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'Pediatric Endocrinology' Parentelligence posts

Helping kids heal with music and technology

A young girl is cowering in the corner - it is the first day her care-taker has left her side. She has backed herself into a corner as far from anyone as possible. She appears to be filled with anxiety. Staff members and nurses try calming her, but nothing seems to work.

With her back turned, the little girl doesn’t notice a young man entering the room. He is holding a tool, one of which the full power and potential is still unknown to most. Even though he has witnessed its abilities before, what happens next still takes even him by surprise.

Not knowing what to say, he says nothing at all. He lifts his instrument and strikes the first chord. The girl stops. He continues to play. The girl turns and slides to the floor. The young man sinks to his knees, the same level as the girl. Strumming his ukulele the young man begins to sing. The little girl begins to scoot herself across the floor, 20 feet to where the young man kneels, closer and closer until her knees touch his.

There are gasps coming from the doorway, as a handful of hospital staff and nurses witness to an amazing transformation. In a flip of a switch, the little girl went from utter anxiety to calm and happy, soothed by the sound of music. As the young man finishes his song, the little girl smiles, reaches out her hand to touch his, then falls back, smiling and laughing.


This is the story of Melodic Caring Project Founder, Levi Ware, on his most recent visit to provide live music to pediatric patients at Swedish First Hill.

“I've been playing music for a long time and I've seen a lot of amazing things happen when music is introduced into certain situations. What happened on the Pediatric Unit at Swedish was one of the most wonderful, beautiful and undeniably powerful music experiences I've had.  ...

Worrying about your child's growth

The above letters reflect many of our children’s feelings when they are first seen by Dr. Kletter. They and their families arrive to the Pediatric Endocrinology clinic with hope that something can be done.

Children are usually followed by their pediatrician or primary care provider. The following questions are guidelines for parents who are worried about their child’s growth. While any “yes” to the questions may not indicate a problem, it warrants a discussion with your child’s healthcare provider.

  • Is my child the shortest or tallest in the class?
  • Is my child unable to keep up with children of the same age in play?
  • Is my child growing less than 2 inches or more than 3 inches a year?
  • Is my child showing signs of early sexual development (before age 7 in girls and before age 9 in boys)?
  • Has my 13 year old girl or 15 year old boy failed to show signs of sexual development?

An experienced pediatric endocrinologist will evaluate the following possible causes of short stature and growth failure:

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