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'Pediatric Urology' posts

How to prepare your child for a stay at the hospital

We all know that Swedish provides top-notch pediatric services for the emergent needs of children and their families.  You may be surprised to find out that many children come to Swedish for a planned inpatient stay as well.  There can be various reasons why a child and their family might be anticipating a hospital stay.  Some examples may include having a surgical procedure that requires them to be monitored for a set period of time afterward, neurological video monitoring, or medical preparations for a procedure the following day.

Regardless of what service your child will be receiving at the hospital, there are ways in which you can better prepare them and yourself for what to expect during your stay.

At Swedish, Child Life Specialists help children and families cope with the hospital process.  Child Life Specialists are available to help educate and prepare children and families prior to surgery and/or an inpatient stay.  Some tips on how to prepare your child for an inpatient stay include .....

Helping kids heal with music and technology

A young girl is cowering in the corner - it is the first day her care-taker has left her side. She has backed herself into a corner as far from anyone as possible. She appears to be filled with anxiety. Staff members and nurses try calming her, but nothing seems to work.

With her back turned, the little girl doesn’t notice a young man entering the room. He is holding a tool, one of which the full power and potential is still unknown to most. Even though he has witnessed its abilities before, what happens next still takes even him by surprise.

Not knowing what to say, he says nothing at all. He lifts his instrument and strikes the first chord. The girl stops. He continues to play. The girl turns and slides to the floor. The young man sinks to his knees, the same level as the girl. Strumming his ukulele the young man begins to sing. The little girl begins to scoot herself across the floor, 20 feet to where the young man kneels, closer and closer until her knees touch his.

There are gasps coming from the doorway, as a handful of hospital staff and nurses witness to an amazing transformation. In a flip of a switch, the little girl went from utter anxiety to calm and happy, soothed by the sound of music. As the young man finishes his song, the little girl smiles, reaches out her hand to touch his, then falls back, smiling and laughing.


This is the story of Melodic Caring Project Founder, Levi Ware, on his most recent visit to provide live music to pediatric patients at Swedish First Hill.

“I've been playing music for a long time and I've seen a lot of amazing things happen when music is introduced into certain situations. What happened on the Pediatric Unit at Swedish was one of the most wonderful, beautiful and undeniably powerful music experiences I've had.  ...

If your newborn is diagnosed with hypospadias

As a pediatric urologist, I am frequently asked to consult with parents whose newborn son has hypospadias.  

Hypospadias is usually diagnosed during the physical exam right after the baby is born.  When parents see the abnormal penile anatomy they naturally want to learn about the diagnosis and understand what, if anything, needs to be done. Answering these questions, discussing options, and performing reconstructive surgery to help restore normal penis appearance and function are some of the most rewarding things I do as a pediatric urologist. 

I would like parents who have a son born with hypospadias to be reassured that the anatomy can be reconstructed, the surgery is well tolerated, and a good outcome with a normal, or near normal, penis appearance and function can be achieved.

It is not urgent to treat newborns with hypospadias because they can usually pee (urinate) just fine through their existing urinary opening.

In fact, when hypospadias is the only condition noted in a newborn physical exam there is a low chance of additional developmental abnormalities. Additional tests and studies on the baby are usually not necessary.

It is important to note that if any unusual shape of the penis or urethral opening (where the pee comes out) is present then circumcision (if desired) should not be performed until after the child is examined by a pediatric urologist. This is because the pediatric urologist may need to use the foreskin tissue for the surgical repair. 

Here are answers to some commonly asked questions:  

Bedwetting during travel or holiday season

It’s November already and the holidays are right around the corner.  For a lot of families, this means either traveling to visit others, or out of town family members will be coming to celebrate. For families who have a child experiencing wetting accidents (day or night time), this can pose a challenge for both. For the child, they can experience embarrassment and shame, with a fear of having an accident in someone else’s home, or in a different environment (i.e. sleeping in someone else’s bed). For the parent(s) it’s a concern of how to manage the logistics of the wetting accidents. This combined with the hustle and bustle of the holiday season adds stressors for everyone, taking away some of the fun and enjoyment of the season.

Here are some tips to help both you and your child successfully manage this scenario:

  • Supplies to have on hand or pack when traveling:
    • Waterproof disposable underwear (pull ups) – pack more than you think you will need just in case
    • Protective vinyl pants – these look just like regular underwear and can be worn over pull ups for added protection
    • Waterproof overlays or disposable underpads – these protective pads have an absorbent layer and a waterproof layer. They can be placed right on top of regular sheets and can be swapped out for a clean one if they become wet or soiled.
    • If your child will be sleeping in a sleeping bag, there are waterproof sleeping bag liners available
    • Large plastic bags – pack plenty in case of an accident. They help isolate any odor and are a sanitary way to store any wet underwear, pajamas or bedding
    • Clothing that is machine washable
    • A urine stain or odor remover
       
  • Talk with your child about ...

What causes bedwetting and when to be concerned

Bedwetting (also called nocturnal enuresis) is a very common childhood problem.  The number of children with this problem varies by age. For example, at five years of age, an average of 16% of children will have a bedwetting accident.  By 15 years of age and older, 1-2 % continue to wet the bed.  For most children, this will improve or resolve without any treatment as they get older.

What can cause bedwetting?

Bedwetting may be related to one or more of the following:

  • The child’s bladder holds a smaller than normal amount
  • Genetics (parents who had nocturnal enuresis as a child are more likely to have children with the same concern)
  • Diminished levels of vasopressin (a hormone that reduces urine production at night)
  • The mechanism for the bladder and brain to talk to each other is “off line”
  • Underlying medical/emotional concerns (i.e. diabetes, urinary tract infection, ADHD, etc)

When does a child achieve dryness at night?

Typically, children will learn to stay dry during the daytime first, then they will achieve night time dryness. This whole process generally can take up age 4-5.

When is bedwetting a concern? 

Typically, when ...

Kids with kidney disease and cold and flu season

With the summer winding down, the dreaded cold and flu season is just around the corner.  Parents with children who have a history of kidney disease need to keep in mind a few things during this season of stuffy noses and coughs.

  • Avoid NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) like ibuprofen, Motrin, Advil, naproxen, and Aleve.
    • NSAIDs are known to decrease blood flow to the kidneys and can cause more damage.
  • Avoid Pseudoephedrine or any medications that may contain similar ingredients.
    • Pseudoephedrine is usually an ingredient for decongestants like Sudafed and is known to increase blood pressure.
  • Say YES to the flu shot early.
    • Children with kidney disease ....
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