May 2014
Blog

May 2014 posts

Dr. Elizabeth Meade discusses marijuana use and kids on New Day Northwest

Assistant Chief of Pediatrics at Swedish Medical Center, Elizabeth Meade, M.D., joined New Day Northwest host Margaret Larson on a special episode dedicated to marijuana in Washington State.

Dr. Meade discussed the impacts marijuana use can have on children and adolescents, as well as things parents should be aware of thinking about marijuana use and their children.

Watch the segment featuring Dr. Meade here: http://www.king5.com/new-day-northwest/Marijuana--kids-258133961.html.


Stay connected with the latest information on improving your child's health at www.swedish.org/parentelligence.

Richard Sherman’s cancer ‘rant’ goes viral, tops 100,000 views

One week ago today, we posted a YouTube video of Seattle Seahawks star Richard Sherman sounding off on cancer as part of the Swedish Cancer institute’s campaign o spread the word about the launch of its new Personalized Medicine Program.


We had no idea the video would quickly go viral. This morning, the video topped 100,000 views on YouTube.
Not only has the video struck a chord with so many viewers who can relate to the need for a better approach to fighting cancer, it has also grabbed the attention of the media. Here is just a sampling of all the news outlets that have posted, covered or shared it on social media:
 
Thanks to Richard Sherman and everyone for helping to spread the word about extraordinary care and extraordinary caring at Swedish Cancer Institute.

Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when a weak area in the aorta (the major blood vessel that sends blood through the body) dilates and quietly expands. The dilated area can rupture or leak. Often AAA is only discovered when it appears on an X-ray taken for some other reason – or when it ruptures.
 
AAA is the third leading cause of death in men ages 60 and older. Nearly 90 percent of the time, a ruptured AAA causes death, so it is important to discover and treat it early.
 
Risk factors include:

Facts and myths about antioxidants and cancer

Some of the most popular misconceptions surrounding cancer, cancer prevention and cancer treatment are about the role of antioxidants. Like many of the popular myths about cancer, there are facts, half-facts and outright falsehoods.
 
Fact: Damage to genes, particularly those involved in the regulation of cell division and cell death, is the key event in the development of cancer. 
Fact: Oxidants are substances, most often generated by our own body, that cause damage to chemicals, including the DNA that makes up our genes, by oxidizing them. The oxidation reaction most familiar to us is when metal rusts. 
Fact: Our bodies’ oxidants can contribute to cancer.
 
Half-fact: Antioxidants are chemicals we ingest that then run around neutralizing oxidants, rendering them powerless to promote cancer. The so-called antioxidant vitamins, of which vitamin C, E, and beta-carotene are the most well known are more properly called redox agents. In a particular environment, they prevent or reverse oxidation, called reduction. But they may change the acidity or even just the concentrations of the components of the reaction, and they may facilitate just the opposite. For example ....
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