September 2012
Blog

September 2012 posts

Hernias: why are some watched while others are repaired?

The most common thing that I see as a pediatric surgeon is a child with a lump that is thought to be a hernia. A hernia is a bulging of tissue through an opening in the muscle layers that isn’t normally present. In children, these openings are usually the result of a developmental process that just didn’t quite reach completion. Some hernias need surgery emergently, while others are observed for years with the expectation that they will close on their own.

Here are some pointers to help understand this wide range of approaches to hernias:

Location is very important in considering how aggressive to be with hernias. Belly button (umbilical) hernias are...

Taking Control of Your Brain Health: Class is Sept. 29 at Swedish/Issaquah

First you can’t remember where you left your keys. Then an acquaintance’s name just won’t come to you.

Is it just old age or is it a memory disorder? Sometimes it’s hard to tell and not knowing can be equally as frustrating as forgetfulness itself.

The best way to head off memory loss and to figure out if that is in fact what you’re experiencing is to talk with your doctor and discuss your concerns. Of course, it’s not always easy or convenient to get to the doctor. Dr. Lily Jung-Henson, of the Swedish Neuroscience Institute, holds free community classes that cover these issues and allow you the chance to get some of your questions answered.

Partnering with Dr. Arpan Waghray, Medical Director for Behavioral Health at Swedish, and other members of the Swedish Rehab Services team in Issaquah, Dr. Jung-Henson will be holding a class called “Taking Control of Your Brain Health” on Saturday, September 29.

This free class will be held at the Swedish/Issaquah hospital in the Highlands from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and will help you answer questions such as:

Free Class on Understanding Gastroesophageal Reflux at Swedish/Issaquah on Sept. 26

ISSAQUAH, WASH., Sept. 13, 2012 – On Wednesday, Sept. 26 from 6-7:30 p.m. at Swedish/Issaquah (751 NE Blakely Drive, Issaquah) a free community health education program will be given by two experts in esophageal conditions. The 90-minute class will examine causes of heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), as well as offer practical steps for personal management and treatment.

Washington Healthcare News Publishes Article on Swedish's Three Chiefs of Staff - All Female Physician Leaders

SEATTLE, Sept. 13, 2012 - In light of how unique it is that Swedish's three chiefs of staff - Drs. Mary Weiss (First Hill, Cherry Hill and Ballard campuses), Michelle Sinnett (Edmonds campus), and Lily Jung Henson (Issaquah campus) - are all women, Washington Healthcare News recently published a related article titled 'Swedish Shatters any Vestige of a Glass Ceiling' by Swedish's Chief Medical Officer John Vassall, M.D.

Do self breast exams matter?

Self breast exams: to do or not to do?

Remember when there were monthly emails you could sign up for to remind you and your friends to do your self breast exams at home? Remember seeing the news anchors talking about their monthly self breast exams in an attempt to remind you to do your breast “due diligence?” What happened to self breast exams and are they still important?

Initially, self breast exams were recommended as a screening tool to help early detection of breast cancer. Unfortunately long-term studies have not confirmed that they actually live up to their hype. Two large studies looking at over 200,000 women in both Russia and China didn’t show any difference in breast cancer mortality after 15 years between the women who were performing routine self exams and those who were not. In fact, the women that were practicing self exams found more lumps and underwent more biopsies for benign reasons. Reviews of several other studies failed to show a benefit of regular breast self-examinations including no benefit of early diagnosis, or reductions in deaths or stage at diagnosis. Hence in 2009, the US Preventative Services Task Force advised that clinicians no longer recommend routine self breast examination as a screening tool for breast cancer detection.

Even though you don’t need to be doing a monthly self exam, you should...

Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute Begins Offering a New, Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement Procedure

SEATTLE, Sept. 11, 2012 - For patients too sick to undergo open-heart surgery, a new, FDA-approved, minimally invasive aortic valve replacement procedure - now being performed by Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute (SHVI) providers - is offering new hope to patients whose life-threatening heart condition was previously inoperable.

Testosterone therapy

Testosterone is a naturally occurring hormone and when it falls to levels below normal the health consequences can impact our quality of life as well as our life expectancy.

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