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What you need to know about Enterovirus D68

Recently, there has been a lot of discussion in the media about a severe type of respiratory illness affecting many children, mainly in the Midwest.  The respiratory illness, caused by an infection with Enterovirus D68, is scary to parents, because it’s hard to differentiate whether their child is ill from this particular virus or just has one of the many other viruses that cause cold- and flu-like symptoms around this time of year.
 
Sometimes media reports leave families with more questions than answers, which is why Dr. Dianne Glover, one of Swedish’s pediatric infectious disease specialists, wanted to share this information with you:

  • Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an unusual form of an otherwise common group of viruses referred to as Enteroviruses.  These are hardy viruses that usually spread by the respiratory route, but can also spread by fecal-oral route.  It is even possible to become infected by touching a surface contaminated with these viruses.

  • EV-D68 causes a respiratory illness which can quickly progress from a child behaving like they have a simple runny nose and mild cough to then having serious difficulty breathing.  Children ....

Newborn screening testing in Washington

For most parents, the newborn period is a time of profound joy, incredible challenges, and LOTS of questions.  As pediatricians, some of the questions we are frequently asked are related to a simple blood test done on all infants in Washington State.  Commonly referred to as the “newborn screen” or “NBS”, “PKU”, or “newborn metabolic testing”, this test checks for several congenital disorders that are rare but can be life-threatening. 

Often parents want to know:

  • What does the test involve? The newborn screen is done by pricking the heel of the infant at around 24 hours of age, then collecting a few drops of blood onto a piece of test paper.  This is dried and then sent to the state lab, where the testing is performed.  Because some of the conditions may take several days to show up, the test is repeated at 7-14 days old (usually by your primary care doctor; it can also be done in the hospital if the baby is still there for any reason).

  • Does it hurt? The needle prick is performed by trained nurses and is done quickly.  It may feel similar to pricking your finger to test blood sugar.  And you can significantly decrease the discomfort of the quick poke by breastfeeding your baby during or immediately after the test!

  • Why do we need this? The diseases we check for are typically rare, but if undiagnosed and untreated can cause a variety of complications, including blindness, poor growth, brain damage, and even death.  The reason that testing every baby is essential is that babies with these conditions can look and act perfectly healthy even while the disease is damaging their bodies, until they get so sick they need to be hospitalized or have permanent damage.  Starting treatment as early as possible can prevent many of the complications.

  • What are you testing for? The ...

Preparing your teen for college and taking care of their health

College is a huge and exciting step in an adolescent’s development. Being prepared can help your teen stay healthy and know where to go when they’re not. Whether your child is staying close to home, or going across the country for school, here are a few tips to add to your college checklist:

Schedule a visit with your primary care physician. (See a list of local Swedish physicians who can see your teen here.)

  • Physicians can make sure your teen is up to date on immunizations that many colleges require. Teens commonly need influenza, Tdap, HPV, and meningococcal vaccines.

  • Ensure that your child has prescriptions (with refills) for all medications they routinely use. Even “as needed” medicines may become needed in college. These medicines should be kept in a locked box in your teen’s room, as many medications can be stolen or used illicitly.

  • Your teen should ...

How to treat babies with forceful vomiting (pyloric stenosis)

Pyloric Stenosis (or infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis) is a condition characterized by forceful vomiting in an infant due to hypertrophy of the pylorus muscle leading to gastric outlet obstruction. This means the muscle where the stomach empties into the small intestine becomes too thick and prevents emptying. As a result, after eating, the baby vomits. The reason for this happening is not known but is likely caused by many things and family history can play a role. Pyloric stenosis is rare, occurring in about 3 of  every 1,000 live births, and most often occurs between the ages of 3-6 weeks, is more common in males, and 1/3 of the time occurs in a first-born child.
 
Vomit from pyloric stenosis usually consists of just milk or formula. Any vomit with color should raise suspicion for other diagnoses. Parents report vomiting from pyloric stenosis as forceful and projectile. Infants are often hungry after vomiting, wanting to continue eating, however eating usually continues the cycle of vomiting.
 
How to treat pyloric stenosis
 
To ...

Don’t Leave Your Child in a Hot Car – Understanding the Risks & Consequences

In the span of this hot weather streak, we all need a quick refresher and reminder about how quickly children can suffer from heatstroke if left in a hot car.  Every summer, there are multiple occasions where children are left in hot cars for a myriad of “excuses” by adults.  In 2014 alone there have been 18 deaths of children related to heatstroke obtained by being left alone in a hot car. 

Here are some things you must know:

  1.  No matter how brief – there are no exceptions!  Some adults may think that taking the child in/out of their car seat is cumbersome and they are correct, even if it for what they believe is a “quick stop”.  But, remember – the stakes are too high!  The car temperatures can get very hot in a very short period of time.  There is no safe amount of time to leave children alone in a car.

(Did you know? In 10 minutes a car can heat up 20+ degrees Fahrenheit.  Even if it is only 60 degrees outside, the inside of a car can heat up to approximately 110 degrees. “Cracking” the windows does very little to keep the car cool.)

How to prevent food poisoning

Many of us are aware of the recent nationwide recall of peaches and other fruit due to the potential of bacterial contamination.  Although thankfully, no illnesses have been reported so far, I’d like to take this opportunity to refresh our knowledge about ways to avoid food borne illness or food poisoning.

 
According to The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), food poisoning affects approximately 1 in 6 Americans every year. Often it results in relatively mild symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea and vomiting that resolve within a day or so. However, food poisoning can also lead to more dangerous and even deadly outcomes, which is why food safety is so important! 
 
So how should we protect our family from food borne illness?   It’s pretty easy!  Just remember 4 basic steps:  clean, separate, cook and chill!

Talking to kids about traumatic world events

From Hurricane Sandy, shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Boston Marathon bombing, the Oso mudslide and most recently the shooting at Seattle Pacific University, so often now we are given immediate access and awareness to traumatic and sudden events happening around the world and right in our own communities.  As parents we play an essential role in helping our children cope with stress and the emotions that come with a traumatic event.  Sometimes we think it would be better for them not to know about these things or that talking about will make it worse, but it’s important to respect their reactions and provide a place for them to talk about it. 

Why is it important to talk with my child? 

Talking to your child is an important first step in helping them understand and process any life event and especially a large scale traumatic event.  Your child may have already heard about the event through school, social media, friends or other sources.  Taking the initiative to talk with them allows you the opportunity to clarify the facts, answer questions and provides them a chance to share their own feelings. 

What should I tell my child?

Knowing ...
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