November 2013
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November 2013 posts

What causes constipation and how is it treated?

People often fear the worst about constipation.  Constipation is very common and only rarely signifies something serious.  Just because the average person has a bowel movement daily doesn’t mean you have to—if normal for you is every 3, 5, or 7 days that is okay so long as it’s not adversely affecting your life. In many cases, people with constipation struggle with it all their lives and are looking to be certain nothing more serious is going on and for a way to treat their symptoms.  Even in people with relatively new onset of constipation, there usually is a simple solution.  It is certainly reasonable to have your constipation assessed but in the absence of other warning signs for more serious disease, additional testing related to constipation is not always essential.

What are the causes of constipation?

Colonic inertia

  • Most cases of constipation are caused by colonic inertia, which is simply a slow moving colon.  Different people are made differently, and the muscles and nerves that are supposed to act in concert to push stool along just work a little slower in people with constipation.  In such cases, if we could look at the colon under the microscope it would look normal but if we took an x-ray of how quickly it pushed stool through, it would on average move things along more slowly.

Pelvic floor dysfunction

  • If ...

What should I do about a thyroid nodule?

Thyroid nodules are extremely common and studies have shown that about half of us have at least one!

Fortunately, most of these nodules do not pose any health risks. Not all thyroid nodules are benign, however, and in a minority of cases (about 5-15%) may contain a cancer.  The challenge, of course, is figuring out which nodules are cause for concern and which ones are not.

With increased use of high-resolution imaging, more nodules are being identified today than ever before.  It is also not uncommon for someone to learn they have a nodule “incidentally” after a CT scan, MRI or ultrasound that was performed for some other medical reason.

If you think you may have a thyroid nodule, or if one has been found incidentally by medical imaging, you should make an appointment to see your doctor. Your doctor will likely take several steps, including:

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