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'Neuroscience Institute' Swedish News Blog posts

Seattle Brain Cancer Walk Raises $530,000 for Brain Cancer Research

Funds will advance the search for new treatment options and improve patient care


SEATTLE — Sept. 26, 2014 — More than 3,000 walkers filled Seattle Center’s Next 50 Plaza on Sept. 20 for the 7th Annual Seattle Brain Cancer Walk. The walk raised more than $530,000, with 100 percent of the funds supporting research at the Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (Ivy Center).
 
“The Seattle Brain Cancer Walk is an opportunity to celebrate the patients and families who are all affected by this devastating disease,” said Charles Cobbs, M.D., medical director of the Ivy Center. “The funds raised will make a direct impact on our research at the Ivy Center, and will help us push toward breakthroughs to better treat, and hopefully cure this disease.”
 
According to the American Brain Tumor Association, brain tumors are the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Americans under the age of 20; the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men ages 20-39; and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women ages 20-39.
 
Prior to the opening of the Ivy Center in 2008, clinical trials for patients with brain tumors were extremely limited in the Pacific Northwest. To date, the Ivy Center has provided access to 15 community-based clinical trials of experimental new therapies for patients diagnosed with brain cancer.

KING 5 HealthLink Profiles Focused Ultrasound Research at Swedish

KING 5 TV’s HealthLink program recently aired a segment on a clinical trial being conducted at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute at its Cherry Hill hospital. The study is examining the use of a novel, noninvasive approach to treating brain disorders using focused ultrasound. The concept is appealing to clinicians, as it could provide patients with a less invasive treatment option.

The KING 5 story examines the technology’s application for the treatment of essential tremor, one of the most common movement disorders. Swedish Neuroscience Institute is also studying focused ultrasound for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and brain tumors.

Watch the KING 5 HealthLink story here.

Swedish Launches Studies Examining Focused Ultrasound as a Potential Treatment for Parkinson’s disease, Brain Tumors

Swedish Neuroscience Institute leads national ultrasound technology research

 
News Release
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                          
 

Contact: Clay Holtzman, Swedish, (206) 998-5028, clay.holtzman@swedish.org

SEATTLE — July 30, 2014 — The Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is expanding its study of focused ultrasound as a novel treatment for brain disorders with the opening of two clinical trials examining the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and brain tumors. The new trials add to the institute’s ongoing study of focused ultrasound for a treatment of essential tremor (ET).
 
“SNI is one of the few locations in the world where focused ultrasound is being studied at this level. These efforts exemplify SNI’s ongoing mission to deliver leading edge treatment for brain and spinal conditions,” said David Newell, M.D., Chief of Neurosciences at SNI. “We are honored to be a pioneer in this field and are eager to produce translational results.”
 
These trials come after SNI launched a study last year examining focused ultrasound’s potential as a treatment for essential tremor, a common neurological disorder resulting in involuntary shaking. The original study was designed to determine viability and safety of ultrasound treatment in improving the quality of life for those affected. Together, these three studies place SNI at the forefront of clinical care providers studying focused ultrasound as a treatment approach.

Swedish Neuroscience Institute Seeks Participants for Trial of an Investigational Technology to Treat Essential Tremor

One of only four sites in U.S. to treat neurological disorder
 

SEATTLE, Sept. 26, 2013 – Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is looking for patients willing to participate in a study of an investigational technology to treat essential tremor, a common neurological disorder, with sound rather than surgery.

An estimated 10 million people in the U.S have essential tremor (ET), which causes a rhythmic shaking or trembling of hands and arms but can also affect the head, legs and other parts of the body. It affects one out of every 25 adults over 40 and can be confused with but is different from better-known Parkinson’s disease, which is actually much less prevalent. ET produces disabilities that hamper basic daily activities and worsens over time, with severely affected patients unable to feed or care for themselves.

Dr. Ryder Gwinn, the Principle Investigator for the study at SNI who has utilized other treatments for patients with essential tremor, said focused ultrasound could be an option for many of these patients. For example, medication has been shown to be ineffective for up to half of all ET patients.

Swedish Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Charles Cobbs

SEATTLE — Aug. 15, 2013 — Swedish, the largest nonprofit healthcare provider in the greater Seattle area, announced today that Dr. Charles S. Cobbs will lead The Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment (Ivy Center) at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute as its new director. The Ivy Center was founded on a mission to combine research science with medical treatments to advance the field of brain cancer and to give new hope to each person diagnosed with the disease.

Dr. Cobbs is a neurosurgeon and internationally recognized expert in brain cancer treatment and research. He was personally selected for this role by Dr. Greg Foltz, the inaugural director and founder of the Ivy Center, who passed away on June 27, 2013 from pancreatic cancer.

Greg Foltz, M.D. – A legacy to remember

SEATTLE, July 3, 2013 – Greg Foltz, M.D., director of the Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (Ivy Center), passed away from Stage IV pancreatic cancer on Thursday, June 27. Dr. Foltz, who was 50 years old, spent the last 20 years as a pioneer and champion for advancing brain cancer research in the hope of one day finding a cure.

Swedish Offers New Treatment for Glioblastoma Brain Tumors

SEATTLE, Feb. 6, 2013 – Swedish Neuroscience Institute has added a new and innovative therapy to its treatment arsenal for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) – a very aggressive and difficult to control brain tumor.

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