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Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Blog Blog

'multiple sclerosis' Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Blog posts

Bike the US for MS riders donate $25,000 to the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center

The Multiple Sclerosis Center at Swedish welcomed 30 cyclists Sunday for the finale of their coast-to-coast ride for multiple sclerosis (MS). Cyclists and a crowd of supporters and loved ones continued the celebration inside where they presented the Swedish MS Center with a $25,000 donation.

The ride was extremely significant for one of the cyclists, Diane Mattens, who is also a patient at the Swedish MS Center. Diane has been living with multiple sclerosis for nearly three decades and is the first woman with MS to complete a Bike the US for MS tour.

Diane credits Dr. James Bowen, who has been her doctor for the past 15 years, saying he "knows me all too well." In addition to raising more than $15,000 for her ride, Diane’s goal is to help change the face of MS and inspire other people living with the disease to keep moving.

“I think just knowing the fact that I can [complete the ride] is pretty motivating in itself,” Diane told KING-5 News. “You can’t waste one day because you never know what’s going to happen tomorrow.”

We are extremely grateful for ...

Can Botox help paraspinal muscle spasticity in multiple sclerosis?

This post is jointly written with Alika Ziker, Swedish Neuroscience Institute research intern.

Botulinum toxin type-A (Botox) is a naturally occurring toxic substance best known for its use in cosmetics.  It is taken from certain bacteria and works by preventing the target muscle from contracting.

Over the last 15 years, several studies have emerged supporting the idea that Botox is also an effective and safe therapy for people who suffer from a loss of muscle control, lower back pain and even migraines. Because multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that attacks the central nervous system, many MS patients suffer from those same conditions, as well as weakness and spasticity.  Depending on the individual, the affected muscles may be ....

Easy make-ahead meals to beat MS fatigue

In my last post about eating well with multiple sclerosis (MS), we discussed meal planning and prep to help enable you to eat nutritiously through the week.

Maybe you’ve decided to carve out some time to make a list and prep some food for the week. Good for you! Need some inspiration?

Here are a few recipes that will produce left overs that hold up well and can be packed up for healthy lunches. Don’t forget to include plenty of extra fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grain cereals and non-fat dairy products to be eaten as breakfast and snacks.

Meal 1: Chilled peanut noodles with grilled chicken breast and steamed broccoli

Click here for the recipe.

The whole-wheat noodles give you a good dose of fiber to help keep you regular and the protein from the peanuts will help you feel full longer than other vegetarian pasta dishes. Cook enough chicken for you and your family to have a 4 oz. portion both for dinner lunch the next day, plus an extra pound for another recipe later in the week.

This noodle dish can be served room temperature right after it is made. It is also great eaten cold the next day. If you are sensitive to heat and don’t want to heat up you kitchen re-heating food then you will love this dish.

Meal 2: Slow-cooker vegetarian chili with a whole grain roll

Click here for the recipe.

This dish is ...

Multiple Sclerosis Cyclists Ride Cross-Country to Swedish

Help us thank and congratulate them Sunday, August 4. Photo from Diane Mattens.

More than 30 bike riders will arrive at the MS Center at Swedish on the afternoon of Sunday, August 4 to celebrate their cross-country bike ride and to make a contribution in support of the Center. We are seeking MS Center patients and friends to help us welcome the riders, including Swedish patient, Diane Mattens, and to thank them for their generous support.

The cyclists will be wrapping up their 4,295 mile bike ride that began...

Do injectable therapies benefit progressive forms of MS?

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) recently published their Top Five Recommendations in the Choosing Wisely Campaign in promoting high value neurological care. This was done in collaboration with the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation and Consumer Reports to reduce ineffective and costly care.

One of the AAN’s recommendations was to stop prescribing interferon-beta and glatiramer acetate to people who have progressive, non-relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS).

The AAN made clear that  the recommendations were intended to promote discussion between patients and their providers about the value of these therapies, not to completely stop the use of specific treatments.

The recommendation to stop prescribing interferon-beta and glatiramer acetate is not unanimously supported by all MS neurologists, many of whom feel that this was an oversimplification.

People with ...

Heat Sensitivity and Multiple Sclerosis: Resources to help cool off MS symptoms

The summer months have arrived and the weather is warming up. While many sun-deprived residents of the Pacific Northwest are enjoying more sunshine, many people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience a temporary worsening of their symptoms when the weather gets warmer.

Air conditioners, fans, and cooling products like vests and neck wraps can help keep the body cool and prevent or reverse the symptoms. But what if you can’t afford it, or think your income is too high to get financial assistance?

Multiple sclerosis MRI technique can spot tissue damage months before an MS attack

A study published in this week’s Neurology found that a relatively new MRI technique could spot changes in the brain up to three months before inflammation causes a multiple sclerosis (MS) attack.

Traditionally, we have viewed MS as a disease where the immune system attacks the brain, causing the abrupt onset of inflammation (measured by gadolinium enhancement). This inflammation causes damage to the brain, which causes symptoms.

The new technique, called susceptibility-weighted imaging, allows researchers to see that tissue damage is happening up to three months prior to the inflammation.

Susceptibility-weighted imaging measures the amount of magnetic susceptibility of tissues aligned in different directions. The amount of alignment in different directions is called the phase image. In tissues like myelin, the magnetic susceptibility lines up with the direction of the myelin because molecules can move alongside the myelin more easily than they can move across it.

When myelin is damaged, the tissue becomes disorganized and magnetic susceptibility changes from aligning primarily in one direction to alignment in many different directions. The phase image can be used to measure the degree of myelin damage.

In this study, 20 patients ...

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