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Swedish Launches Studies Examining Focused Ultrasound as a Potential Treatment for Parkinson’s disease, Brain Tumors

Swedish Neuroscience Institute leads national ultrasound technology research

 
News Release
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                          
 

Contact: Clay Holtzman, Swedish, (206) 998-5028, clay.holtzman@swedish.org

SEATTLE — July 30, 2014 — The Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is expanding its study of focused ultrasound as a novel treatment for brain disorders with the opening of two clinical trials examining the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and brain tumors. The new trials add to the institute’s ongoing study of focused ultrasound for a treatment of essential tremor (ET).
 
“SNI is one of the few locations in the world where focused ultrasound is being studied at this level. These efforts exemplify SNI’s ongoing mission to deliver leading edge treatment for brain and spinal conditions,” said David Newell, M.D., Chief of Neurosciences at SNI. “We are honored to be a pioneer in this field and are eager to produce translational results.”
 
These trials come after SNI launched a study last year examining focused ultrasound’s potential as a treatment for essential tremor, a common neurological disorder resulting in involuntary shaking. The original study was designed to determine viability and safety of ultrasound treatment in improving the quality of life for those affected. Together, these three studies place SNI at the forefront of clinical care providers studying focused ultrasound as a treatment approach.

Swedish Neuroscience Institute Seeks Participants for Trial of an Investigational Technology to Treat Essential Tremor

One of only four sites in U.S. to treat neurological disorder
 

SEATTLE, Sept. 26, 2013 – Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is looking for patients willing to participate in a study of an investigational technology to treat essential tremor, a common neurological disorder, with sound rather than surgery.

An estimated 10 million people in the U.S have essential tremor (ET), which causes a rhythmic shaking or trembling of hands and arms but can also affect the head, legs and other parts of the body. It affects one out of every 25 adults over 40 and can be confused with but is different from better-known Parkinson’s disease, which is actually much less prevalent. ET produces disabilities that hamper basic daily activities and worsens over time, with severely affected patients unable to feed or care for themselves.

Dr. Ryder Gwinn, the Principle Investigator for the study at SNI who has utilized other treatments for patients with essential tremor, said focused ultrasound could be an option for many of these patients. For example, medication has been shown to be ineffective for up to half of all ET patients.

Swedish Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Charles Cobbs

SEATTLE — Aug. 15, 2013 — Swedish, the largest nonprofit healthcare provider in the greater Seattle area, announced today that Dr. Charles S. Cobbs will lead The Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment (Ivy Center) at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute as its new director. The Ivy Center was founded on a mission to combine research science with medical treatments to advance the field of brain cancer and to give new hope to each person diagnosed with the disease.

Dr. Cobbs is a neurosurgeon and internationally recognized expert in brain cancer treatment and research. He was personally selected for this role by Dr. Greg Foltz, the inaugural director and founder of the Ivy Center, who passed away on June 27, 2013 from pancreatic cancer.

Greg Foltz, M.D. – A legacy to remember

SEATTLE, July 3, 2013 – Greg Foltz, M.D., director of the Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (Ivy Center), passed away from Stage IV pancreatic cancer on Thursday, June 27. Dr. Foltz, who was 50 years old, spent the last 20 years as a pioneer and champion for advancing brain cancer research in the hope of one day finding a cure.

Swedish Offers New Treatment for Glioblastoma Brain Tumors

SEATTLE, Feb. 6, 2013 – Swedish Neuroscience Institute has added a new and innovative therapy to its treatment arsenal for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) – a very aggressive and difficult to control brain tumor.

Swedish Receives $2.5 Million Grant from the Ivy Foundation to Advance Brain Cancer Research

SEATTLE, Nov. 29, 2012 - Swedish Medical Center announced today that the Ben and Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment (Ivy Center) will receive an additional $2.5 million grant from the Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation (Ivy Foundation). The grant, the second received from the Ivy Foundation in three years, will be used to identify new drugs with potential for clinical use in brain cancer treatment.

Swedish Foundation Raises $100 Million to Help Meet Increasing Demand for Regional Health-Care Services

SEATTLE, Oct. 26, 2012 – Swedish Medical Center's seven-year fund-raising initiative, called The Campaign for Swedish, has raised $103 million, exceeding its initial $100 million fund-raising goal in approximately five-and-a-half years. The Campaign, launched to help improve patient care and treatment options throughout the Swedish system, is the largest fund-raising effort undertaken by the private, non-profit health system to date.

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