November 2011
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November 2011 posts

Holiday Open House at The Shops at Swedish

You’ll Have a Jolly Good Time

Need an excuse to stop by the new Swedish/Issaquah hospital? More fun than you’ve ever had in a hospital is coming up on Thursday, Dec. 8. Stop by anytime between 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. for a holiday open house at The Shops at Swedish/Issaquah. It’s just one way we hope to spread some holiday cheer to the community this winter.

Bring the whole family for some fun. The event will feature:

  • A giant 7-foot gingerbread house that kids can help decorate
  • Free cookie decorating in Café 1910
  • 20%-off merchandise at The Shops at Swedish: Lily and Pearl, Comfort & Joy, Be Well and Perfect Fit boutiques – some exclusions apply
  • Free Starbucks Christmas Blend brewed coffee
  • Free apple cider and hot cocoa in Café 1910
  • Storytelling for the kids from 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. with Jen Nielsen (www.barefootenrichment.com)

  • Coloring contest for kids – the first 250 submissions will receive a free 12-inch Swedish Build-a-Bear teddy bear

Kids will have a blast decorating the giant gingerbread house with our Café chefs! Also, come find that perfect package for a family member, friend or loved one. And, browse our festive holiday decorations and home accessories.

In addition, Café 1910 will remain open for dinner until 8 p.m. 

Happy Holidays from Swedish/Issaquah! We Ho-Ho-Hope to see you on Dec. 8!

Stroke Care at Four Swedish Campuses Designated by Washington State Department of Health

SEATTLE, Nov. 29, 2011 – Swedish is proud to announce that the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) designated four of its campuses – Cherry Hill, First Hill, Ballard and Edmonds – to provide stroke care. The Washington State DOH Emergency Cardiac and Stroke system was created to provide a statewide designation program that recognizes the level of stroke care capabilities available to stroke patients in medical facilities across the state. The Swedish Stroke System of Care has been certified by The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center since 2004.

Swedish Cherry Hill is one of only four hospital campuses in King County to receive Level I designation.

Washington DOH designated Swedish Cherry Hill as a Level I facility, recognizing their leadership in providing stroke care to people throughout Seattle and the Puget Sound region. Swedish Cherry Hill provides comprehensive stroke care – including acute thrombolytic interventions to break clots down and restore circulation, advanced diagnostic imaging to identify a blocked artery, and catheter-based interventions to re-open arteries. Swedish admits about 1,000 stroke patients annually, and provides 24/7 acute stroke care. In addition, Swedish Cherry Hill is engaged in clinical research utilizing advanced diagnostic imaging and offering novel therapies for acute stroke patients.

Gala Dinner Supports Expansion of Cancer Services, Charity Care at Swedish/Edmonds

EDMONDS, WASH., Nov. 28, 2011 – More than 500 hundred people attended the Swedish Edmonds Imagine Gala, Celebrating Change – an event benefitting the hospital and the community. Held Nov. 18 at Lynnwood Convention Center, the Gala included live music, dinner, as well as silent and live auctions that raised more than $420,000 to support the funding of charity care and a major expansion of cancer services at Swedish Edmonds.

A new two-story, medical oncology facility on the hospital’s campus, as well as renovation of the adjacent existing radiation therapy center, will provide comprehensive cancer-care services close to home for residents of Edmonds and other communities in north King and south Snohomish counties. The new cancer facility is on schedule to open in 2012.

How do you know if you're having a stroke?

Hopefully, you won't have a stroke. But if you do, do you know what to do? Why is it important that you get to an emergency room quickly? Knowing the signs and symptoms of stroke could help save your life or the life of a loved one. How do you lessen your risk of having another stroke? Is your family at increased risk? Dr. William Likosky, director of Swedish Stroke and Telestroke programs, explains.

(Click here to see the entire playlist and other questions answered about stroke, including why follow up care is so important.)

Consumer's Choice

In our country, we get to choose what to purchase. It’s a wonderful thing. Ford or Chevy? Levi’s or Wranglers? Wii or XBox? Whatever the choice may be, we have to make decisions. Advertising often influences which product we choose, as well as, reviews from friends, family, magazines, and the consumer reviews online.

When I look at a review, I tend to skip past all the ‘happy, 5-star” reviews. I want to know what sorts of problems people are experiencing, not how quickly the package arrived. I want to look at what the product does and how it functions. Especially, if it’s for a child then is it safe and age-appropriate? (I don’t want to give a choking hazard to a child who likes to put things in their mouth).

The holiday season and shopping process can be difficult for parents. We have a special set of challenges put to us:

Bacon Fennel Stuffed Trout

We know you’re trying to eat more fish, so here’s a recipe that’s easy and elegant. And we’ve included a favorite comfort food: bacon! Serves 4. 

Ingredients

  • Cooking spray
  • 2 slices turkey bacon
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • ½ cup sliced onion
  • 1 cup fennel bulb, thinly sliced
  • 2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, chopped fine
  • 2 tablespoons low-sodium chicken stock
  • 2 small trout, whole, deboned and butterflied (1½ pounds total)
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Heat large skillet over medium-high heat, lightly spray with cooking spray. Add bacon and cook until well done. Remove from heat and cut into strips.
  3. In the same pan, heat olive oil; add onion and fennel. Sauté until both have softened, 3 minutes. Add rosemary and chicken stock. Simmer until liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat, stir in bacon.
  4. To stuff fish, lay open fish on cutting board; sprinkle with pepper and drizzle with lemon juice. Spread ½ of the cooked filling on the bottom side and close. Repeat with the second fish.
  5. Place fish on an oil-sprayed baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes or until fish flakes. To serve, cut fish in half across the body and plate each half.

Per serving: 294 calories, 37g protein, 4g carbohydrate, 13g fat, 3g sat fat, 5g mono fat, 106mg cholesterol,1g fiber, 200mg sodium

The Seasoned Cook We love trout for its great taste, as well as for its economical source of high quality protein. We also appreciate how it pairs well with mild vegetables, such as leeks and zucchini. If you’re not an expert with a knife, ask your butcher to fillet and butterfly the fish. They will happily exhibit their skill.

Thanksgiving Table Talk

During this time of year the talk at the dinner table is so entertaining that we remain seated for hours, dishing up more extraordinary conversations and your third “taste” of pie as the wine evaporates. But which holiday foods have the most nutritional benefits? I’ll highlight some of your favorite holiday foods so you have something to bring to the table this Thursday.

History of Thanksgiving 1.0

The important stuff was taught in elementary school, but in case your memory needs a boost: the pilgrims had a bit of a rocky start (battling crop failure and disease) following their arrival to Plymouth in December 1620. With help from Native Americans, the crop the following year was one to be celebrated. The three day celebration featured boiled pumpkins, berries, dried fruits, seafood (fish, lobster, clam), corn and venison. Fast forward 2.5 centuries. Today, you can thank the gentleman on the US penny for proclaiming Thanksgiving as a national holiday in 1863 (for those of you only familiar with plastic, that would be Abraham Lincoln).

Enough with the history lesson, let’s get to the next course on tastier stuff!

Traditional Foods Today

Sweet Potato (with marshmallows) Casserole

Did the Pilgrims have a successful crop of jet-puffed marshmallows in 1621? Nice try. How did these little sugar clouds end up dancing with our sweet potatoes today? I have no idea. Hate to break the news, but the marshmallow package lies - these little bullets contain no derivative of the marshmallow plant. Plant? Yes – it does exist, and was first used in confections in France in the early 19th century by sweetening and then whipping the sap of the root. It was labor intensive, so manufactures figured out a way to make it easy – adding gelatin and corn starch (solution to everyone’s problem – right?). Nutritional value? Zero.

Let’s instead focus on the antioxidant packed potatoes tucked beneath this sugary fluff. But did you know: sweet potatoes aren’t actually potatoes! They are members of the morning glory family. There are over 400 varieties of sweet potatoes – big picture is that they contain carotenes (vitamin A), vitamin C, manganese, copper, fiber, vitamin B6, potassium and iron. Vitamin A is fat soluble, so eating it with a little healthy fat (as in organic olive oil) helps absorption. So go ahead and enjoy this dish that has snuck into the traditional lineup, just dig deep for the nutrient rich stuff on the bottom!

Turkey

Post-turkey naptime! Pardon the honesty, but it might be all the wine, plummeting blood sugar levels, fatty foods, and the 3rd serving you knew you shouldn’t go for, but yes, there is a little (as in close-to-no) chip of chemistry behind this claim. Turkey contains the amino acid tryptophan – the precursor for serotonin. Serotonin induces sleep. Being the foodie detective that I am, using a reputable software program I found the following:

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