November 2011
Blog

November 2011 posts

Swedish/Issaquah Fully Open

The Eastside community has a new, full-service hospital with the complete opening of the 550,000 square-foot campus at Swedish/Issaquah on Tuesday, Nov. 1. The final phase of construction is complete, and hospital staff and patients now have full access to this revolutionary new facility. From the five-story medical office building and the cancer center to the visitor-friendly environs of Café 1910 and the retail stores, the public will encounter an entirely new hospital experience.

There is no better way to celebrate opening a new hospital than by welcoming a new baby into the world. The newest and youngest patient of Swedish/Issaquah, 8-pound, 20-inch-long Liliana Yozelin, was born at 7:23 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 2, one day after Swedish/Issaquah officially opened its doors for inpatients. Liliana is the second child born to Zulma Gutierrez-Tiznado and Francisco Javier Rodriguez of Issaquah.

What opened on Nov. 1?

  • Inpatient Surgery

  • Childbirth Center

  • Pediatric Inpatient Unit
  • Medical/Surgical Inpatient Unit
  • Intensive Care Unit

Interested in having your baby at Swedish/Issaquah?

Browse through provider bios and find one that’s right for you here. You can also register to attend one of our free OB Speed Dating events where you can meet with several OBs one-on-one within an hour. Learn more and register to attend here.

Need to find a provider?

Whether you need primary care or more specialized services, below are providers to care for you and your entire family. We're excited to bring these providers to the Swedish/Issaquah campus. Click here to see a list of providers at Swedish/Issaquah.

My baby has a cold: What can I do at home and when should my baby be seen by the doctor?

This is a question that parents typically ask during this time of the year. Common cold or upper respiratory infections are common in children during the first few years of their life. Some children may have about 8-10 colds by the time they are two, and may experience many more if they are in daycare or if they have older siblings attending school.

Children generally show symptoms that differ from that of adults. Usually, parents notice that their child has runny nose, cough, sneezing and nasal stuffiness. The nasal discharge is clear at first, but may become yellowish-green in color. A low grade fever may also be present the first few days. These symptoms usually last for about 10 days and then improve. However, complications sometimes occur, including bronchiolitis, croup, ear infections, sinusitis and pneumonia.

Unfortunately, there are no medications that can cure the common cold. These colds are caused by viruses, and antibiotics have no role in their treatment .The best thing that parents can do....

Movember at Swedish Thoracic Surgery

November is associated with two significant cancer awareness efforts that have meaning to all of the staff at Swedish Thoracic Surgery.

First, and most important to us, November is Lung Cancer Awareness month.  Each year for the last 6 years we have suported this important cancer with an event for the public.  Lung cancer is the most common cancer and remains the deadliest of all cancers.  Yet, is is always shrouded in secrecy because of its association with smoking.  But, many of the patients quit smoking some time ago or were never smokers and must still face this deadly disease.

This year, a public event - Shine a Light on Lung Cancer -  will be held on Tuesday, November 7, 2001 at 5:30 pm at Gilda's Club on 1400 Broadway.  Anyone who has been touched by lung cancer is encouraged to attend.

Second, November is also becoming known as Movember.  This movement has been to support men's cancer initiatives and prostate cancer with the LIVESTRONG Foundation and Prostate Cancer Foundation.  The men at Swedish Thoracic Surgery have come out in support of both of these important issues and are participating in Movember.  As of November 1, 2011 - all of us were clean shaven.

Swedish Hospice Raises Awareness During Hospice and Palliative Care Month

SEATTLE, Nov. 4, 2011 – November is National Hospice and Palliative Care Month and Swedish Hospice, a service of Swedish Visiting Nurse Services (SVNS), will be hosting informational displays at Swedish's three hospital campuses in Seattle during the month to ensure people know this valuable resource is available in King County. Both Swedish Hospice and SVNS are nonprofit services certified by Medicare and Medicaid.

 

In Real Life

This video has sparked some controversy about exposing babies and young children to technology. Some people think it’s a shame that the baby thinks the magazine is ‘broken’. It seems to me that the baby is just figuring out that the iPad works one way and the magazine works another. She’s trying out her world. She’s testing those Baby Physics again.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has stated quite clearly that “pediatricians should urge parents to avoid television viewing for children under the age of two years.”  This is to include limiting the time exposure as well as limiting the content to appropriate entertainment (no violence, drugs, alcohol, etc.).

I agree completely that screen time should be limited for our children but it would be nearly impossible to completely restrict all exposure to media.  We just need to harness the technology and use it appropriately.  

Our children are growing up in an age where we can carry the internet in our pockets. They do need to learn their way around a laptop and an iPad.   We get upset if the schools don’t have computer labs or the latest technology. Some schools even issue laptops instead of textbooks because laptops are so inexpensive but can be updated so easily. That’s wonderful. The amount of knowledge at our fingertips is incredible and increasing exponentially everyday.

However, there are serious drawbacks to too much screen time:

Swedish/Issaquah Welcomes First Baby Born at New Facility

  
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