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What to do if your child swallows something

With the holiday season fast approaching, the environments around us are about to change. Glitter, lights, tinsel, ornaments, decorations, new toys and many other exciting trimmings are bound to be a part of daily life for a while. It’s no doubt that kiddos will be curious about all of this new shiny stuff!

Many kids will likely explore these things with their mouths. Exploring the world by mouth is a normal part of development for babies, but what should you do if your baby or child swallows an object? The answer: stay calm and think! There are some situations in which your child will require the help of a doctor, however many situations can be managed from home. Many items are small enough to pass through the digestive tract and out in a bowel movement, and in this instance your child will likely have no symptoms.

Here are the red flags to look for if your child swallows a foreign object. If your child exhibits any of these symptoms, seek medical help.

New recommendations for children’s screen time and media usage

Screen time is a hot topic for parents, especially in our tech-savvy part of the world. In 2001 the American Academy of Pediatrics addressed the subject of screen time and recommended no more than 2 hours of screen time per day and none for children under 2 years of age . The world has changed considerably since 2001 and screens are more prevalent than ever. Recent surveys suggest that the average child in the US actually spends about 5 hours per day in front of a screen. Recent data (2013) suggest that the average 8 year old spends up to 8 hours per day in front of a screen. Some teens spend up to 11 hours per day in front of a screen. This is not a surprise since 75% of teens have their own phones and most teens text. The average teen sends 3,364 texts per month.

The changing world of media has prompted new recommendations with the hope of fostering a healthy approach to media. New ...

How to deal with temper tantrums in toddlers

We’ve all been there during that screaming fit in the grocery store because your 2 year old just HAS to have that particular treat off the shelf, and when we say no….it (a temper tantrum) all begins.

Why do toddlers tantrum?

A tantrum is the expression of a young child's frustration with the challenges of the moment and their inability to manage that frustration in any other constructive way. This is part of the normal development of children. For some toddlers, tantrums happen when they can’t figure out a particular task; for others they just can’t find the words to express his or her thoughts or feelings. Whatever the challenge, frustration with the situation might trigger anger — resulting in a temper tantrum. Since tantrums are an expression of powerlessness, toddlers who feel some control over their lives may have many fewer tantrums. Remember, if your child is thirsty, hungry or tired, his or her threshold for frustration is likely to be lower — and a tantrum is more likely.

Can I prevent tantrums?
  • Toddlers  ...

Using technology to help educate, prepare, and distract kids in the hospital

The hospital can be a scary place for any patient, and even more so for children. iPads have been around for nearly four years and in that time they have expanded the way children are educated, prepared, distracted, and provided normalization in the pediatric areas of the hospital.

Educating kids

An iPad allows staff to teach patients about a new diagnosis while making it fun and interactive. An iPad provides a visual and hands on way to teach about a diagnosis and also make sure the patient understands their diagnosis. There are many apps designed by healthcare professionals for diagnosis education with kids. Some of these applications include: “Medikidz explains Type One Diabetes”, “Blast Those Blasts” (for children with cancer, specifically leukemia), “Flow Breather” (for children with cystic fibrosis) and “Wellapets- Asthma Education Pets for Kids.”

Helping kids prepare for a procedure or experience

Most pediatric patients ...

Safety tips for the 4th of July

How often do we hear it on the news, local billboards, or social media to “have a safe 4th of July”? Indeed, July 4th can be one of great celebration for our nation’s independence. But do you want to spend the evening in your local Emergency Department or Urgent Care with your child instead of enjoying it with family and friends?

Fireworks are a big cause of injuries, not only to children, but to adults alike. We collectively spend thousands of dollars on things that make the loudest “BOOM”, the brightest lights in the sky, or provide the longest show. We don’t anticipate spending additional money, hundreds to thousands of dollars, on emergency care that comes from the accidents caused by fireworks.

Here are some tips to help you have a safe 4th of July celebration:

How to prepare your child for a stay at the hospital

We all know that Swedish provides top-notch pediatric services for the emergent needs of children and their families.  You may be surprised to find out that many children come to Swedish for a planned inpatient stay as well.  There can be various reasons why a child and their family might be anticipating a hospital stay.  Some examples may include having a surgical procedure that requires them to be monitored for a set period of time afterward, neurological video monitoring, or medical preparations for a procedure the following day.

Regardless of what service your child will be receiving at the hospital, there are ways in which you can better prepare them and yourself for what to expect during your stay.

At Swedish, Child Life Specialists help children and families cope with the hospital process.  Child Life Specialists are available to help educate and prepare children and families prior to surgery and/or an inpatient stay.  Some tips on how to prepare your child for an inpatient stay include .....

Spiders and Bees and Bugs, Oh My! Treating insect bites and stings

Another beautiful Seattle summer is just around the corner.  As we stare out windows and wait for our long days of sunshine to begin, know this – the bugs are doing the same thing!  Any day now all our biting, stinging, and pinching friends will begin to appear.  Make sure you prevent bites with insect repellants.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends using repellants containing 30% or less of DEET for all children older than 2 months of age.  But if a bite happens, arm yourself (and your medicine cabinet) with a treatment plan to get your kids back outside ASAP.
 
Treatment for ...
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