May 2013
Blog

May 2013 posts

Seattle Channel highlights Swedish MS Center research

Thousands of people are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) each year. The Pacific Northwest is home to more than 12,000 people living with the disease. Our area is also making great strides in research to find the cause and new treatments for MS.

The Seattle Channel featured a health special Thursday documenting the lives people affected by the disease and the progress area doctors and scientists are making. In the health special, the Seattle Channel highlights research at the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center that is advancing what we know and how docs treat the disease.

Watch the video for the full story, including an interview with Dr. James Bowen, a neurologist specializing in multiple sclerosis at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute, and a look inside the MS Center at Swedish:

 

What To Expect When You Are Going To Have Surgery

If you are reading this, and the thought of having an operation is a little daunting, it may be helpful to arm yourself with some useful information. For most folks, the mere idea of undergoing a surgery can be a stressful and confusing time. Many people are still recovering from the surprise that their condition requires an operation, and are unprepared and overwhelmed with the amount of information they are given in anticipation of the procedure. Below is a brief and simplified summary of some of the things you may be told and are expected to understand. Because every surgery is a little different in regard to indications, expectations, risks, and recovery, the guide below should serve as a road map to help you navigate the process.

Most surgeons use the terms preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative to describe the various stages involved, and we will break these down to make understanding them a little easier.

Preoperative

Everything involved in the preparation for a surgical procedure falls under this category. In some instances, this stage is ...

iPad Loan Program at the Swedish Cancer Institute

Going through cancer treatment as a patient, family member or caregiver can take a lot of personal time. And we know that being in a hospital environment on a day-to-day basis can be exhausting. Here at the Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI), we aim to provide resources and access to services to help your mind, body and spirit heal.

One way we do this is through using innovative programs that help connect patients and family members to resources within the community. Recently, SCI has launched a new iPad Loan Program that puts interactive and educational resources right at your fingertips.

You can use the iPads while waiting in the lobby or even during treatment to:

Control your blood pressure to prevent stroke

High blood pressure, also called hypertension, is a leading risk factor for stroke. Yet, more than 1 in every 3 adults in the Northwest has been diagnosed with high blood pressure.

Here are some things you can do:
  • Visit your healthcare provider:  Have your blood pressure checked at least once a year – more often if you have a history of high blood pressure, have heart disease, have diabetes, or are overweight. 
  • Get involved:  If you have high blood pressure it's important to work with your provider to improve your health.  This may include changes in diet, exercise, and medications.  Implement changes incrementally for success!
  • Know your family medical history:  If high blood pressure runs in your family, it’s important to ...

Swedish Response to Release of CMS Pricing Data

SEATTLE, May 8, 2013  – We fully support the government for taking action toward making our health care system more affordable and accountable. Today’s release of data showing significant variation across the country and within our communities in what hospitals charge for common inpatient Medicare services is a good initial step in reforming the healthcare system.

Restoring cognition in multiple sclerosis

Cognitive dysfunction is common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and can be present from initial diagnosis through late stages of the disease.  The most common issues are problems with:

  • Attention

  • Information processing (thinking)

  • Learning and memory

Recent papers have looked into which rehabilitative strategies would most help these issues.  A new study published in the journal Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair shows how one specific intervention could improve or restore impaired attention functions in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who experienced major attention deficits....

Supporting the March for Babies

Dr. Packia Raj and I helped with the March of Dimes Walk (March for Babies) on Saturday, May 4th at the Seattle Center.



The March for Babies is the longest-running and most widely recognized walking event in the nation with 2013 marking its 75th anniversary. This fundraiser incorporated thousands of volunteers participating in a fun-filled day of walking to raise money in support of lifesaving research and programs to make sure every baby gets a chance for a healthy start in life... 
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