Tags
Swedish News Blog Blog

'About Swedish' Swedish News Blog posts

Seattle Brain Cancer Walk Raises $530,000 for Brain Cancer Research

Funds will advance the search for new treatment options and improve patient care


SEATTLE — Sept. 26, 2014 — More than 3,000 walkers filled Seattle Center’s Next 50 Plaza on Sept. 20 for the 7th Annual Seattle Brain Cancer Walk. The walk raised more than $530,000, with 100 percent of the funds supporting research at the Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (Ivy Center).
 
“The Seattle Brain Cancer Walk is an opportunity to celebrate the patients and families who are all affected by this devastating disease,” said Charles Cobbs, M.D., medical director of the Ivy Center. “The funds raised will make a direct impact on our research at the Ivy Center, and will help us push toward breakthroughs to better treat, and hopefully cure this disease.”
 
According to the American Brain Tumor Association, brain tumors are the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Americans under the age of 20; the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men ages 20-39; and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women ages 20-39.
 
Prior to the opening of the Ivy Center in 2008, clinical trials for patients with brain tumors were extremely limited in the Pacific Northwest. To date, the Ivy Center has provided access to 15 community-based clinical trials of experimental new therapies for patients diagnosed with brain cancer.

Internationally Renowned Hepatologist, Researcher Named Director of Swedish Liver Care Network

Kris Kowdley, M.D., also named research director of the Swedish Organ Care Program


SEATTLE — Sept. 25, 2014 —Internationally renowned physician and researcher Kris V. Kowdley, M.D., FACP, FACG, AGAF and AASLD Fellow has joined the Swedish Liver Center’s medical staff as Director of the Swedish Liver Care Network and Research Director of the Organ Care Program. Dr. Kowdley will provide transplant and liver care for patients while continuing his groundbreaking research into Hepatitis C. Dr. Kowdley’s first day at Swedish was Sept. 15.
 
“We are delighted to welcome Dr. Kowdley to the Swedish Liver Center medical staff,” said Marquis Hart, M.D., director of the Swedish Organ Transplant Program. “Dr. Kowdley’s ambitious research is giving hope to patients with serious liver disease and we are excited to extend his care to our patients.”

Prior to Swedish, Dr. Kowdley served as the director of the Liver Center of Excellence and the director of research at the Digestive Disease Institute at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle.

Dr. Kowdley has presented his research on liver diseases at more than 125 national and international medical centers and scientific symposia. He is the author of more than 350 articles, book chapters, reviews and commentaries. He has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), Annals of Internal Medicine and the American Journal of Physiology.
 
Dr. Kowdley is first author of two seminal papers this year in the NEJM of novel therapies with a high rate of cure for chronic hepatitis C. The AVIATOR trial is the first large study of all-oral treatment for hepatitis C. More than 95 percent of AVIATOR study patients achieved a cure with the 3-D and ribavirin regimen. The second study, known as ION-3, showed that a fixed-dose combination tablet of once-daily ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for eight weeks achieved a cure in 94 percent of patients.

Swedish Caregivers Recognized as ‘Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners’

Dozens of Swedish caregivers were recently recognized by Seattle Metropolitan magazine’s annual Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners feature.
 
The 2014 rankings include nearly 50 Swedish caregivers and draws from peer endorsements of more than 1,400 doctors, nurses and physician assistants in the Seattle metropolitan area. Nearly 13,000 nominations were narrowed down by an anonymous advisory panel. The panel’s criteria included such items as years of experience, competency, patient rapport and satisfaction and compliance with care recommendations.
 
Below you will find a list of Swedish providers recognized with this year’s top honor. A complete list of providers can also be found online.

Construction Begins on Biggest Project at Swedish Edmonds in 40 Years

300 Guests Celebrate Hospital’s Half-Century History and Building for the Future


EDMONDS, WA — Sept. 12, 2014 — The mood was festive as about 300 community members celebrated the hospital’s 50th anniversary and groundbreaking milestones at Swedish Edmonds on Wednesday. Shovels plunged into dirt that will be covered one year from now by a two-story, 77,000-square-foot facility to include a new emergency department (ED), urgent care center, observation unit, outpatient diagnostic imaging center, new lobby, front entry, 37,000-square-foot shelled second floor and more.
 
“This is a historic moment for the community we serve at Swedish Edmonds,” said David Jaffe, chief executive at the hospital. “With this new facility, we can meet the growing healthcare needs for decades to come and offer an unmatched patient experience.”
 
The hospital opened in 1964 as a result of voters approving the establishment of Snohomish County Public Hospital District #2 in 1962. Back then, the entire facility and property cost $2 million. The new expansion will cost over $60 million.

KING 5, PSBJ Cover Swedish’s Level IV NICU Designation

KING 5’s Teresa Yuan reports on Swedish’s newly designated Level IV neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), one of only two serving the region. The NICU is located at Swedish’s First Hill hospital in Seattle.

Watch the KING 5 clip here.

Last week Puget Sound Business Journal reporter Greg Lamm covered the new designation.

Read the PSBJ story here.

KOMO 4 Covers Swedish ‘POEM’ Procedure

KOMO 4’s Molly Shen tells viewers about a new procedure being offered at Swedish Medical Center. Per oral endoscopic myotomy (also known as ‘POEM’) is only being offered in Washington State at Swedish.

View the clip on KOMO 4 here.

Olaparib Tablet Safe in Pretreated Ovarian Cancer Patients; More Effective in Those With BRCA Mutations

American Association for Cancer Research News Release


SEATTLE —  Sept. 9, 2014 — An oral tablet form of a PARP inhibitor, olaparib, given in combination with chemotherapy, was safe in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients, and patients with BRCA mutations may have a better response compared with those without a BRCA mutation, according to phase Ib clinical trial data presented at the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research-AACR 10th Biennial Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium, held Sept. 8-9.

“This study is one of the first studies to use olaparib tablets instead of olaparib capsules,” said Saul Rivkin, MD, founder and chairman of the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research, and a research scientist at the Swedish Cancer Institute, both in Seattle, Washington. “The goal was to find the maximum tolerated dose of olaparib tablets plus weekly metronomic carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with relapsed ovarian cancer.

“This treatment regimen provided a response rate of 66 percent in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients. It was surprisingly tolerable with no grade 4 toxicities,” said Rivkin.

“The outlook for ovarian cancer patients with advanced disease is not equivalent to that of breast cancer, and a lot of work needs to be done to improve the cure rate,” Rivkin added. “Medical researchers are discovering and investigating new and innovative therapies for the treatment of ovarian cancer. We are constantly working toward improving the quality of life and survival for all ovarian cancer patients.”

Results 1-7 of 100