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Neuroscience (SNI) Blog

'neuroscience' Neuroscience (SNI) posts

The Spring Issue of BrainWaves Is Now Available

 

The Spring 2011 edition of BrainWaves is now available online.

BrainWaves is the newsletter of the Swedish Neuroscience Institute. Published quarterly, BrainWaves provides information about neurological conditions treated at the Institute, and also profiles the programs, services, and new initiatives of the institute and its staff.

 

Also check out our past editions of the BrainWaves newsletter.

SNI Communication Tools

SNI is leveraging communication tools that deliver information to patients, referring physicians and the public as a crucial part of providing care at the advancing edge of neu­rological knowledge. The goals of these tools are two-fold. One goal is to update established patients and their doctors regarding the latest developments in our programs and centers. The other is to lower the barrier for patients and physicians who are facing a new neuro­logical problem to discover tertiary subspe­cialty care.

A new SNI communication tool

Dan Rizzuto, Ph.D., director of SNI research, and John Henson, M.D., recently launched the SNI blog to complement other commu­nication efforts and to provide a communication outlet for the staff of SNI. The SNI blog offers brief notes about advances in neurological care provided in SNI’s centers, as well as news items about the institute that are of interest to our patients and referring physicians.

Blog content is more dynamic than Web content. Search engines are able to detect targeted key words within each entry, which helps direct highly relevant Web traffic to the blog. This aids in the dissemination of infor­mation to patients and physicians. Viewers also can subscribe to an e-mail notification system that will alert them to newly posted material.

Other SNI communication tools

Advances in thrombolysis

 Washington State has one of the high est stroke mortality rates in the nation. To improve this situation, acute intervention al therapies for stroke are being employed to restore circulation to ischemic brain tissue that surrounds areas of completed infraction, while avoiding risk of hemor rhage due to reperfusion of large areas of infracted brain tissue.

Urgent thrombolysis with intrave nous alteplase is the only therapy known to improve clinical outcomes following acute stroke. Unfortunately, alteplase has had limited usage because many patients arrive in an emergency department after the three-hour treatment window. The FDA has also approved two clot removal devices based on the ability to restore circulation. These devices are used up to eight hours after symptom onset. Several approaches to improved acute stroke care are now under way, including extension of the thrombolysis window to 4.5 hours, identification of safer thrombolytic agents and research identifying brain at risk of in farction following a stroke.

A recent European study demonstrat ed the efficacy of alteplase up to 4.5 hours after ischemic stroke in patients younger than age 80 years who have neither dia betes mellitus or prior stroke. The safety profile during this longer window for these patients appears similar to that at three hours.

Another promising advance employs a new thrombolytic agent called des moteplase.

Detecting cerebral microemboli with transcranial doppler

Since its introduction in 1982, transcranial doppler ultrasound (TCD) has evolved into a por­table, multimodality, noninvasive method for real-time imaging of intracranial vasculature.

The detection of cerebral microemboli is among the more remarkable capabilities of TCD. Emboli create countable signals in the ultrasound display due to the higher reflection of sound waves compared to the blood cells. Experimental mod­els have shown a high sensitivity and specificity for detection of a variety of substrates, including thrombotic, platelet and atheromatous emboli.

Microembolic signals (MES) within the in­tracranial vasculature are most frequently identi­fied in patients with large-vessel atherosclerotic disease, such as carotid stenosis. They have also been reported in intracranial arterial stenosis, ar­terial dissection, cardiac disease and atheroaortic plaque. Additionally, they have been seen in arter­ies distal to coiled aneurysms.

There is strong evidence that MES detection predicts future ipsilateral stroke risk in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (Markus HS, et al.; King A, et al.). A recent study of patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis demonstrated that MES predicted subsequent ipsilateral stroke and TIA, and also ipsilateral stroke alone, and that it is helpful in selecting patients who will benefit from carotid endarterectomy (Markus, HS et al.).

Identification of active embolization provides crucial patho­physiological information to the neurologist and can also aid in the selection of tailored therapy aimed at reducing the risk of stroke. Emboli from different sources have unique compositions and re­quire specific therapy, such as antiplatelet agents for emboli from large artery atherosclerotic plaque and anticoagulants for cardiac emboli.

Future advances in TCD technology will permit full automa­tion and better identification of the composition and size of circu­lating embolic materials, thus improving its value for patients with cerebrovascular disease.

Contact Colleen Douville, RVT, at colleen.douville@swedish.org or 206-320-4080, for more information about TCD for detec­tion of cerebral microemboli.

Pediatric Neuroscience Center receives “Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) Clinic” Designation

The Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance announced today that it has designated the Swedish Pediatric Neuroscience Center (SPNC) at SNI as a TSC Clinic. Marcio Sotero, MD, medical director of SPNC, is the director of the new center. This designation is an important step forward in the regional delivery of care to patients with tuberous sclerosis, as the TSC Clinics closest to Seattle are located at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix and Children’s Hospital in Oakland, CA.

TSC is a genetic disorder that causes tumors to form in many different organs, primarily in the brain, eyes, heart, kidney, skin and lungs. Seizures are a very common manifestation, and some people with TSC experience developmental delay, mental retardation and autism.

SNI Grand Round Series 2011 - Epilepsy Genetics

Thursday, February 3, 2011
7:30am - 8:30am
Swedish Education Conference Center, Room B

 

Marcio Sotero de Menezes, MD, Pediatric Epilepsy, Pediatric Neurology, Swedish Neuroscience Institute

 

 

 

Objectives:

At the conclusion of this session, attendees will have an increased ability to:

  • Identify genetic epilepsy syndromes
  • Explain treatment of genetic epilepsy syndromes

SNI Grand Round Series is every 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month.

Winter Issue of BrainWaves Now Available

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Winter 2010 edition of BrainWaves is now available online.

BrainWaves is the newsletter of the Swedish Neuroscience Institute. Published quarterly, BrainWaves provides information about neurological conditions treated at the Institute, and also profiles the programs, services, and new initiatives of the institute and its staff.

 

Also check out our past editions of the BrainWaves newsletter.

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