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'Pediatric Specialty Care' Parentelligence posts

Lymph nodes in children

One of the most common referrals to my pediatric surgery practice is (in the parents’ words) “to check out this lump and make sure it’s nothing to worry about.”  Lymph nodes are part of the less publicized part of the circulatory system: the lymphatics.  Lymphatics play a key role in our body’s immune system, and lymph nodes grow in response to an infection in the “neighborhood” to produce cells necessary to hopefully resolve the infection. 

About half of all children will develop enlarged lymph nodes (cervical lymphadenitis) in the neck for example, and the vast majority of these are in response to a minor infection in the area (sore throat, sinus infection, ear infection, etc.).  Often the infection is quite subtle and might not be identified.  These nodes typically go through a pattern of growing and then receding in size once the infection resolves.  This process can take several weeks to months.  The nodes may become tender, warm, and there may be some redness of the overlying skin.  Your child might complain of pain in the area, be fussier, have fever, and/or have decreased appetite.  If the node itself becomes infected, it can turn into an abscess and would require antibiotics and a drainage procedure.  Any possibly infected lymph node should be evaluated by your doctor.
 
Some enlarged lymph nodes ...

When do kids need antibiotics?

Winter can seem like one long continuous “sick day” for families - kids pick up frequent infections at school or daycare and pass them around to everyone at home.  Often it feels like by the time the illness has worked its way through the household, a new one has started!  Even for physicians, it can sometimes be difficult to distinguish between viral and bacterial infections.  Since antibiotics cannot treat viruses, they are often over-prescribed - which can lead to significant side effects in children and also contributes bacteria becoming resistant to existing medications.  In November 2013, the American Academy of Pediatrics released an updated guidance regarding antibiotic treatment, helping answer the frequently asked question about when kids need antibiotics.

Here's what you should know about antibiotics in these situations:

  • Ear infections ...

Tips for keeping young athletes safe and healthy

We all know exercise is an important factor in maintaining an active and healthy life. However, over-exercising can lead to a rare, but serious complication known as rhabdomyolysis – a medical team that literally means ‘dissolution or destruction of skeletal muscle’. There has been a recent increase in rhabdomyolysis amongst teen athletes so it is important to recognize the warning signs and learn how to prevent them.

The classic triad of rhabdomyolysis is dark urine, muscle weakness or fatigue, and muscle pain. Although exercise can be the primary factor, other key contributing elements such as dehydration, genetic conditions (e.g. sickle cell), metabolic disorders, nutritional supplements, drug use, and heat stress can exacerbate muscle damage. Without appropriate medical evaluation and care, rhabdomyolysis can cause permanent damage to the kidneys and may even be life-threatening in severe cases. Here are some tips to help your young athlete remain active and healthy:

  1. Maintain adequate hydration – preferably with plain water.  Sports and energy drinks may often contain caffeine and excessive amounts of sugar which can cause dehydration.  On average, children that are 6-10 years old should have about 1L of fluid a day, children 10-14 years old should have 1.5L/day and teens over 14 years should have at least 2L of fluid a day. It is important to increase fluids with increased activity due to the additional fluid losses that occur.
  2. Eliminate protein supplements. A recent study by the American Academy of Pediatrics found ...

Infants with Milk Allergy

A 4 week-old infant and his mother came to my office last week.  The mother had started seeing small flecks of blood and stringy mucous in the infant’s diapers a week prior.  The baby was fine in every other way, breast feeding normally, and looked quite healthy when I examined him.

I diagnosed the infant as having cow’s milk protein-induced proctocolitis, the term referring to allergic inflammation of the lower gastrointestinal tract from exposure to cow’s milk. 

This is a diagnosis I make often. Here's what you should know about infants with milk allergies:

  1. It’s more common than you think. 2-3% of infants in the U.S. are allergic to cow’s milk protein. It is even more common in infants with eczema or who have parents or siblings with allergies.
  2. It’s seen in breast fed babies.  Over 50% of infants with this condition are breast milk-fed infants.  But remember, the babies are allergic to the dairy in their moms’ diets, not to their mothers’ breast milk per se!
  3. Switching to soy or goat’s milk doesn’t work.  Over two-thirds of infants with cow’s milk protein allergy “cross-react” to soy protein (which means that they may not be truly allergic to soy protein, but their immune systems are just too “immature” to know the difference between the two).  Similarly, if a mother switches from drinking cow’s milk to goat’s milk, it won’t help, because the source is still a “different species”; the infant’s immune system will still respond to the “foreign” protein.
  4. Treatment takes time. The inflammation resolves when all traces of cow’s milk (and soy), are  removed from the infant’s diet.  In the case of formula-fed infants, we switch to special hypoallergenic formulas.  Typically after a successful switch, the bleeding stops within a week.  However, with breast fed infants, the improvement can be a little slower.  Since it can take up to 2 weeks for the dairy in a mother’s diet to circulate into her breast milk, the full effects may not been seen for up to a couple weeks.
  5. Allergy testing is not recommended.  The type of allergy that ...

Infant and Child Development is not about ‘stuff’

When we are bombarded by information and products, how are we as new parents supposed to decipher what is in the best interest of our child when it comes to their development? 

Parents can quickly become bombarded with information about everything they need to do to optimize the first months of their child’s very impressionable life. A new, overwhelmed, sleep deprived parent can find everything from music for math skills, swaddling positioners for longer sleep, bottles for better speech development, and even multiple equipment options to speed up a child’s progression for walking.  Today there are so many items available for purchase that if a person wanted to, they could  go through an entire day never having to hold, cuddle, snuggle, whisper, sing, gaze, laugh, or touch their baby…..and that is exactly the point.  When it comes right down to it, the best things that we can provide for our babies development has nothing to do with the “stuff”!

Here’s what advertisements for most baby products don’t tell you:

4th Annual Holidays at the Hospital at Swedish

We hope you can join us for a winter wonderland celebration for Swedish Pediatric patients, families, & friends!

This is a free, fun, and festive holiday celebration for the community that will feature:

  • Carolers
  • Photos with Santa
  • Teddy Bear Clinic
  • Cookie decorating
  • Holiday activities and crafts tables
  • Plus, we’ll have a super special guest from the Seattle Sounders, Roger Levesque!

We’ll also be collecting toys for children up to age 18 as well as donations for art supplies and games. Donated items will be given to children at the hospital receiving care and treatment.

Where:
Swedish First Hill
1101 Madison, Medical Tower Lobby
Seattle, WA 98122
**Free parking is available on the street or in the Marion and Minor parking garage

When:
 

Healthy tips for parents and kids to help prevent the spread of colds and the flu

Summer has ended, the kids are back in school, and fall is officially here. Which means….cold and flu season is upon us! Hospitals are already seeing documented cases of seasonal influenza. There are no known cures for colds and flu, so cold and flu prevention should be your goal.

Why do we care about preventing influenza? The flu can be very dangerous for children, causing illness, hospital stays and death each year. The CDC (Center for Disease Control) reports about 20,000 children below the age of 5 are hospitalized from flu complications each year.

The most effective way for preventing the flu is to get the flu shot. It works better than anything else. (Flu vaccination is recommended for all children aged 6 months and older). There are additional strategies you can employ to help ward off those nasty viruses.

Here are 6 tips you can use to help prevent colds and the flu:

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