Control your blood pressure to prevent stroke

Control your blood pressure to prevent stroke

By Annie Sanford, RN, BSN
Stroke Clinical Effectiveness Coordinator

High blood pressure, also called hypertension, is a leading risk factor for stroke. Yet, more than 1 in every 3 adults in the Northwest has been diagnosed with high blood pressure.

Here are some things you can do:

  • Visit your healthcare provider:  Have your blood pressure checked at least once a year – more often if you have a history of high blood pressure, have heart disease, have diabetes, or are overweight. 

  • Get involved:  If you have high blood pressure, it's important to work with your provider to improve your health.  This may include changes in diet, exercise, and medications.  Implement changes incrementally for success!

  • Know your family medical history:  If high blood pressure runs in your family, it’s important to alert your provider and work together to ensure optimal health.

  • Troubleshoot side effects:  Talk to your provider about any unpleasant side effects of your medications.  Other options may exist.

  • Learn your resources:  Blood pressure medications do not have to be costly.  Ask your provider about programs to help you with medication expenses.

  • Read more about high blood pressure here or here.

You can also click here to take your “My Life Check” assessment and learn about your stroke risks, click here for a quick and easy stroke risk assessment, or call the Swedish stroke program for more information at 206-320-3200.

If you've experienced a stroke, consider attending the stroke survivor support group meeting on May 28 (last Tuesday of each month) to discuss, educate, encourage and support in a relaxed environment.  This is a great opportunity to meet new friends, learn about their experiences and discover the resources they found most helpful. (Call the Swedish stroke program for more information at 206-320-3200.)

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About the Author

Annie Sanford, RN, BSN

Annie Sanford, RN, BSN
Stroke Clinical Effectiveness Coordinator

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