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Neuroscience (SNI) Blog

'MS' Neuroscience (SNI) posts

Swedish Contributes to New Treatment Option for Multiple Sclerosis

 On September 12, 2012, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved teriflunomide for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Teriflunomide (AUBAGIO) is a once-daily pill for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS. Led by Dr. Lily Jung Henson, the Swedish Neuroscience Institute was among several clinical sites that tested the drug. Results of the research showed that teriflunomide can lessen MS disease activity. Specifically, it behaves similarly to injectable therapies by slowing MS relapse frequency, the rate of disability and MRI activity.

The safety profile, however, is more challenging than ....

Multiple Sclerosis Center Continues to Grow

The Multiple Sclerosis Center continues to grow. We have added an additional MS nurse, Reiko Aramaki, RN. Reiko joined us from the Evergreen MS Center. She is certified by the International Order of MS Nurses and will expand our ability to respond to patient’s needs.

Outreach programs also continue. Dr. Bowen was recently interviewed by Kathi Goertzen from KOMO TV4 regarding CCSVI. This interview can be seen at http://www.komonews.com/home/video/106166123.html.

Also, Chaz Gilbert, a patient care coordinator won the Seattle Verizon Urban Challenge on 10/30/10, racing through 12 checkpoints in their city using only clues, their feet and public transit.

Exciting Advances in Multiple Sclerosis from ECTRIMS

There is exciting news from last week’s 26th Congress of the European Committee for the Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) in Gothenburg, Sweden.

ALEMTUZUMAB. 5-year data from a Phase II extension study for alemtuzumab, an intravenously administered monoclonal antibody, showed that the drug:

  • reduced annualized rate of relapse to 0.14 compared with 0.28 for interferon
  • reduced the risk for sustained accumulation of disability in remitting relapsing multiple sclerosis by 87% compared to 62% with interferon.

This is a remarkable agent with excellent activity in MS. Adverse events included immune thrombocytopenic purpura, thyroiditis and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease.

TERIFLUNOMIDE. A Phase III trial of oral teriflunomide in remitting relapsing MS showed:

  • a 31% reduction in relapse rate and increased time to first relapse compared with placebo
  • reduced the risk of sustained disability progression by 29.8%.

Side effects were mild and included diarrhea, nausea, liver function abnormalities and hair loss.

Alemtuzumab and teriflunomide are currently in Phase III clinical trials at SNI.

SNI PRESENTATIONS:

  • Dr. Jim Bowen presented a poster about ongoing demyelination and neurodegeneration in a patient who had undergone autologous stem cell transplantation.
  • Drs. Jung Henson and Mayadev reviewed the beneficial effects of exercise on functional and quality of life outcomes from SNI’s MS wellness program
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