better than anything else. (Flu vaccination is recommended for all children aged 6 months and older). There are additional strategies you can employ to help ward off those nasty viruses.

Here are 6 tips you can use to help prevent colds and the flu:

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