May 2011
Blog

May 2011 posts

What were we thinking?

When we decide to have a baby (or the idea was placed upon us by an unexpected positive pregnancy test), we start to think about the idea of what it means to have a baby. We imagine all these wonderful thoughts of a sweet baby sleeping and walks in the park with a stroller. We also start to look at our friends who have children. You know, those children who whine, complain and throw temper tantrums and the exasperated parents then just give the child what they want to quiet them down. We think to ourselves, “That won’t be us. We’ll do things differently.”

Now, we find ourselves back on our couch after the monumental event of giving birth and a way too short stay where we had room service and a nurse call button 24 hours a day.

We look at each other, then at the beautiful baby in our arms and simultaneously say, “Now what?”.

Let’s look at the changes for everyone involved to gain some perspective.

Changes Mom Partner Baby
Physical Yes, Labor Yes, Stress Everything changed
Hormonal Yes Yes
Psychological Yes (now a mom) Yes (now a dad)
Emotional Yes See above
Disturbed Sleep Yes Yes

How do we navigate the concurrently tumultuous and joyous waters that is being a new parent? How do we keep our relationship strong while enduring the impact of having a baby?

To start, we need to get back to basics:

What are some signs of hearing loss?

Hearing loss has been called an “invisible” health condition, as there are no outward physical signs associated with it. Hearing loss can occur gradually, often making it difficult to be aware of hearing loss if and when it occurs. Hearing loss negatively affects quality of life, the ability to communicate with others, and the awareness of one’s environment.

You could have hearing loss if:

Questionable Hope for CCSVI in Multiple Sclerosis

Once again, multiple sclerosis patients’ area buzz over a new theory and treatment for the disease. The theory is called chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI); and, this time, social media is driving the patient excitement.

CCSVI is based on a controversial idea that impaired venous drainage of the brain due to blockage in venous structures causes MS. Increase in venous pressure promotes leakage of blood across capillaries, with inflammation resulting from the iron deposition into the brain. In 2009 Paolo Zamboni, M.D., reported that virtually all MS patients in a study had abnormalities in the jugular or azygous veins, whereas no control patients had such findings. The Zamboni, or Liberation, procedure involves either angioplasty or stenting of the abnormal vein. Many MS patients are understandably enthusiastic about this theory and treatment.

There are, however, a number of problems with the CCSVI theory that patients and MS neurologists should consider.

 

Swedish Robotic-Assisted Surgical Program Grows, Continues to Gain Momentum

Specialty Dental Services now available for the uninsured at Swedish

What do you do if you don’t have insurance and need healthcare? The Swedish Community Specialty Clinic is here to help – and it is designed exclusively to treat low-income uninsured or underinsured patients.  We provide advanced medical care at no cost by volunteer specialists from Swedish and several other physician groups.

At Swedish Community Specialty Clinic, we:

  • Provide another resource for those who have no other options for specialized care.
  • Combine several existing and new services under one roof and improve care through innovations such as electronic health records.
  • Server as a dedicated space for volunteer physicians to meet with patients.
  • Include a support staff to help maintain physician schedules and set initial visits and follow-ups.

“The Specialty Clinic is a testament to Swedish’s commitment to serve the entire community,” says Swedish CEO  Dr. Rod Hochman. “We want to set a new standard in community health and clearly demonstrate that charity care is a core part of our non-profit mission, which continues even in a down economy.”

The clinic, which cares for patients with appointments on weekdays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., is located near advanced medical imaging facilities and other specialty-care professionals. We estimate more than 2,000 patients will be seen at the facility each year for dermatology, general surgery, hand surgery, orthopedics and podiatric surgery services.

Patients likely to use the new clinic:

Swedish Begins Patient Enrollment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Clinical Trial

Issue 3 - SEIU Presents Majority of Their Proposal

 SEIU Presents Majority of Their Proposal

Continued theme of collaboration and reinforces efficiency, quality and satisfaction

Yesterday, Swedish and SEIU 1199NW continued contract negotiations. SEIU 1199NW presented the majority of their proposal for changes to language in the contract and will present the rest of their proposal including an economic proposal on Tuesday, May 17. In addition to the economic proposal, the Union expects to make four to six additional proposals including such topics as low census fund at Issaquah, calculating hours, neutrality and other groups joining the Union.

The Union walked through their proposal and provided testimonials to address a variety of issues affecting RNs, technical staff and service workers including:

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